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  • keithmroberts

    How NOT to use blogs

    By keithmroberts

    This area is not for queries but for ongoing blogs. if you want to ask for help, please go to the appropriate sub-forum in the main part of the GWF. You have been asked to make your first post in a specified location. Once you have done that, your query can be raised in the various sections of the forum. If you previously posted a request for help or information in this area, it is likely to be deleted at some point in the next few weeks or months. So if you have a reply, please make a note of it, If not, can you re-post it in the appropriate part of the forum, which is likely to get you a quick response. Keith Roberts for the GWF team
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Our community blogs

  1. B G Hood's Blog

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    blog-0939035001362677151.jpgI am trying to find out the history of my brass WW1 Tank. The tank is subscribed B G Hood, 2nd Aug 1915 Lincoln. I have concluded that William Fosters &Co Lincoln, were the company that built the first world war one Tank dated aug-sept 1915, this date fits in with the same date inscribed on my tank, I think my brass tank is what was named the" Big Willie tank" which was built after the "little willie tank" I am also trying to establish if the name B G Hood which is also inscribedcould this possibly be a persons name or if it is linked to the Big Gun Hood battleship.
  2. peter19's Blog

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    Hello, this is my first involvement with the Forum - here goes. I know there must be many others interested with particular units etc. My interest is the Essex Regt. WW1. Could anybody advise me on how to get War diary's without having to spent too much money. ( I am a pensioner !!)

  3. Gorton19's Blog

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    Yesterday 27/2/13 I found the remains of a World War One soldier In a field in pozieres I have declared the remains to the gendarmerie and passed on the personal effect I found which incl :-

    A spoon

    A fork

    A ring

    An Australian badge

    A button

    And some little beads ??

    I believe the remains have been recovered today from the field and I await their findings , i am hoping they will find some indication as to who this soldier is

  4. driverkelly's Blog

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    driverkelly
    Latest Entry

    I have as part of my collection an Adams & co, trench periscope no,9 mk2. It is in reasonably good condition except for the label. I will attach an image to demonstrate its deterioration.

    What I am seeking is anyone who has the same item with the label intact and who would be willing to photograph the label, this would allow me to exhibit the complete label alongside the original periscope to demonstrate how it would have looked in use.

    Any assistance or infomation would be greatly appreciated.

    Regards Al Kelly.

    I apologise I could not work out how to attach the image of the periscope.

  5. hallgreens@btinternet.com's Blog

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    hallgreens@btinternet.com
    Latest Entry

    My friends & I are trying to collect any information about the Rothienorman and surrounding areas. I would be grateful for any information about Kinbroom House, Rothienorman House, Blackford House or any other stories you may have. Thanks L

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    Good morning,

    I just registered on this forum.

    I’m Italian and I’m doing a research about the British Army intervention in Italy during 1917-1918.

    I'd be interested to maps of the trenches, in particular indicating barracks and artillery positions in the area of the Asiago plateau.

    If you have any one, I would be very pleased to see it, or just have a copy of that!

    So you can go back to the places and map using GPS.

    Can anyone help me?

    Andrea

  6. mfarrell75's Blog

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    Myself and a number of my friends are travelling to visit and find some of our relatives that were killed in the great war. We have some that wants to visit places and pay our respects to all the people that died in the war. We are travelling up from Normandy and hope to spend 4 days in the area of the War graves and sites. What we are looking for is somewhere that we could stay for the 4 days. We are a part of 12 and all travelling on motorcycles. We are looking for a house of some form of self catering for the 4 days that is central to all the site. We would be very grateful with any help or assistance in places to see or visit.

    Many Thanks

    Michael Farrell, Ireland

  7. lynner's Blog

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    lynner
    Latest Entry

    I am looking for records of my grandfather Frank Milsom, WW1, Duke of Cornwall Regiment, no. 35657, then the Wiltshire Regiment, 0682. I have found these records on Ancrestry but believe other records to have been burnt in the fire of WW2.

    He was on the Transylvania when it went down in May 1917 but survived and was in Savona until May 10 1917 then returned to Mareseille. Does anyone know the ship from Savona to Marseille? Where did he go from here, possibly Alexandria or elsewhere in Egypt. What happened on the battlefield for the DDLI in Africa after May 1917, why would he have been tranferred to the Wiltshire Regiment.

    Any information would be gratefully received.

  8. Ian Whitehouse's Blog

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    Ian Whitehouse
    Latest Entry

    Hello

    I am researching my Wifes Uncle George W Finney who enlisted at the beginning of the war 6th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment , killed in action on the 16th April 1916 in France Area not known, Military Cemetery also not known

    can anyone help

    Thanks Ian

  9. wardentony's Blog

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    I have two medals that i'm having dificulty confirming the regiments on, both Victory Medals.N0 1 is C of HRS; No 2 is 5 CMR;

    I'm new to medal colecting and require help

    Tony

  10. Theevangelist21's Blog

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    First off - I hope I am not offending Mr Robert's rules, I just don't have enough savvy to know where to put this because I can't start a new thread in the Forums section.

    My True or False Query is with regard to a book I am currently reading by Jeffrey Archer titled As The Crow Flies. The book appears to be biographical in nature although I have only read the first chapter. The chapter centres upon Charlie Trumper, a barrow boy or costermonger in Whitechapel. Following the death of his father George Trumper who, according to the author, served in the Royal Fusiliers during WWI, Charlie himself signs up, does his training in Edinburgh and then is sent to the front line.

    The author (Archer) givesthe following as Charlie Trumper's service number - 7312087

    Charlie Trumper fought in the Battle of the Lys. He was promoted to Corporal and then Lance-Corporal under Colonel Hamilton. Was part of the counter-attack against General von Ludendorff at Marne, 18 July 1918.

    One of the chapter's other characters was a Private Tommy Prescott, posthumously awarded the Military Medal following this action.

    Apparently the Regiment won a VC, six MCs and eight other MMs for that action.

    Charlie Trumper was discharged from active service on 20 February 1919 with the rank of Sargeant.

    So, my Query is, has Mr Jeffrey Archer given me a True and accurate picture or is the entire thing False?

    Afterthought - not since reading Sunbird by Wilbur Smith in 1975 have I been compelled to do this type or amount of research on a book character.

    All information given to me will become part of this Blog, so I thank all corespondents in advance.

    My email address is Theevangelist21@hotmail.com my name is Mike Wright and I reside in Dawesville Western Australia, if this is any help.

  11. BARTONBEACH's Blog

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    Hello I am researching my grandfather Frederick George Wheeler no. 189477 and 202957 who joined the Reserve at Brockenhurst on 8/12/1915 aged 31. From his medical record he then seems to have enlisted 5/9/1916 at Winchester, joined 14th Bat Hampshires and posted to France in Dec 1917. Can anyone tell me where he would have been in France with the Battalion between his landing and his wounding while part of the 17th Entrenching Service on 4 April 1918. I understand he joined this Service on the disbanding of the 14th. Can someone explain what the Entrenching Service was ... digging trenches? He was a Post Master at Fawley and I am fascinated to know what duties he would have had. His injuries must have been severe as he spent over 200 days in intensive care once back in the UK. Thank you for any help.

  12. bril6's Blog

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    bril6
    Latest Entry

    In Topic: Tom Rutherford RIP

    Today, 12:19 PM

    hi tom was my uncle although i did not know him very well because my mum his brother left her native Dundee in 1966 and settled in Darwen lancashire .but i too am coincidently intrested in military history until a couple of years ago more ww2 than ww1 but i have adopted a ww1 grave in my home town that was untended .so ww1 is more ofg an intrest to me and hope to enjoy and learn for the items within this site best wishes from Darwen lancashire

  13. Henk H.M.'s Blog

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    Dear all,

    I am the author of the book The Live Bait Squadron, Three Mass Graves off the Dutch coast, 22 September 1914. I presented my book about Aboukir, Cressy and Hogue in an audience of some 100 descendants 22 September last in Chatham/Rochester. But as 2,200 men were in these ships I would be very happy if I could have contact with a lot more. For this reason I established The Live Bait Squadron Society, with a website under construction and a quarterly Bulletin, all for free. My aim is to have an appropriate 100 year's Commemoration in September 2014 as well in UK as in Holland.

    If you want to join The Society, please let me know: your name, where to reach you, the name of your ancestor, and what ship he was in. If you are just interested: you can be Member of the Non-Related Group.

    Yours,

    Henk H.M.

  14. ALCTAy's Blog

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    Today I posted this MIC for Thomas Stanley REAY and the information that I had gathered from it. Straight away someone pointed out that it also contained the date of REAY's commission as Lieutenant, something that I hadn't noticed.

    I was also pointed in the direction of a resource I'd never heard about - The Liverpool Scroll of Honour, and then received an offer of a scan of the relevant entry. The people on this forum are amazing, not just that they know so much, but they are (for the most part!) so willing to share what they know. Brilliant.

    REAY's entry on my blog is at http://thewarmemorial.blogspot.co.uk/2012/08/lieutenant-thomas-stanley-reay-ps3182.html

    I'm always happy to receive comments on the blog (usually pointing out my errors!) and suggestions for improvements or new information to be added.

  15. Well dear reader,

    As you can tell from the entry dates of this blog i have not been very good at keeping things up to date.

    Anyroadup........Just returned from a four day stay at Chavasse House with six other like minded chaps. Left home at around midnight on Monday 17th and had a nice quiet mini bus (Ford Toureno) ride down to the Chunnel.

    As you can imagine we arrived nice and early so instead of the 08:20 crossing we got onto a much earlier departure, thus giving us even more time in France.

    Once across (under) the channel it was full steam ahead to Vimy Ridge, a place I had not been to before. Impressive monument and with one of our party having a relative named on the walls we spent a fair amount of time there. We also took the underground tunnel tour which was most informative and gave us all an insight into the underground conflict.

    As we had to wait until about 1500 hrs to get into Chavasse we indulged in our first taste of French food......Yes it was into Alberts Maccy D's for a Grande Mac and Frites, then a wizz down the road to the Super U supermache for supplies (read beer & BBQ meats)

    Up to Chavasse and bag a bedroom........Now, knowing what a bunch of snorers we had I managed to sort the larger of the ground floor double bedrooms to myself. Made up the bed, put on the kettle and made a brew. It was then time for the BBQ to get fired up and a few bottles of beer to get quaffed. Off to bed at about midnight. Day one over.

    Day two..........Up at about at just after 07:30, breakfast of bacon, eggs, sausage and baguette...(The bread van arrives at Chavasse at about 0800) Out and about by 10:00 and off to Thiepval and Ulster Tower......Did a quick look at the cemeteries ext to Ulster Tower and booked a tour of the woods with the new 'tenants' Don & Maureen (who we named Rapunzel, cos she loved living in the tower)

    We met Don for the walk and were joined by a coupe of other guys, one wearing sunnies and a baseball cap and the other a quite tall guy, they were clearly together but I took no particular notice of either.

    Anyway after a fantastic tour by Don (I have done similar with Teddy, but this was even better) one of our group said "That's Alexi Sayle in the baseball cap" Well courage was drawn and an approach made. Guess what Mr Sayle was very good had his picture took with our group and chewed the fat back at the Tower. Funny but 'Rapunzel' was serving behind the counter and never even knew he had been a visitor.

    A quick tramp to the Popes nose observation point, a field walk that gave up a live 303 round (left where it was) then back on the bus to travel the short distance to Pozieres and the tank memorial and the windmill site. By now we had also visited a fair few cemeteries along the way and it was almost 17:00 hrs so a blast back to Chavasse for scoff and an evening of shooting the sh*te in the Rum Ration bar. at about 00:30 it was the end of day two.....

    Day three....Up again at 0730 quick 3 S routine and breaky was a repeat of day two.....Out again by 10:00 and off to visit Sunken Lane, Hawthorn Crater and Redan Ridge number 1 cemetery where 'we' had a local boy buried. I always find sunken lane such an atmospheric place, quite spooky to be where those lads were asking "are we in the right place?" Up to Hawthorn Crater and a couple of lads go down inside to have a loser look while I did a bit of a field walk. (nowt found) We then went up to Redan Ridge and traced cemetery number 1, where a local lad (from Swindon Nr Dudley) is laid to rest. Private 689 Sidney Henry Garston was in the Royal Fusiliers and died on 14th November 1916 aged 23. He has a grave in Swindon that states he died at Beaumont Hammel.

    From there it was a trip to see the Sheffield Pals memorial and Railway cutting cemetery etc. As we were then moving back past Ulster Tower one of our party uttered the fateful words "I wonder what Iain Mchenry is doing now" The van driver then uttered the fateful phrase " Goodness me (or similar) there he is in the front of that coach" The coach came to a halt at the Tower and we were duly re-united with Iain who's services we had hired some years before when we were on the Salient. So it was time for a brew and sarny at the Tower and a rejoining with Don, Rapunzel and Iain. To close the day we drove to Peronne and visited the museum. From there we re-stocked on essentials and returned to the Rum Ration and another BBQ......We adjourned back into Chavasse House at about 23:30 and just had to drink the rest of the beer/wine as we couldn't bring it back home.. So a late night was had, got to bed at about 0100 ...End of day three.....

    Day four....Up again at 0730 (bit knackered) the 3S's and brekky, packed up and left the house at 10:00 for a quick trip to Corcelette (sp?) where the guy who had a relative remembered at Vimy also had a relly remembered here. Then we went off to Delville Wood and made a trip around the South African memorial. Fantastic place.

    Back on the minibus and off to Lochnagar crater and a drive past the site of the dig at La Boiselle then back towards the Chunnel...Got there early and again took advantage of an early crossing. Back in Blighty at 15:30 but due to crashes/roadworks or whatever the problem was we didn't get back 'home' till 2200. Grrrrrrrr....

    Well that's the trip for another year, so where next for 2013?

  16. lankey's Blog

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    al keay
    Latest Entry

    can anyone help de-cyphering the codes on a soldiers service record for battle wounds. I have 3 entries -

    C1281, C6932 and C1678. any info gratefully received - Alan Keay

  17. advanceddiver's Blog

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    I am looking for information on the said battalion, to whether there is a museum or a association linked with it. I have a relative who served with the battalion 1914-1918 as a sniper and then suffered shell shock.

  18. Magson1's Blog

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    I am keen to fine more info out on Sidney Clarence Kellaway and or his battery. Details I have so far: Est Birth Year 1895.Age at enlistment:20, Regimental Number:108715, Regiment Name: Royal Regt of Artillery, X/24 trench mortar battery, 24th divis. He won the Military Medal in 1916 and was wounded/shot in the left foot. I would dearly love to fine out more about him or his battery, being where they saw action, as his on line war records are not clear. Any more info would be great. Thank you, Brian

  19. MarkH's Blog

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    blog-0154043001346063636.jpgI live in Guernsey, Channel Islands and have been researching my family tree for some time. I have spent quite a while on two of my first cousins, one (Alphonse Dumond) killed on 13th October 1914 at Cuinchy and the other (George Dumond) lost aboard HMS Ghurka in 1917. I have been having more trouble with researching the actual service of my great-grandfather Sidney Roger West, mainly because he was a regular soldier before the Great War and his service records are not available online, presumably amongst the 60% burned. He was certainly in the 16th Lancers in 1911 because the census records show him resident at their barracks, then a lance corporal. One thing I do have though is an unusual photograph of him in 1914 with a mustered group of what must be soldiers passing out from the Royal Military College. My great grandfather was a sergeant in the 16th Lancers at this time and obviously seconded to RMC for training new officer cadets. He later went to France, his medal record shows this as being 8th December 1915. He was commissioned as a 2nd Lt in the Wiltshire Regiment but its not clear when this happened so I don't know whether he fought with the Wiltshires or the 16th Lancers.

    I have never seen the equivalent of this detailed photograph in many hours of looking at the various records available. The photograph contains the name, regiment and rank (if applicable) of all present. They include a number of notable prominent individuals, including Oswald Mosley, later to become leader of the British fascist movement. Also included are the Hon B Ogilvy, Lord Killeen and Viscount Weymouth. I am hoping that by transcribing the names and giving something to the forum I might in turn learn something more about my great grandfather's service, and those he served with. Although I never met him this photograph sat above the settee in my grandfather's lounge for at least the last 50 years so I have looked at it very regularly since I was very young and wondered at the stories of the men pictured in it. All enquiries welcome. My great grandfather is standing extreme right of the picture.

    The full list of those in this photograph is as follows:

    K Company, RMC September 1914

    Back Row – L to Right

    T.S. Dr A. Hankey

    F.J. Bridges

    J.V. Isham

    J.B.P. Fitzgerald

    W.G.N.H Dalrymple

    J.H.M White

    D.P. Cox

    W.J. Balfour

    W.H. Cubitt

    F. Egerton

    Viscount Weymouth

    R.O. Arkwright

    E.G. Pease

    P.V. Harris

    R.D Busk

    Sir A.D. Bagot, Bt

    W.D. Daly

    Second From Back Row, L to Right

    R.F. Heyworth-Savage

    Hon. J.H.P. Verner

    M.H. Birch-Reynardson

    D.H. Gough

    S.H. Le Roy Lewis

    C.N.F. Browne

    C.W. Allen

    K.F.S. West

    C.B. Scott

    W.P. Wright

    R.H.E. Abdy

    D.J.E. Norton

    F.F. Smith

    A.C. Wilson

    O.E. Mosley

    Third from Back Row L to Right

    Sergt C. Waters (18th Hussars)

    Hon. B.A.A. Ogilvy

    S.B. Horn

    B.A. Carver

    J.G.H Somervell

    H.O. Oxley

    A.B.P.L. Vincent

    J.S.M. Wardell

    W.S.C. Crawshay

    J.A.B. Lane

    G.C.P. Paul

    Hon. W.M. Stourton

    D.H. Adair

    H.C. Daniel

    L.P.G. Kelly

    R.A.W. Knight

    A.S.C. Browne

    H.F. Bowles

    R.C.M. Shelton

    J.M.Stubbs

    Sergt. C.H. Ullathorne (19th Hussars)

    Fourth From back Row L to Right

    Sergt. D.B. Higgins (21st Lancers)

    P.F.J. Kent

    J.E. Bovill

    J.E.M. Bradish-Ellames

    J.H. Sykes

    L.J.G. Souchon

    M.S. Osborne

    A.C.B Freeman

    Hon. C.J.F. Winn

    Hon. W.W. Montagu-Douglas-Scott

    Lord Killeen

    S.I. Fairbairn

    A.R. Cooper

    K.V. Edwards

    A.B. Smith

    R.A. Scott

    D.M. Stanley

    Sergt. E.H. Biddle (Scots Gds.)

    Sergt. R.J.B. Richards (16th Lancers)

    Sergt. S.R. West (16th Lancers)

    Fifth Row From Back L to Right

    Staff Sergt. J. Smith (Scots Guards)

    W.W. Hayes

    A.C. Mackintyre

    P.R.Astley

    Capt. W.P.H. Hill (Royal Fusilliers)

    Hon. H.H. Douglas-Pennant

    (Fifth Row from back, continued)

    Capt. J.T.T.W. Feinnes (R.W. Kent Regt.)

    Under Officer L.F. Marson

    Major C.N. French (Hampshire Regt.)

    D.F.G. Duff

    Major W.S. Sykes (3rd Dragoon Gds.)

    W.G. Gisborne

    Capt. E.L. Lyon (18th Hussars)

    R.B. Helme

    Capt. R.R. de C. Grubb (3rd Hussars)

    R.G. Morrison

    G.E. Younghusband

    F.W. Pink

    S.S. Major R.R.H.W.L. Carter (2nd Dragoon Guards)

    Front Row, L to Right

    J.S. Fernie

    J.H. Hirsch

    A.B. Johns

    P.G. Carr

    G. Crerar-Gilbert

    C.D.S. Mackirdy

    L.F.C. St. Clair

    T.G. Watson

    M.J. Clery

    J.O.P. Clarkson

    Photograph by Clarke & Co, Camberley

  20. blog-0419623001345305316.jpgSo many have read my grandfather's journal entries and have enjoyed them greatly and that I'm pleased. As many already know, they are a part of a larger story about three of his chums. My book The Great Promise contains the entire contents of the journal as well as the story of the promise that it supports. I've posted the book information under the proper section of the Great Forum. The book is available on Amazon so a portion of its sales will help our forum.

    Another bit of information is in regards to the future of my grandfather's military papers and journal. My brother and sister agree that we should donate them to the Imperial War Museum. We want to hand them over in person so we have been in contact with the Document and Sound department of the museum and they're pleased by our decision and accept them in my grandfather's name. We thought it was fitting to do so because he was a British soldier and his history is intertwined with his native country. It will be hard to part with such a large portion of my grandfather's life but my book forever will be connected to him. It will tell his story for generations to come and inform them what it was like to live through The Great War.

    I know from many of you that his memoirs describing his war experiences is in greater depth than many World War One history novels are able to obtain, and that is why I wanted to tell his story. Cheers to all

  21. MaureenT's Blog

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    MaureenT
    Latest Entry

    Hi I am hoping someone can help me i am looking for info on my grandfather from WW1 His name was George patchett York R no 12385 I have medals from 1914-1915 (private) 1914-1918 and 1914-1918. He won the GeorgIvs V Britt Omn medal for bravery in the field which was posted in the London gazette 22nd august 1916.on his 1914-1918 medal he is shown as a corporal. There my research has stopped I would love to now for what he won the medal. I seem to remember being told it was something to do with rescuing someone from the Cadburys family but i could be mistake. n Any help would be appreciated

  22. sunderland's Blog

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    I have been researching what people were wearing during the Great War. Did the French have a different attitude to women in quasi uniform than the British? Resistance to the idea of women in uniform existed of course in Britain - but the gradual development of nurses' and drivers' uniforms, and the civil uniforms for jobs like bus conducting, has been well documented.

    I came across a reference to French theatre being less open to actors/performers wearing uniform on stage, unlike in say London and Berlin - and there possibly being rules against? This got me wondering whether the French had a significantly different attitude to uniform. And perhaps therefore to women in uniform in particular?

    I would be very grateful for any thoughts on the subject - and any references. Thank you.

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    simonpark
    Latest Entry

    I am currently transcribing the hand-written diary of my grandfather, Major Oscar Briggs, who served with the NMMB in Egypt between 1915 and 1919. There are a great many references to people, ranks, regiments, places, etc in abbreviated, initials-only form. Some I can guess at, but others are a mystery to me. Any help -- even intelligent guesses -- would be much appreciated! A list follows, quoted direct from the diary. Thank you. Simon Park.

    Capt. Franklin, E.A. Div’l train

    Opened a/c with Base Paymaster MEF.

    Instructed to arrange exchange of rifles of ASC drivers of the Brigade for new ones

    Prosecutor at F.G.C.M. on Dr. Lacey

    Rode up to Deir el Azzab camp to see the C.T.C.

    sent by F.L.R. to Tobhar, 12 miles: Belgian loco.

    handed over to SQMS at Qasr Gebali Station

    Saw C.O. of Berks R.H.A. re alleged shortage of rations

    Major Blount D.A.Q.M.G., Capt Caldwell B.S.D.

    Made the first bulk issue to S.O.160 Inf Bde.

    Appointed S.S.O. Fayoum Section Force

    ...took over cotton platform at E.S.R. Station

    56th D.V.S. with Capt Kerridge arrived.

    Sheikhs came from Ashment to sell green dura (a foodstuff?)

    Went to M.S.D Dined with Capt Johns

    Saw the Mudir to ask him to take steps to ensure that no forage

    for the troops is handled by donkeys or

    mules at any stage. (Donkey disease)

    Brigade moves to Romani except E.R.Y

    Major Caddick, SSO 53rd Division

    Staffords to ABD.

    Stayed at A.H.T.D (Major Viney)

  23. SANDRA COLES' Blog

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    MY GRANDFATHER WAS IN THE ROYAL ENGINEERS, WE UNDERSTAND THAT HE WAS PART OF AN ARTILLERY UNIT, HE GOT INJURED QUITE SEVERELY ,AND HAD TO HAVE A METAL PLATE FITTED IN HIS SKULL AFTER SHRAPNEL ENTERED HIS SKULL, HE WAS BORN 1883 AND DIED IN 1983 LEADING A VERY LONG LIFE AFTER SUCH A SERIOUS INJURY ,WE KNOW HE WAS PART OF THE GREAT WAR FOR CIVILISATION AS WE HAVE HIS MEDAL WITH HIS NAME AND SERVICE NO AROUND THE EDGE ,WHICH IS 510020 SPR H.H.COLES.R.E.CAN ANYONE HELP OR GIVE ME SOME ANSWERS ,THANKING YOU SO MUCH

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