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Titanic and beyond


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#1 Will I Davies

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Posted 02 June 2011 - 06:19 AM

Hi All,

I was just thinking...

The former surviving crew of the Titanic, or indeed anyone that was involved in her construction, did any of these serve or die during active service in WW1 in any capacity?

Regards
Will

#2 headgardener

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Posted 02 June 2011 - 06:58 AM

Must have done. The ships Captain was in the RNR, and I guess that a lot of the other officers and men would have been. I'm pretty sure that 1st Officer Lightoller served in the RNR during WW1.

About 15-20 years ago I met a lady whose father (or maybe grandfather...?) was a seaman on the Titanic, name of Fitzpatrick I think, who joined up at the start of the war and served as an infantryman on the western front. I'm pretty sure that I tracked his MIC down, but can't remember any details.

#3 Gibbo

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Posted 02 June 2011 - 09:08 AM

Charles Lightoller did serve in the RN during WWI and was awarded the DSC and bar.. In WWII he took his own pleasure craft, the Sundowner, to Dunkirk. The following is an extract from his biography on The website Encyclopedia Titanica

[i]In 1913, following the American Senate Inquiry and the British Inquiry, Lightoller returned to sea as First Officer of the Oceanic. On August 4th 1914, the Great War began and the R.M.S. Oceanic became H.M.S. Oceanic, armed merchant cruiser, while First Officer Lightoller of White Star Lines became Lieutenant Lightoller of the Royal Navy. Oceanic had two captains, a Royal Navy skipper, Captain William Slayter, and Captain Henry Smith, who had been the commander of the Oceanic for the last two years. She was put on Northern Patrol. Her job was to patrol a 150-mile stretch of water in the area of the Shetland Islands. The 17,000 ton, 700ft vessel was far to big and totally unsuited for the waters in which she was sailing. On September 8th 1914, as a result of her unstable command and unsuitable role, she ran aground on the Shaalds near the island of Foula. Lightoller was off watch and in his cabin at the time. Once again he found himself supervising the lowering and loading of lifeboats. Three weeks later the Oceanic broke up in a storm and was gone.

Lightoller's next assignment was to the Campania, a 13,000 ton Cunard liner converted to seaplane carrier. Lights now found himself as the observer in a Short 184 seaplane. In June 1915, during a Grand Fleet exercise off Iceland, he was the observer on the only plane able to get into the air. They located the Blue Fleet, and for the first time in history, a plane sent up by a fleet at sea succeeded in locating an enemy fleet.

[i]Just before Christmas 1915 Lightoller got his own command, the torpedo boat HMTB 117. During his tour with this boat, on 31 July 1916, Lightoller attacked the Zeppelin L31 with the ships Hotchkiss guns. For his actions Lightoller was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross and he was also promoted to commander of the torpedo-boat-destroyer Falcon.

On 1 April 1918, Lightoller was again off watch, laying in his bunk, when the Falcon collided with the trawler John Fitzgerald. She stayed afloat for a few hours, eventually sinking just about same time, six years to the day as the Titanic sinking.

Lightoller was now given a new command, the destroyer Garry. On 19 July 1918, they rammed and sank the German submarine UB-110. The ramming damaged the bows of the Garry so badly that she had to steam 100 miles in reverse to relieve the strain on the forward bulkheads as she returned to port for repairs. For this action Lightoller was awarded a bar to his DSC and promoted to Lieutenant-Commander.

At the end of 1918, Lightoller came out of the Royal Navy as a full Commander. On his return to White Star he was appointed Chief Officer of the Celtic having been passed over for a position on the Olympic, the new management wanted to forget the Titanic and all those associated with her. None of the surviving officers from the Titanic ever got their own commands. Lightoller was not interested in remaining Chief Officer of the Celtic indefinitely, so, after well over 20 years of service Lightoller resigned from White Star Line.


#4 Gibbo

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Posted 02 June 2011 - 09:20 AM

PS: The website linked in my posting above has a list of everybody on board Titanic when she sank. It includes a mess steward called Charles William Fitzpatrick who survived; no further details of his life are given/

#5 Will I Davies

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Posted 02 June 2011 - 11:02 PM

PS: The website linked in my posting above has a list of everybody on board Titanic when she sank. It includes a mess steward called Charles William Fitzpatrick who survived; no further details of his life are given/



Hi Martin,

Thanks its an interesting link, will be having more of a look when I have the time.

Thanks
Will

#6 Will I Davies

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Posted 03 June 2011 - 07:41 PM

Hi All,

Having checked out the Titanic link sent to me I have found one survivor so far that served in WW1

Mr Joseph Groves Boxhall was born in Hull, Yorkshire, on March 23,1884. He was the fourth officer on board Titanic at the time of the sinking and was in charge of lifeboat No 2 during the disaster and was eventually rescued by the Carpathia.

Following his return to England, he joined the Adriatic as her Fourth Officer. In the pre-war years he joined the Royal Naval Reserve (RNR) as a Sub-Lieutenant and was promoted to Lieutenant in 1915. He served on cruisers, a torpedo boat and a shore base. In the post-war years he was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant Commander.

If anybody has any more information on him I would be most grateful.

Regards
Will



#7 Will I Davies

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Posted 03 June 2011 - 08:54 PM

PS: The website linked in my posting above has a list of everybody on board Titanic when she sank. It includes a mess steward called Charles William Fitzpatrick who survived; no further details of his life are given/


I have found one lucky survivor that did not survive WW1.


BULEY, EDWARD JOHNInitials:E JNationality:United KingdomRank:Able SeamanRegiment/Service:Royal NavyUnit Text:(RFR/PO/B/5041). H.M.S. "Partridge."Age:32Date of Death:12/12/1917Service No:213566Additional information:Son of the late John Buley, of Southampton.Casualty Type:Commonwealth War DeadGrave/Memorial Reference:24.Memorial:PORTSMOUTH NAVAL MEMORIAL



Will

#8 Andrew Upton

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Posted 04 June 2011 - 02:10 PM

Having checked out the Titanic link sent to me I have found one survivor so far that served in WW1

Mr Joseph Groves Boxhall...If anybody has any more information on him I would be most grateful.


If you Google his name there is quite a bit of additional information on the web, pictures, his account of the Titanic sinking, later career, etc etc.

#9 Will I Davies

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Posted 06 June 2011 - 10:46 PM

Hi All,

I was just thinking...

The former surviving crew of the Titanic, or indeed anyone that was involved in her construction, did any of these serve or die during active service in WW1 in any capacity?

Regards
Will



After further research I have come across two further survivors that served in WW1, The first was 1 st class passenger William B. Greenfield who was born New York 1888 and served with the US forces and suvived the war. I have no information on his regiment or his duties during this time.

The other was a Mr Reginald Hardwick, 21, born in HampshireSigned-on to the Titanic, on 6 April 1912, and gave his address as 4 Heysham Road, (Southampton).

The Titanic was his first ship. Hardwick was rescued (possibly in lifeboat 13).steward on the Titanic

He served in WW1 but did not survive

HARDWICK, REGINALDInitials:RNationality:United KingdomRank:PrivateRegiment/Service:Army Service CorpsUnit Text:M.T.Age:27Date of Death:04/03/1918Service No:M/350600Additional information:Husband of Elsie S. Cobb (formerly Hardwick), of 22, Railway Avenue, Creswell.Casualty Type:Commonwealth War DeadGrave/Memorial Reference:Near North-East corner of Churchyard.Cemetery:CRESWELL (ST. MARY MAGDALENE) CHURCHYARD

Will





#10 Auditman

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Posted 18 June 2011 - 06:06 AM

This thread rang a bell.
Violet Bell was a nurse / steward on the White Star "Olympic" when it collided with a warship in 1911; she was given a baby to look after when she took to a lifeboat on the "Titanic" and she was a nurse that survived the sinking of the "Britannic" when serving as a hospital ship after it hit a mine in 1916.
She got the White Star Line set, continued to work for the line and died in 1971

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#11 hesmond

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Posted 18 June 2011 - 09:03 AM

Also with aTitanic link the iconic photo of the young boy selling news papers with the front sheet TITANIC LOST went on to serve in the ASC in the Great War won a MM and was killed in action , so if any one sees a MM and pair ASC to William Moffet , it may be just a bit more intresting .
Also i belive the lookout who first spotted the ice berg saw service in the Great war he finally commited sucide in the 50s ,and around 3 years ago a excellent trio and paperwork sold on e bay to one of the sailors in charge of a Titanic life boat it reached 7000.

#12 roel22

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Posted 18 June 2011 - 01:02 PM

Also with aTitanic link the iconic photo of the young boy selling news papers with the front sheet TITANIC LOST went on to serve in the ASC in the Great War won a MM and was killed in action , so if any one sees a MM and pair ASC to William Moffet , it may be just a bit more intresting .


The only Moffetts I can find on CWGC were 33 and 32 when they were KIA in 1916, so hardly boys when Titanic sank...

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#13 CGM

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Posted 18 June 2011 - 01:09 PM

His name, I believe, was Ned Parfett.

See his story here

#14 CGM

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Posted 18 June 2011 - 01:20 PM

This would be his CWGC entry:

Name:
PARFETT, EDWARD JOHN
Initials:E J
Nationality:United Kingdom
Rank:Gunner
Regiment/Service:Royal Field Artillery
Unit Text:126th Bty. 29th Bde.
Age:22
Date of Death:29/10/1918
Service No:128981
Awards:M M, Mentioned in Despatches
Additional information:Son of George and Honorah Parfett, of 50, Ethelm St., Cornwall Rd., Lambeth, London.
Casualty Type:Commonwealth War Dead
Grave/Memorial Reference:D. 9.
Cemetery: VERCHAIN BRITISH CEMETERY. VERCHAIN-MAUGRE


#15 hesmond

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Posted 18 June 2011 - 02:33 PM

Hi yes my mistake i first read the name in a old copy of a Titanic related magazine about 15 years ago athe the old mind aint what it was



#16 roel22

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Posted 18 June 2011 - 03:31 PM

A sad story nonetheless...

#17 CGM

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Posted 18 June 2011 - 03:53 PM

Yes indeed. Very sad.
Thank you for reminding me hesmond. It has to be a part of any story of the Titanic and the Great War.

#18 domwalsh

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Posted 30 December 2011 - 05:36 PM

Yup, Ned Parfett was the young newspaper vendor. My Great Uncle Ned, fondly remembered

#19 Mark Hone

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Posted 30 December 2011 - 05:58 PM

What were the circumstances of his death? My great-uncle, Old Contemptible Private John Hone of 1st Royal Warwicks was fatally wounded at Verchain-Maugre on 24/10/18 although he is buried at St Souplet. I visited the village in 1988 on the WFA 'Victory' tour, coincidentally described on another current thread.

#20 domwalsh

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Posted 03 January 2012 - 06:16 PM

He was killed five days after your great-uncle when a shell dropped on the stores room. Tragic that they should die so close to the end of hostilities.

#21 ph0ebus

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Posted 07 January 2012 - 03:15 AM

Another 'event' to mark the 100th Anniversary:

Titanic Artifacts Up For Auction

:angry2:

-Daniel

#22 khaki

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Posted 07 January 2012 - 11:21 AM

My g/fathers uncles/cousins etc were all involved with the Titanic in a way as they made the anchor chains, there is a well known photo of Ben Hodgetts and crew as they make the chain. I think they are all named and at least two of his son's are with him in the crew. I believe that he also made the chains for the Lusitania as well. They lived in Cradley Heath, Midlands, I doubt if they were in the war although another son Joseph Hodgetts was in the Worcestershire Regt. (don't know anything about his service). I would have thought that the chain making members of the family would have been exempt as a reserved occupation
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#23 Simon_Fielding

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Posted 07 January 2012 - 12:32 PM

Ancestry have pension records of a Joseph Hodgetts b. abt 1892, Birth Parish: Cradley, Birth County: Worcestershire, Document Year: 1914
Regimental Number: 18578 Regiment Name: Worcestershire Regiment

Seems to have been discharged unfit for service in November 1914 - might this be your relative?

#24 Simon_Fielding

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Posted 07 January 2012 - 12:34 PM

There's also a medal card for 12401 Pte Joseph W Hodgetts 4th Bn served Gallipoli also discharged...

#25 khaki

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Posted 08 January 2012 - 12:41 AM

Thanks Simon, I believe there is two Josephs Hodgetts of the Worcestershire Regt, the only things that I know about "Joseph" is that he was born 1873? Cradley Heath, occupation shopkeeper/butcher, died 1940, there is a photograph of him that I have seen c1925 at his parents anniversary, he is wearing a Worcestershire Regt uniform with recognisable cap and collar badges. Anecdotal information suggests the war effected him badly (no surprises there) wife's name Fanny??The photo shows him with what appear to be long service stripes (4) just above the cuff of each arm. No service ribbons are evident, his uniform fits him well and doesn't have the look of something he was issued ten years before. Has the look of a serving soldier, (maybe) I have really hit a brick walI with a positive id, I wish I could add more detail but nothing else is known.The Hodgetts were related to the Hingley family also of Cradley Heath, and I am sure that some of them must have served at some time as well. I am not really up with family tree research all I know is names etc.
Anyway thank you for your interest.
khaki