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WelshVoices

HM Trawler Saxon during WW1

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Hi all -

I am working on a book, to be published Sept. 2018, on the letters of three brothers from Swansea who served in WW1.

One of the brothers, Gabriel Eustis, served as a telegraphist on HM Trawler Saxon - a ship which was requisitioned by the navy in Sept. 1914 and converted to a minesweeper.

Searching for information about this ship's activities on the web, I haven't found much except for reports of its rescue of the crew of HMS India off Narvik in 1915 (about which there is some information on this forum). Unfortunately, the run of Gabriel's letters that has survived does not cover this event.

Also I have found some information regarding the ship's movements in Sept 1917 - Jan 1918 via naval-history.net

 

Can anyone point me towards any other useful resources regarding the activities of this ship during the war?

Thanks a lot,

 

Gethin Matthews

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ID: 3   Posted (edited)

The Fleet Air Arm Museum (National Museum of the Royal Navy) has a listing of the parent ships of all the Auxiliary Patrol trawlers, showing where the boats were based and when throughout the war. Day-to-day movements and activities will be recorded in the boat's deck logs.

The museum also has the RNVR enlistment papers of Leading Telegraphist Eustis.

Edited by horatio2

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Find my Past  has some of Gabriel's R N V R papers. Taking into account my poor eyesight it looks as if Gabriel didn't join H M T Saxon until January 1st 1916.

 

Bob

 

 

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I've come across that name before, she went aground in the forth in Aug 1915 as, iirc, she was doing duty to the battlecruisers based there, such as ferrying crew to shore, and other odd jobs like carrying stores.

 

I beleive she was around the forth area from early 1915 to at least Dec 1916.

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S.T. Saxon FD159

The vessel's history is on this LINK but scant info on her war service.

 

I have a couple of news clips on the sinking of the auxiliary cruiser "India" but they add little more 

than that posted before on the Forum, but will email them to you if you so desire?

 

Terry

 

 

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Thanks to all for your replies and assistance.

I do have copies of the RNVR enrolment form and the 'sea service' card.

I have been rather confused by the information on the RNVR form, listing a variety of ships, when his letters from November 1917 to October 1918 all state 'Saxon'. 

Looking at this again, I guess that the larger ships mentioned (Gibraltar / Brilliant / Ambitious) were the depot ships for Saxon (and presumably for other minesweepers).

 

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The "RNVR Enrolment Form" that you have is, presumably, his ADM 337 ledger record from Kew which is not, despite its heading, the enrolment form which he signed personally on joining.

HM Ships GIBRALTAR, BRILLIANT and AMBITIOUS were successive Auxiliary Patrol parent ships, based in the Shetlands.

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Thanks Horatio -

Yes, it is the ADM337 record that I have. Would there be any further information in the RNVR enlistment papers held at the Fleet Air Arm Museum?

Lord Lansdowne is also on the list (between Gibraltar and Brilliant). Also, there is a name on this record which looks like Azaria, but there was no ship of that name. Any ideas what it could be?

 

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His RNV-1 Enrolment papers will give no more details of his drafts/ships. The mystery ship is HMS ZARIA, parent ship at Scapa Flow (and later Norway). LORD LANSDOWNE was a parent ship at Oban but was probably also active at Shetland.

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Thanks for your assistance.

I have just found a 'new' photo of him - he has a design on his sleeve which I guess is to do with his rank as a Leading Telegraphist - can anyone confirm this?

 

Gabriel Eustis showing sleeve.JPG

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The badge in the photo without addition is for an ordinary telegraphist 1909-1958 or boy telegraphist 1909-1956.

Telegraphist 1909-34 has a star above.

Leading telegraphist 1909-32 has a star above & a star below.

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On 23/05/2017 at 15:44, WelshVoices said:

Thanks for your assistance.

I have just found a 'new' photo of him - he has a design on his sleeve which I guess is to do with his rank as a Leading Telegraphist - can anyone confirm this?

 

Gabriel Eustis showing sleeve.JPG

 

Gethin,

Is that a confirmed, bona-fide WW1 relic? I ask as that looks modern (post WW2) to me due to the washed hair, the hairstyle and the photographic quality of the photograph.

 

Im no social hitorian but there was reason men used brycream, etc, as shampoo wasn't invented until 1930 (and was terrible) and that lasted until the shampoo we'd recognise was introduced in the 60s which enabled the mop-haired Beatles to be clean mop-haired hearthrobs and the hippies to have long clean(ish) hair.

 

Men of my father (born early 30s) and grandfathers generations used hair-products as, unless you had indoor plumbing, bathday was of a saturday in a tin tub in front of the kitchen fire... or you went to the communal baths in the area.

 

That said, I'm always open to corrections of the better informed.

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1 hour ago, TeeCeeCee said:

 

Gethin,

Is that a confirmed, bona-fide WW1 relic? I ask as that looks modern (post WW2) to me due to the washed hair, the hairstyle and the photographic quality of the photograph.

 

Im no social hitorian but there was reason men used brycream, etc, as shampoo wasn't invented until 1930 (and was terrible) and that lasted until the shampoo we'd recognise was introduced in the 60s which enabled the mop-haired Beatles to be clean mop-haired hearthrobs and the hippies to have long clean(ish) hair.

 

Men of my father (born early 30s) and grandfathers generations used hair-products as, unless you had indoor plumbing, bathday was of a saturday in a tin tub in front of the kitchen fire... or you went to the communal baths in the area.

 

That said, I'm always open to corrections of the better informed.

 

I agree that the photo looks later than WW1 but the three white tapes on his collar are waved. These waved tapes were only worn by the RNVR and dropped out of use during WW1.

If it is Gabriel Eustis then the wings crossed by lightning flash badge without addition makes it before 30/12/15 as his service record says he qualified from ordinary telegraphist to telegraphist on that date.

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On 24/05/2017 at 22:39, ARABIS said:

 

I agree that the photo looks later than WW1 but the three white tapes on his collar are waved. These waved tapes were only worn by the RNVR and dropped out of use during WW1.

If it is Gabriel Eustis then the wings crossed by lightning flash badge without addition makes it before 30/12/15 as his service record says he qualified from ordinary telegraphist to telegraphist on that date.

 

I would think that that detail prooves it then as a period ww1 image.

 

Thanks for the correction, it's always as well to query things.

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