Remembered Today:

Chris Boonzaier

Do you know your WW1 Weapons?

15 posts in this topic

66 weapons fired... how many did you recognise?

 

 

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She seemed quite normal up until the T Gewehr 😀😀😀😀😀😀😀😀😀😀😀😀😀

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Her right shoulder must ache day in day out.....

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2 hours ago, Chris Boonzaier said:

Her right shoulder must ache day in day out.....

Not enough to wipe the grin off her face..

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Some of those mechanisms need a bit of oil - and she'll need to practice a bit more for the 'mad-minute'! But, impressive, and certainly nice to see those things in action. Thanks!

 

Trajan

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They really have done a good job, I would encourage those who were unfamiliar with the series to watch the full episodes.

 

I lent a couple of mine for an upcoming episode, can't wait to see it.

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So, can you tell us the title? Hopefully it is not a History Channel thing as all we get over here from that channel is those storage auction shows...

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ID: 8   Posted (edited)

 

12 hours ago, N White said:

They really have done a good job, I would encourage those who were unfamiliar with the series to watch the full episodes.

 

I lent a couple of mine for an upcoming episode, can't wait to see it.

I second that, its a good show and no need to worry. this is not History Channel.

 

Assaf

Edited by assafx

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Sorry, I assumed most would go back to check the YT source channel, or would be familiar, given the subject matter.

 

Enjoy.  Different gun every other week.  100% viewer supported.  I have no affiliation, other than lending a few rifles.

 

Primer: Small Arms History Series: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLJvsSlrbdhn5v8AuvAZuOYJ5BgEEoDdqm

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44 minutes ago, trajan said:

So, can you tell us the title? Hopefully it is not a History Channel thing as all we get over here from that channel is those storage auction shows...

Not peculiar to Turkey Trajan, that's all I see on that channel in Erin's Isle. A bit like thinking MTV is anything to do with music.

 

Dave

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Just looked at the first couple and it prompts a question. When I was in the Irish Army reserves we used bolt action and were told NEVER EVER to grip the bolt with your fist which this woman/lady (I'm not sure anymore!) does. My question is: What is the correct way to grasp the bolt? Because Irish Army drill derives a lot from the British Army I'm wondering if the thumb and forefinger only is the correct way to grasp the bolt.

 

Dave 

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ID: 12   Posted (edited)

Dave - I have never had any formal British Army training on bolt actions but I have shot them a lot and I think it might be as much to do with the nature of the rifle's action and bolt design.

In my experience, it is much harder to operate a straight-bolt (handle), Mauser derived action  (also Lebel/Nagant/Steyr etc) than an Enfield action because of the design and range of force and movement required in the bolt to chamber and eject a round (and also the cock on opening vs cock on closing difference) Certainly on many of my rifles you would need very strong thumbs and fingers indeed if you were to avoid all palming of the bolt.

Out of interest/ignorance what was the reason given for not so doing?

Chris

Edited by 4thGordons

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Thanks for that Chris.

No reason given ever as one might expect. The rifles were no. 4 Enfield but to this day I use thumb and forefinger when using a bolt  I also feed my steering wheel through my hands when driving.  Maybe I'm just too compliant!

 

Dave

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3 hours ago, 4thGordons said:

 

In my experience, it is much harder to operate a straight-bolt (handle), Mauser derived action  (also Lebel/Nagant/Steyr etc) than an Enfield action because of the design and range of force and movement required in the bolt to chamber and eject a round (and also the cock on opening vs cock on closing difference) Certainly on many of my rifles you would need very strong thumbs and fingers indeed if you were to avoid all palming of the bolt.

I would just like to add that in my experience, the WORST bolt handle is that of the Greek Mannlicher, as the short handle and huge knob offers terrible leverage, and poor purchase.  For similar reasons, the Mosin Nagant is not terribly far behind.  Obviously, mechanically, cock on close bolts are "easier" but for me at least, length of handle matters greatly.

 

Video evidence:

 

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On 7/15/2017 at 00:19, depaor01 said:

Thanks for that Chris.

No reason given ever as one might expect. The rifles were no. 4 Enfield but to this day I use thumb and forefinger when using a bolt  I also feed my steering wheel through my hands when driving.  Maybe I'm just too compliant!

 

Dave

I think you could argue that, in a well-adjusted LE action, you don't really grasp the bolt handle at all in firing. You lift and retract the bolt with the inside knuckle and first joint of the forefinger, and return it with the first joint of  the thumb. You can do this at the speed of thought, and have a new round up the spout by the time the foresight comes down out of recoil. Of course, if there's any stiffness in the action, the first effect is to require more force in manipulating the bolt, so a thumb-and-forefinger grasp might become necessary.

 

But it's always seemed unnecessary to me to come completely out of aim, and remove butt from shoulder. If you have to do that, there's more usually something missing from technique than something wrong with the rifle.

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