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Pulpits as war memorials


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#1 MichaelBully

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Posted 08 June 2010 - 07:17 PM

I have been interested to find examples of the less usual war memorials. At St. Andrews Church , Waterloo Street, Hove, there is a pulpit as a war memorial.

The website mentions that
"The octagonal wooden pulpit with baroque sounding board was given by Fr Kirkley as a memorial to his brother Frank, killed in the First World War."
Fr. Kirkley was the minister at the time.

http://www.visitstan...rg/history5.htm

The photo was taken by Arnie Spence, Friends of St. Andrews Church.

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#2 Nigel Marshall

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Posted 08 June 2010 - 07:36 PM

This is the Choir Screen in Christ Church, in Harrogate, North Yorkshire. It was erected by the Reverend Guy as a thanksgiving for the privilege of having five members of his family serving with the forces. It includes Basil Guy VC. As such it is not a war memorial, but is still an unusual thing.



The somewhat over-exposed accompanying photo gives brief details of each member of the family who was serving. I believe the inscription at the foot of the frame states that the piece was inscribed by one of the Guy sisters.



Cheers,

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#3 spoons

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Posted 08 June 2010 - 07:55 PM

Can't say I have seen a pulpit but I have seen various items of church furniture and fittings including pulpit, altar, altar rail, rood screen and chairs. See below for an example from St Margaret's Episcopal church in New Galloway. If anyone can tell me why these two Australians (Peel and Ethel) are commemorated here I would be grateful as I have not found a local connection.

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#4 daggers

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Posted 08 June 2010 - 08:11 PM

We have a grand organ case at our church, given by the father of a young officer in his memory. It is sited in what was then a new extension to the chancel.
D


#5 MartinWills

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Posted 08 June 2010 - 08:14 PM

St Germains in Birmingham has an organ as memorial - with names on the casework.

Several Churches in Northampton have various parts such as screens rails etc as memorials a s well. I suspect therefore it is not uncommon.

#6 ianjonescl

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Posted 08 June 2010 - 08:30 PM

NewcastleSt Andrews, Newgate Street Lectern Oficers and men of 1st and 2nd Reserve Brigade RFA Newcastle Barracks RFA

#7 vollketten

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Posted 08 June 2010 - 08:35 PM

In Prudhoe, Northumberland, St.Mary Maddelene (C of E) church has a wooden gate covering under the arch of which are enscribed the names of local war heroes who died in action. Unusually they are on wooden boards and sadly damaged by mindless morons a few years ago who carved their own names into them.
(Its hard to find the words for such people...)
Thankfully they have been restored. Another is at St.John Lee, Acomb, Northumberland but these are on stone tablets under the archway.

#8 June Underwood

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Posted 08 June 2010 - 10:43 PM

In Bucks we have found names at Cadmore End on a brass canopy above the font; at Colnbrook names are painted round a pillar; Bledlow Ridge has names on a brass panel at the base of the lecturn (it took 3 visits and a phone call to the vicar to find where the names were recorded) and an outstanding altar frontal can be found at Stewkley embroidered by the mother and sister of 2 officers. They used the material from the sister's wedding gown and used their own hair to embroidere the hair of the angels, who represented the two brothers. Ickford has a candelabra dedicated to EV Staley, the son of the Rector.

All these can be found on our website.

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#9 LesCroft

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Posted 08 June 2010 - 10:51 PM

All the wood panelling behind the altar at St Marys Church in Droylsden Manchester is dedicated and carved in the memory of a soldier, all the other parishioners who died during the war are carved into the panels.

#10 Susan F

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Posted 10 June 2010 - 01:14 AM

The Advanced Search of UKNIWM can sort by county and type. Using this shows that Brighton has a reredos, font, alter rail, lectern and table in various different churches.

Susan


#11 spoons

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Posted 10 June 2010 - 12:20 PM

It really does take a good time to check a church for memorials. I have found Rolls of Honour underneath a bench, plaques in a closed off organ loft and inscribed brass vases which are only brought out for services. There is one font where the inscription is under a locked cover so is only normally on display at christenings.

Or how about this for a candidate for the smallest memorial (admittedly it is for Malaya and so off topic) but it is a box used for flowers and only a few inches in size.

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#12 MichaelBully

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Posted 10 June 2010 - 07:47 PM

Thank you very much for all the examples and photos that have been posted. Much appreciated. I might be doing a talk at St Andrews , Waterloo Street, Hove about 'Hove, the Great War , and Saint Andrews church', probably Rememberance Day itself, but to be confirmed. It's helpful to have other examples of how rememberance memorial appear in many different forms, besides the standard plaques and stone .
It is quite moving to think how the Minister seemed keen to ensure that his brother would be so prominently remembered in the church, the pulpit being an obvious focal point.

#13 spoons

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Posted 10 June 2010 - 08:02 PM

Good luck with the talk, PM me if you would like any examples outwith Hove, I have quite a few photos. Also note that nobody has mentioned staind glass windows, there are a few of those.

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#14 MichaelBully

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Posted 12 June 2010 - 05:10 PM

A kind offer Spoons, appreciated. Will contact you soon via PM.

Yes good point about stained glass, Terry has already placed a photo of a stained glass Great War memorial at Saint Barnabas Church, Hove
on another thread.
http://1914-1918.inv...i...eroes&st=50


QUOTE (spoons @ Jun 10 2010, 09:02 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Good luck with the talk, PM me if you would like any examples outwith Hove, I have quite a few photos. Also note that nobody has mentioned staind glass windows, there are a few of those.

\Spoons


#15 tharkin56

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Posted 12 June 2010 - 08:34 PM

In coventry cathedral three local dignatories paid for a memorial altar and choir screens for their boys who died in the great war all destroyed in the blitz november 1940.

#16 Michael Pegum

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Posted 12 June 2010 - 08:54 PM

QUOTE (Susan F @ Jun 10 2010, 02:14 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
The Advanced Search of UKNIWM can sort by county and type. Using this shows that Brighton has a reredos, font, alter rail, lectern and table in various different churches.
Susan

All of these are by no means rare, and stained glass windows also.

This is an unusual one, from Cashel Cathedral: the cushion on the pew seat. Perhaps it would win the prize for the most comfortable memorial.

Michael
Attached File  Moore.jpg   96.95KB   0 downloads

#17 Paul21455

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Posted 12 June 2010 - 10:06 PM

QUOTE (Michael Pegum @ Jun 12 2010, 09:54 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
All of these are by no means rare, and stained glass windows also.

This is an unusual one, from Cashel Cathedral: the cushion on the pew seat. Perhaps it would win the prize for the most comfortable memorial.

Michael
Attached File  Moore.jpg   96.95KB   0 downloads



"killed by his loving nephew"? blink.gif




#18 Michael Pegum

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Posted 13 June 2010 - 11:19 AM

QUOTE (Paul21455 @ Jun 12 2010, 11:06 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
"killed by his loving nephew"? blink.gif


Quite right. There should be commas after "Cashel" and "1918". Then it would be obvious, if it wasn't already, that the nephew gave the cushion, and didn't kill his uncle.

Have you read "Eats, shoots and leaves"?

Michael



#19 ShropshireMad

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Posted 13 June 2010 - 11:29 AM

There's a pulpit memorial at Edgmond, Shropshire. It's the only one i can recall from the county.

Neil