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markinbelfast

Isle of Man POW camp ww1?

6 posts in this topic

trench art

Were WW1 prisoners kept on the isle of man?
Boer war bit a bit confusing?
Any why would the Germans carve in English...to sell to locals?

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Mark

Type Isle of Man Prisoner of War Camps into your search engine , and you will find the information you require.

Terry Reeves

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Mark

Type Isle of Man Prisoner of War Camps into your search engine , and you will find the information you require.

Terry Reeves

world war 2 wasn't it?

http://www.online-archaeology.co.uk/Deskto...ex=102&tabid=67

Robbie

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Mark,

Knockaloe camp on the Isle of Man was used to house POWs and internees in WW1 and WW2, and these bone carvings are typical of the stuff produced. The fact the writing is in English suggests one of two things, either they were made specifically to trade with guards, or sell to locals (they did have markets for POW-made articles), or they were made by internees, who may well have been English speaking.

As you rightly point out, these are NOT Boer War - POWs from this war were shipped to St Helena or Ceylon, not the Isle of Man !!

£100 is probably not that bad a price either - pity they don't mention the camp or dates, but guess you can't have everything !!

Jim

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A Sgt Garrett{A Former Policeman on the Island} of the IoM Volunteers was a Camp Guard @ Douglas,His Son G/5444; Robert Chamber Garrett RFA Was Killed in an accident in 1916 In France.

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POWs weren't kept on IOM during ww1. They were all internees. Knockaloe held 23,000 at it's peak. It was purpose built on farmland that had been used for prewar territorial camps. It was cleared after the war.

WWII, again no POWs, they were all internees, held in a number of "camps" around the Island. The camps were, in the main, groups of boarding houses with barbed wire fences thrown around them

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