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Fedelmar

Horses used on monuments

17 posts in this topic

As many would know the Desert Mounted Corps monument that was in Port Said was replaced/repaired and now sits atop Mt Clarence in Albany W.Australia.

During a discussion it was mentioned that if a statue of a person on a horse has both front legs in the air, the person died in battle. If the horse has one front leg in the air the person died as a result of wounds received in battle. If the horse has all four legs on the ground, the person died of natural causes.

Is this true or false?

Bright Blessings

Sandra

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Equally as many would know there is an identical monument in ANZAC Parade Canberra.

Could have sworn I saw this enquiry on another Forum n Australia.

Bright Blessings

Wendy

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This is a myth - a nice idea but not the case in a number of prominent statues. For example, Haig's statue in central London has one front foot off the ground, which should mean he died of wounds received in battle........which he didn't. This has been repeated so many times that many people now take it to be fact.

Mark

post-7757-1159601285.jpg

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Thanks for that ... being an artist I was confident that it is far more appropriate to have action in the work as oppsoed to no action :)

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It is totally false. This question is raised at least once every six months in the Scottish newspaper The Sunday Post where they go into deep analasis of where in Scotland it may be true and where it is a myth. Here is a statue of the Duke of Welly boots wearing a new form of headgear. The cone on his napper has became such an icon in Glasgow the polis don't bother taking it down now.

post-11197-1159608571.jpg

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Are the Duke, and Haig, riding stallions or mares.

Is there any significance attached to the horse's gender.

Wendy

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I would say that the Duke of Wellyboots is on a mare because many years ago I stood beside this statue for an hour waiting for a girlfriend who thought it her duty to be late and whilst waiting I never noticed the horse produce another leg. :rolleyes:. I don't know if they go into such details on statues, it's something I don't do is go round having a look to see if the horses have dangly bits or not. Sorry. No doubt some members on here will know what sex the horse is. P.M. BarrieDuncan who lives near by the and as him if its possible to place the cone somewhere else other than on the Dukes head.

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The Glasgow statue, like most if not all equestrian statues of Wellington, depicts him riding Copenhagen, the stallion that carried him all day at Waterloo. It must have been cold the day Kevin stood beside him.

Mick

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I've never heard of this one and don't believe it. I think having the horse rising up on its hind legs is a technical achievement and a great sculptor might want to show off by doing this, but the main decision was with the patron. I think Napoleon and Welly Boots were often depicted in this way and I wouldn't be surprised if there are a few Boer war monuments like this. After WWI though it wouldn't hve seemed appropriate and something more restraiend wouldbe used. I think if any sculptor had commemorated Haig in a heroic pose trampling his enemies it would have been melted down by now!

By the way the pic of Welly boots with traffic cone reminded me of another one in Glasgow, the equestrian of William of Orange at the top of High Street. I heard that the tail is weak and snapped off so many times in high winds that they eventually repaired it with a ball and socket joint. Its said that the tail now wags in high winds and has been responsible for curing a few alcoholics in its time. :D

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Are the Duke, and Haig, riding stallions or mares.

Is there any significance attached to the horse's gender.

Off at a bit of a tangent here, but I am sure I read somewhere that the statue of Haig in the market square of Montreuil shows him on a male horse (not sure it was a stallion!), whereas his favourite horse was in fact a mare called "Miss Ypres"...

Make of that what you will!

Angela

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Spare a thought for the horse too

This trooper has both feet on the ground,

but I don't think that the horse died of natural causes

[58th Division Memorial at Chipilly Ridge]

58thDivMematChipillyRidge.jpg

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i think this legs in the air rule is more of a american thing....i know that civil war statues do tend to run along these lines,but dont recall which legs do what..but they do drive on the wrong side of the road as well...

As for geldings or stallions..by the time of WW1 the idea of stallions being the better type over geldings had been long gone..i know which i'd perfer to ride..

Andy @ history horse

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Monash rides a stallion, all feet firmly on ground.

King Edward 7, stallion, right fore - hoof raised.

Earl Linlithgow, stallion, left fore - hoof raised.

Joan of Arc, Gelding, opposite fore & hind hoooves raised.

From a casual stroll thro Melbourne CBD

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Rexbro mate...did'nt the melbourne police get a call about a pervert,looking at horses Balls then.?? just think of all that wasted bronze all over the world going into such detail..

Andy

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In the church at Mells, Somerset (where Siegfried Sassoon is buried) is an equestrian statue of Lieut. E. Horner, the son and heir of the local landowner.

Lieut. Horner died of wounds, but the horse has all four feet on the ground.

Tom

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Beersheba

Police prepared to permit perusal of appendages.

Polishing of parts prosecuted as perversion

Can of Brasso {Brill} confiscated

Penalty imposed,payment pending

Peggie posing as pimpernel in parenthisis

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Rexbro

Did you count the horses' hoofs?

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