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Neil Clark

1/5th Buffs (East Kent Regiment)

33 posts in this topic

Who was your grandfather?

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On the medal card it is 9/50 but I have been told it should read be G/50.

G/50 Private Orgar Daniel

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A friend of mine who lives in Tenterden has been trying to find out which flag was hoisted in Baghdad by Colonel John Body's men in 1917

Quote

I have to say, it's making me feel disappointed and a little bit angry at the idea that material belonging to the Buffs collection - part of our proud heritage in this county, has been broken up and lost, and I'm starting to think Canterbury City Council is responsible. These sort of items are not just so much old clutter to be cleared out, handed out in some piecemeal fashion, and lost, after they have been kept safe for so many years.

Once upon a time, the sacrifice of our young men was fresh in the minds of friends and family. There was real sorrow, and tears, and pride, a human story, behind every plaque on the Cathedral wall, every flag, every document, every medal, every button, in the Buffs collection. Their sacrifice is no less for the passing of so many years and it pains me to think that the City that the Buffs once proudly called home has effectively turned it's back on it's brave young sons.

My Great Grandfather served in the Buffs in World War 1, before going off to fight in France in the Machine Gun Corp. Mr Body's ancestor led his men into battle in a distant foreign land. And today, it seems, their memories, their mementos, are held in such little regard that they can become lost, with barely a regret.

In 10, 20, 100 years time will we deny the sacrifice made by our rave men and women in 2013? Should we be any less reverent when remembering the sacrifices of generations gone by?

Does Canterbury Cathedral share my disappointment that they have a plaque on the wall, but the flag that goes with it, that hung reverently in that sacred space for so long, has now been lost?

I hope that something can be done to try and track down this particular item, and any other things that have been lost since the Beaney Institute was revamped.

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Thought that forum Buffs buffs might want to see this rare photo of what appears to be a war memorial at Kamptee India where the 5th Buffs were at during the first few months of the Great War. As far as I know this is the first time it has been documented and this photo is the only one of it's kind in existance. Any information regarding it would be helpful. Does it still survive? If not then what happened to it?

Neil

I am fairly sure that this was one of my grandfather's photos (Edward Boulding of D Company 1/5th The Buffs). I uploaded it many, many years ago along with another photo of a man with bowed head digging the graves (for the same men). Somewhere I have it (and many more) but having moved and with my wife "tidying" I can't immediately lay my hands on them. After uploading it to the internet many years ago I was contacted by someone who knew van Campbell's daughter and who showed her the photos. She had never known her father.

Later: I have just found the original post "It's two photos, one of a tombstone and a second photo' of a soldier standing and taking his solar tepee off in front of a series of graves marked with wooden crosses."

Also some more can be found here: http://web.archive.org/web/20060317161925/http://www.digiserve.com/peter/buffs/contr2.htm

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Greetings to everyone here and to Susan F for kindly advising me of the fact this thread has been reserected from the dead.

My feeling regarding the early movement of these men from India is that they were a kind of PIONEER element of 1/5 Buffs.

Their job was probably to carry out work before the rest of the battalion arrived.

These men were probably valued members of the battalion who posessed unusual/hard to find skills. It would be interesting to see exactly what kind of work these men did before engagement?

A couple of names of the list jog my memory although I can't remember exactly which KENT civic war memorial their names are on. I think William BRUNGER was an Ashford man (therefore close to my heart).

The name BODY also jogs my memory too. Have a look at my work at CRUNDALE/WYE regarding JAMES GLEAVE DFC

I suspect they must have been led by a junior Buffs officer (Lt or Captain probably).

Apart from this, I can't really think of a reason why a small (but select) band of men would be sent a great distance before the battalion arrived.

Perhaps my good friend Dave Hughes will be able to help out regarding the reason these men arrived so early? If anyone knows it's likely to be him.....

Hi I have just been sent another large group photo of the 1/5 thBuffs in Mesopotamia. It is not mine so am awaiting permission and I will then be able to post . How do I look at your CRUNDALE/WYE regarding JAMES GLEAVE DFC article please? Thanks ivor (Body)

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Hi, I originally posted this in POWs but then found this topic:

I am looking for information on Pte Samuel (Sammy) Kemp 1769 L11810 The Buffs. He was taken prisoner in Mesopotamia and worked in a salt mine, therefore I assume he was 1/5th Battn. He joined before the war as a Boy Bugler about 1912 (born 1898 Wye, Kent). To confuse matters we believe he was born Sammy Jones and took his stepfathers name.

His medal card shows he deserted 25/7/19 but he was never pursued. I have been told he may have re enlisted in April/May 1919 hence the later number.

Unfortunately no service record has come to light so any information would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks, Nigel

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On 11/04/2007 at 00:48, Neil Clark said:

Thought that forum Buffs buffs might want to see this rare photo of what appears to be a war memorial at Kamptee India where the 5th Buffs were at during the first few months of the Great War. As far as I know this is the first time it has been documented and this photo is the only one of it's kind in existance. Any information regarding it would be helpful. Does it still survive? If not then what happened to it?

Neil

kamptee2.jpg

 

This photo was uploaded by me many, many years ago to a family history bulletin board (ie pre Internet). It's one of my grandfather's collection of Mespot photos. I have the original.

 

My grandfather was Capt. Edward Boulding 1/5th Buffs who was wounded at Sheik Sa'ad, the relief of Kut, on 7th Jan 1916. Happily he survived. He spent time in India, followed by Mespotamia and Persia. As I understand it he was a great friend of Col. Body.

 

The attached photo shows Baghdad Signal School July 1918. My grandfather, Edward Boulding, is 2nd from right standing. I think he was Lieutenant at the time.

 

The names of the people are:

 

Sergt Brown, Corp. Shelley, Hardie Tomkin Miller Reeves CQMS Blunt ??? Chimes Teape Hayes Boulding Serg Paine

Rippon Marriot Marwood (Instructor British) Worsdell (Commandant) Sellick (Instructor Indians) Dawson Salmon

SignalsSchoolBaghdad.png

EdwardBoulding.jpg

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There is a new book out about the Mespotamian theatre written by Major Paul Knight. It has, alas, only been printed in the States as he couldn't find a UK publisher. It's a very fine read indeed. I hadn't realied that Mespotamia was far worse then the trenches in France.I really recommend this well researched book. Rather pricey at $45 alas. I bought mine direct from the authour at a more reaonable price.

 

The British Army in Mesopotamia, 1914-1918

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