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Pavster1980

Mk1 'Male' Tank Colour

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Hello all, I was recently bought an Airfix of a Mk1 'Male' Tank and would like some advice on the colour scheme to paint it in. the illustration in the "distructions" is, in my opinion, a little to bright, but knowing as much about first world war landships as I do about time travel I could do with some help. Many thanks in advance Rich

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The Airfix color sceme is accurate, but the problem is color saturation. The saturation is what makes the colors look too bright and a model toylike.

When we look at full-sized objects, water vapor in the air "fades" the color the further the object gets. The smaller the scale, the further the real object would be from your eye. So, the best thing for you to do is mix a very light gray into each color. For 1/72 scale, it could be as much as 25 percent light gray.

Another method is to overspray the finished model with a very thin light gray or light tan. Also, weather it heavily with a very dark brown wash (I used oil paint thinned with mineral spirits) and drybrush it with tan.

Compare this: http://home.comcast....ark1_male_2.jpg

to this: http://i363.photobuc...nk/WWITank5.jpg

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Problem with the Airfix kit is that it more closely portrays the Mk II, and needs a LOT of work to make a Mk I. For a Mk Ii, ditch the wheels, cab silencer and convert a few other bits, paint it Humbrol 26 or 29

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There is very little documentation about the colour scheme of the MkI tanks. They were supplied from the factories in overall light grey with the Cyrillic inscription "With Care To Petrograd", probably in white (forward of the sponsons on the vehicles from Fosters and to the rear of the sponsons in the Metropolitan machines). At least a few tanks were sent to France in this state. While "C" and "D" Co. were training at Elveden, their tanks received a camouflage paint scheme under the direction of Solomon J. Solomon. One of the tank officers described the colours as "a jolly landscape in green against a pink sunset sky". A painting produced for Fosters gives some indirect evidence that the colours may have been a variety of green splotches interspersed with red and yellow ochre. When these tanks were shipped to France, this scheme was judged to be too vivid, and the tanks were repainted in more drab tones described by a journalist as "blotched reptilian colours, hues of rattlesnake and iguana, yellow and dull grey and black and mottled brown". By the time of the Arras battles in 1917, some of the surviving MkI tanks appear to have been repainted overall medium brown. However, photos of a few of the wrecked MkI's at Arras still show the blotched camouflage scheme.

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One fun idea which I'm doing with the Airfix Female is building it as a Mk II at Arras with Mk I Female sponsons, in camouflage, whilst the rest of the tank is brown, and with the Vickers guns replaced with Lewis

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There is very little documentation about the colour scheme of the MkI tanks. They were supplied from the factories in overall light grey with the Cyrillic inscription "With Care To Petrograd", probably in white (forward of the sponsons on the vehicles from Fosters and to the rear of the sponsons in the Metropolitan machines). At least a few tanks were sent to France in this state. While "C" and "D" Co. were training at Elveden, their tanks received a camouflage paint scheme under the direction of Solomon J. Solomon. One of the tank officers described the colours as "a jolly landscape in green against a pink sunset sky". A painting produced for Fosters gives some indirect evidence that the colours may have been a variety of green splotches interspersed with red and yellow ochre. When these tanks were shipped to France, this scheme was judged to be too vivid, and the tanks were repainted in more drab tones described by a journalist as "blotched reptilian colours, hues of rattlesnake and iguana, yellow and dull grey and black and mottled brown". By the time of the Arras battles in 1917, some of the surviving MkI tanks appear to have been repainted overall medium brown. However, photos of a few of the wrecked MkI's at Arras still show the blotched camouflage scheme.

The grey is better characterised as Battleship Grey and was about the same as the grey painted on non fabric parts of aircraft fuselages. I've seen it suggested that some of the Mk IIs that went to fight at Arras were also left in grey

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There is very little documentation about the colour scheme of the MkI tanks. They were supplied from the factories in overall light grey with the Cyrillic inscription "With Care To Petrograd", probably in white (forward of the sponsons on the vehicles from Fosters and to the rear of the sponsons in the Metropolitan machines).

Small point: was the name Petrograd already in use in 1916 when the Mk Is would have gone out?

Ron

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Small point: was the name Petrograd already in use in 1916 when the Mk Is would have gone out?

Ron

Yes - Petrograd was seen as less Germanic than Petersburg (same sort of difference as Mountbatten and Battenberg)

However as the tanks left the factories covered in tarpaulins any lettering must have been intended as a deception exercise for when they were being built than when delivered.

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Thanks for input every one. Think I am just going to build it "as is" with no modification for now. Then when it is finished get a few more and modify them. Rich

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Shortly after WW I broke out St Petersburg was renamed Petrograd. In the 1920s the city was renamed Leningrad. After the fall of communism it was back to St Petersburg.

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