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What are Chevrons


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#1 Biggles

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Posted 26 July 2008 - 05:51 PM

A relative has just shown me a document "Discharge Certificate" of my Grandfathers.
Under the section "Medals, Clasps, Decorations & Mentions in Dispatches" it lists the following:

1914 Star
British War Medal
Victory Medal
Wound Stripe one
Chevrons Red one
Chevrons Blue one

What are the chevrons & what do they denote?

I have posted this document at: http://www.flickr.co...ins/2704386882/ should anyone care to see it in full.

Another document has no title & is here: http://www.flickr.co...ins/2704386882/ Does this card relate to "Mentioned in Dispatches"?

Peter (Ont., Canada)

#2 truthergw

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Posted 26 July 2008 - 05:58 PM

Chevrons are 'V' shaped stripes worn with the point up. In this case, on his forearm. The wound stripe was a vertical bar, again worn on the forearm.

#3 1st east yorks

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Posted 26 July 2008 - 06:05 PM

Peter,
These chevrons refer to active service overseas:
The red chevron represents 1914.
The first blue chevron represents 1915.
There are also second,third and fourth blue chevrons which represent 1916,1917, and 1918 respectively.They are worn on the lower right arm if i remember rightly.

Anthony.

#4 Wainfleet

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Posted 26 July 2008 - 07:15 PM

Peter

As Anthony has pointed out, the red service chevron is for 1914. The blue chevron is for a subsequent year - it's not necessarily 1915; he might for instance have been wounded in 1914 and only returned to the front in 1918 - but I agree that the likelihood is that he was out in 1914 and 1915, was wounded some time in 1915 and became unfit for frontline service, and served at home for the remainder of the war.

Regards,

W.

#5 Droocoo

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Posted 26 July 2008 - 10:40 PM

chevrons are v shaped stripes denoting rank up until i think it's liutenant. Worn on the arm.

#6 jay dubaya

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Posted 27 July 2008 - 01:38 AM

Hi Peter, here are a couple of examples of overseas service chevrons which were worn on the lower right and wound stripes which were worn on the lower left,

Attached File  Overseas_Stripes.jpg   27.75KB   6 downloads

Attached File  wound_20stripe.jpg   37.78KB   2 downloads



#7 brett361975

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Posted 27 July 2008 - 10:15 AM

QUOTE (Droocoo @ Jul 26 2008, 11:40 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
chevrons are v shaped stripes denoting rank up until i think it's liutenant. Worn on the arm.



I think you have the wrong type of Chevron old bean, as you will notice on the thread it mentions the different colours, and as explained above these are for different years of service. As far as I am aware the rank chevrons you mention tend to be all the same colour to show a soldiers rank.

It might be worth mentioning your idea of different couloured rank Stripes / Chevrons to the "Powers that be" we could then have a very colourful and pretty army.

Regards
Brett

#8 1st east yorks

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Posted 27 July 2008 - 10:17 AM

Wainfleet,
I assumed 1915 for the blue chevron,but your right,it could represent any of the subsequent years.Your answer is also a possibility.
Anthony.

#9 1st AIF

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Posted 27 July 2008 - 11:01 AM

Hello all,

My view is that a red chevron was awarded for those that embarked for active service prior to the end of 1914. A blue chevron was awarded at the start of each anniversary of subsequent years abroad. So if your man was entitled to one red and one blue that would tell me that he embarked in 1914, had at least a year overseas but not more than two. Which means he was outed between August 1915 and August 1916. I don't see much evidence that chevrons were treasured much by the troops - there is very little mentioned about them in any literature that I have read. Chevrons are also uncommon in portrait photos. Chevrons were not awarded if the soldier had bad conduct - however I can find no evidence that this was enforced.

The chevrons are actually my avatar!!

Len

#10 Joe Sweeney

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Posted 27 July 2008 - 04:07 PM

Peter,

The red was awarded if point of service started before 31 Dec 1914, the next award was an aggregate of 12 months later. These stripes were instituted in Jan. 1918 abnde the rule set is below.


AO 4 1918 is paraphrased below:

The date of award of the first Chevron was that on which the individual left the UK, or in the case of those serving abroad at the outbreak of war, 5 August 1914. For Overseas troops, the first chevron was awarded on the date of leaving their own country or were employed on local operations. Further Chevrons were awarded for each succesive aggregate period of 12 months. One month of leave was permitted in calculation. If first point of service was before 31 Dec 1914 a red chevron was awarded after 1 Jan 1915 all were blue.

There are more rules and ammendments with the army orders assoctiated with these chevron's etc. At first PoW time was not counted and this was ammended.

A man who had a red and two blue chevrons, shows that he had 24 months of service overseas starting in 1914. This is calculated by time served overseas and not the year excepting service before 31 December 1914 earned the man a red chevron for his first. The award of the blue chevron came after an aggregate of twelve qualifying months later and not just because 1915 was the next calendar year. A man with one red and 2 blue chevrons could very well have only been authorized these chevrons even though he served for 1914, 1915, 1916, 1917 and 1918 in France but his accumulated time was only 24 months.

Len,

As far as misconduct I believe you may be confusing criteria with Overseas Chevrons and Good Conduct Badges which were chevrons worn on the lower left sleeve.

Joe Sweeney



#11 Tonyf

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Posted 28 August 2008 - 12:24 PM

After many years of searching AIF records I have only come across one record that mentions chevrons, which I understand were awarded for years served abroad from the date of departure ex Oz. The record is undated but the dates either side straddle the date of departure, it reads "TWO Blue chevrons due"