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towisuk

Mouquet farm

33 posts in this topic

For our Australian members......

regards

Tom

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I'm not Australian although various generations of my family have had members emigrate there (the first entirely at the government's expense!). However in September this year I stood by the memorial and stared towards where Moo Cow farm used to be. Such a short distance and so long and so many lives to get there. A much more poignant and telling story of Australian endeavour and fortitude than anything in Gallipoli or Palestine (valiant though these may have been).. So thanks for this.

Won't stop me being rude about modern Aussies though l :devilgrin:

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Yes. One of many horrific but fascinating sets of photos from the war. My grandpa was wounded there.

Jonathan

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Tom

Thanks for that post.

My great-uncle, Pte CG Larsen (16th Battalion, AIF) was killed in action on 12 August 1916. His body was not discovered until 20 years later - he fell in K trench, close to its intersection with Ration Trench and Park Lane, just south of the Farm.

These photographs, and this one of Pozieres ( http://cas.awm.gov.au/item/E00532 ) are poignant reminders of the horrors that so many men went through.

Cheers

Paul

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Hello all.

Hope this picture can give some idea of distance.

I believe the original farm was to the left of the track.

Cheers

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Great pictures I was there in 2010 hard to beleieve the damage that was done and how it looks now.

Thanks for sharing

Cheers

Rick

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Hello all.

Hope this picture can give some idea of distance.

I believe the original farm was to the left of the track.

Cheers

Where the trees are I believe. There was a tractor working the field on the left when I was there which gave some perspective. Even I with my stick could have walked it in minutes today.

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Tom. Thanks for posting. The distance between the Windmill then to the farm is so ridiculously short.

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The Australian attacks were primarily from right to left in the photo in post # 5. The old farm was in the trees to the left of the road and the modern structure. The distance from the Pozieres communal cemetery at the NE of the village to the new farm house is about 1000 metres.

Cheers

Chris

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Tom. Thanks for posting. The distance between the Windmill then to the farm is so ridiculously short.

Actually, relatively, a fair distance from the windmill.

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Yes correct, original farm to the left where trees are. There is still evidence of the re inforced concrete cellar roofs / strong points. Today usually under attack only by woolly land maggots aka sheep! As you look to the right of 17107BMs immage in the field to the fore about five / seven years ago I saw men digging the field. A polite enquiry (sticking my nose in) revealed they were from the CWGC and were exhuming a British soldier...complete skeleton, equipment and rifle etc. As they were about to go and as I was also the next spade strike led to another skull tumblibg out and clear evisence of a shrapnel strike. Very moving and poignant. Could not say if Austrailian or British though.

Regards

TT

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What is incredible about Mouquet Farm was the tenacity of the German defenders to hold it at all costs. Am I correct that there was extensive tunneling under this part of the German second line, linking with Thiepval?

Steve

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What is incredible about Mouquet Farm was the tenacity of the German defenders to hold it at all costs. Am I correct that there was extensive tunneling under this part of the German second line, linking with Thiepval?

Steve

Yes, the Germans did have a tunnelling network stretching out from the very strong cellars. These led to concealed outposts and gun nests. I haven't heard whether they went all the way to Thiepval before.

Jonathan

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would you happen to know the dates of the photo's??

Thanks

Bob R.

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The before and after photos in post 1 are on display at the Thiepval visitor centre. I do not know the exact dates but assumed (often dangerous) that they were between July/Sept 16. One thing I think is frightening is that there are likely be people in those landscapes.

Regards

John

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Hi John....hello Bob, as far as I am aware .....the upper photo was taken in June 1916, and the bottom image in Sept 1916 as John indicated above...

regards

Tom

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Standing at the top of the footpath from the Thiepval Visitor Centre towards the Memorial you get a first class view of the ground they had to cover as they attacked Mouquet Farm. As soon as they crested the ridge they would have taken fire from Thiepval. Murderous.

Regards

John

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Tom. Thanks for posting. The distance between the Windmill then to the farm is so ridiculously short.

To help you get your bearings menright, the photograph in post #5 was taken about halfway along the road from Pozieres to Thiepval. The Windmill is much further away, 2 kilometers to the right of the photographer.

Keith

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There are very similar 4 photos in Brian Gardner's "The Big Push"- I guess there are a large number of available shots.

Before the war in post # 1. - appears exactly the same as Gardners.

Top photo in #1 very similar to Gardners dated 7th June 1916

Gardners 3rd photo not as damaged as in post #1 he dates 30th June 1916

Gardners 4th Photo - more damaged than the third photo in post #1 dated 16th September1916

James

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the reason asking for date was that I did some research for a friend whose relative (Lt. Hart LEECH, 1st Canadian Mounted Rifles) was killed at Mouquet farm 15 Sept. 1916, he has no known grave. I understand the CMR's lost a large number of men during the battle. . a very interesting set of letters can be found at below site or by google : Canadian Letters & Images Project

http://www.canadianletters.ca/collections.php?BRSR=120&warid=3

regards

Bob R.

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Hi Nigel, Keith, Just noticed your postings. Thankyou for your helpful comments. I am aware of the position of The Windmill relative to Mouquet Farm. Regards,Michael

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In July I was privileged to be invited to spend a couple of days with The Families and Friends of the First AIF Inc (FFFAIF Inc) tour.

Our guide had special permission for us to walk right up to Mouquet Farm and take photos of the hallowed ground.

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Very interesting photos and thank you for posting.

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In July I was privileged to be invited to spend a couple of days with The Families and Friends of the First AIF Inc (FFFAIF Inc) tour.

Our guide had special permission for us to walk right up to Mouquet Farm and take photos of the hallowed ground.

Peter.

I wish i could have been there!

You lucky man.

Cheers.

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Thanks for posting all the photos and information.

My grandmothers cousin survived Mouquet Farm, this was his first battle.

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