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chrisharley9

Zeppelin Raid - Cleethorpes, Lincs

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does any one have details of this raid please - 31 of its victims were members of the Manchester Regt & are buried in Cleethorpes Cemetery

All The Best

Chris

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I think this man might well be writing about this particular raid, in which case I would quite like more details myself.

In early April an unnamed Holmfirth soldier wrote to the Holmfirth Express describing a Zeppelin raid on the north east coast. He was walking back to his camp with an artilleryman when they heard engine noises above them, they at first believed the sound to be one of their own aircraft on patrol, heading towards Blythe. He reported that:

“We continued chatting, when there was a sudden flash and I said, ‘What the dickens are they using searchlights for?’ My mate said it was no searchlight, and a boom, as if from some battery in the distance, came up to us from the direction of the coast. Another flash and a boom; then the R. A. man said: ‘That’s not the battery, it’s that ____ airship. She’s a Zeppelin.’ Bugles could now be heard sounding in all directions. The gas was turned off at the works (a strict order) and everything everywhere seemed to be suddenly blotted off the map. Orders were given to stand to, and all who were out made all haste back to camp.

“I heard a story which I have no doubt is quite true for I have had similar experiences myself. There were between two and three hundred in the canteen, and when all the lights went out you can guess what happened. Men with empty pots got mixed up with men with full pots, and I guess there was more spilt than drank, and the orderly Sergeants shouting ‘Fall in’ etc. etc., it must have been amusing.

“Just to tell you how the news travelled here, we did not know what had really happened until we saw the morning papers, and we are only about five to six miles from where all the bombs dropped.”

It sounds like the local papers would be worth a look at if possiable to do so.

Tony.

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Thanks Tony for that - I hope to have trip up there next year

All The Best

Chris

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Chris,

This is the memorial in Cleethorpes,

http://www.poulton.info/familyhistory/War%20Memorials.htm

A description by Vernon Cook,

Zeppelin Raid over Cleethorpes Lincs

Zeppelin airship drops bombs on the resort

Just after midnight and lights had been put out in the Baptist Chapel

on Alexandra Road, where men from the Manchester Regt; had been

billeted that same day. The Zeppelin approached the town and turned,,

as if to head away over the river, then turned again and suddently

there was a flash, closely followed by others. The first was a direct

hit on the chapel, 31 N.C.O.'s and menof the 3rd Battalion were

killed. Volunteers manned the stretchers that carried the victims out

of the devasted building into the waiting ambulances and, as each one

was removed the stretchers were tipped over, leaving a stream of blood

running down the butters a Gruesome sight for those in attendence.

The commander of the German Zeppelin L21, Martin Dietrich, could not

have realised he was bombing a contingency of soldiers who were

sleeping on the floor of the chapel.

Hope this helps Charles

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Charles

Many thanks - I visited the memorial as a child as my great uncle who was killed in a trawler accident in the 1930s is buried nearby

All The Best

Chris

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Hi Chris,

I cannot add a lot more to the description from Joseph. Local legend has it that the Zeppelin followed a car which was not observing the blackout. I find it uncanny that the Zeppelin managed to bomb a military establishment, albeit a church.

I can actually see Cleethorpes cemetery gates from my front window here at home. The memorial is about 250 yards away! There is a ceremony performed every year at the memorial by the local council. There are also a few individual graves to the Manchesters in the immediate area.

If you would like any photographs, or indeed a photo of your Great Uncles grave, or if you would like me to check the newspaper archives at Grimsby please drop me a line off forum. This is not a problem,

Regards,

Steve.

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Chris

On 31 March/1 April 1916, the Germans launched a raid on London using Navy Zeppelins L9, L11, L13, L14, L15, L16, L22 and Army Zeppelins LZ90 and LZ93.

Engine trouble forced the commander of L22, Kapitänleutnant Martin Dietrich, to abandon London and to turn towards the Humber. He reached Mablethorpe at 0100 and then turned north, dropping 26 bombs on Humberstone at about 0130; he only damaged a farmhouse. L22 then dropped six high explosive bombs on Cleethorpes, killing 29 soldiers from the 3rd Manchesters who were billeted in a chapel, and wounding 53. After that, L22 crossed the coast at Spurn Head, where it was fired on by a paddle minesweeper moored in the Humber.

I hope that this helps you.

Gareth

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Hi Chris,

I cannot add a lot more to the description from Joseph. Local legend has it that the Zeppelin followed a car which was not observing the blackout. I find it uncanny that the Zeppelin managed to bomb a military establishment, albeit a church.

I can actually see Cleethorpes cemetery gates from my front window here at home. The memorial is about 250 yards away! There is a ceremony performed every year at the memorial by the local council. There are also a few individual graves to the Manchesters in the immediate area.

If you would like any photographs, or indeed a photo of your Great Uncles grave, or if you would like me to check the newspaper archives at Grimsby please drop me a line off forum. This is not a problem,

Regards,

Steve.

Steve

My great aunt used to live in Davenport Drive - I was brought up there most summer holidays - a break away from the Fens

All The Best

Chris

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Chris

On 31 March/1 April 1916, the Germans launched a raid on London using Navy Zeppelins L9, L11, L13, L14, L15, L16, L22 and Army Zeppelins LZ90 and LZ93.

Engine trouble forced the commander of L22, Kapitänleutnant Martin Dietrich, to abandon London and to turn towards the Humber. He reached Mablethorpe at 0100 and then turned north, dropping 26 bombs on Humberstone at about 0130; he only damaged a farmhouse. L22 then dropped six high explosive bombs on Cleethorpes, killing 29 soldiers from the 3rd Manchesters who were billeted in a chapel, and wounding 53. After that, L22 crossed the coast at Spurn Head, where it was fired on by a paddle minesweeper moored in the Humber.

I hope that this helps you.

Gareth

As always many thanks

Chris

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Steve

My great aunt used to live in Davenport Drive - I was brought up there most summer holidays - a break away from the Fens

All The Best

Chris

:) Know it well, you're almost a neighbour!

Steve.

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