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Railway lines for the battlefields?


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#1 vlasidis

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Posted 05 December 2011 - 12:16 PM

I 've read most ofthe topics here. There is a huge amount of information for Salonika Front but Ihaven 't seen much about the railway lines that British, French, Serbians, adthe Germans had built in order to facilitate the transportation with the trenchs.

As far as I know the British Army had built a normal line (143 cm) fromSalamanli (now Galliko) to Giouvesna (Assiros) . The line continued from Giouvesnato Sarakli (now Iraklia). From there, there was a 60 cm. railway line toStavros and Tazli Dermend (Orfanos Gulf) which was used as a normal railway linetill the end of WWII.

Other 60 cm. lines were built from Ligovani to Mirovi and from Kopriva (nowHimarros) to Dimitrici and Gudeli (Vamvakussa) just behind the Struma valleyfront. There was also a 60 cm line from Vetrina (Neo Petritsi) to Rupel fort(now Klidi).

Near Vardar valley a 60 cm line was built by the British Army from Sarigiol(now Kristoni near Kilkis) to Snevce (32,6 Km) and from Snevce to Karmoudli(3,85 Km), another one from Sarigiol to Yanes (now Metallikon). British Armyhad also built a 60 cm line from Mirovo to Lingovani (now Xiloupolis).

Karasouli(Polykastron) was a central transport center. The Allies had built a 60 cm linefrom Karasouli to Orehovica (now Pefkodasos). Another line was built from Karasoulito Boemica (Axioupolis) and Koupa.

The most well knownline, built by the Serbian Army was that from Vertekop (Skydra to Subotcko(Aridea) 28,9 km total.

Contrary to that therailway line that was built by French from Mesonisi to Florina and Armensko (Alona) and to Pisoderi isnot well known. From Mesonisi to Armensko there was a normal 60 cm line andfrom there to Pisoderi the line was aerial. These are the only information wehave for that line. We don t have photographs, or a map of the line.

I would be verygrateful to anyone that has more information or photographs for this line.

#2 vlasidis

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Posted 05 December 2011 - 12:24 PM

Here is a photo from these railway lines. Former railway station at Apsalos (Vertekop-Subotsko line) and two original wagonettes from WWI era.

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#3 Rockdoc

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Posted 13 December 2011 - 01:08 PM

There was another 60cm line from near Causica to Janes. In Under The Devil's Eye, it is recorded as being used to move casualties from hospitals in the valleys north of the Karasouli-Kilindir branch line to a larger hospital. The 60cm line from Stavros to Tasli was intended to be standard gauge but the British could not obtain enough equipment. Decauville equipment became available and was used instead.

Keith

#4 vlasidis

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Posted 18 December 2011 - 09:34 PM

There was another 60cm line from near Causica to Janes. In Under The Devil's Eye, it is recorded as being used to move casualties from hospitals in the valleys north of the Karasouli-Kilindir branch line to a larger hospital. The 60cm line from Stavros to Tasli was intended to be standard gauge but the British could not obtain enough equipment. Decauville equipment became available and was used instead.

Keith



Thank you very much for the information. I' ve discovered that two locomotives of that time that were used in Skydra-Aridea line still exist in Greece. A French one is in Athens and an American one is in Volos railway station. Both of them in pretty bad condition.

But I 've very limited information for the lines in Bitola area. I' ve seen only one photograph in French archives and nothing else near the current villages. I believe that I have to wait till the spring in order to travel to Kenali and to Cerna reka.

Vlasis

#5 Rockdoc

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Posted 18 December 2011 - 09:42 PM

The Austro-Hungarian maps for the Salonika front which are available HERE free, were updated during the war. There is an index at the bottom of this page that tells you the date of the last revision. You can see a line to the Langaza area on Map 41-41 that was built from Ambarkoi the Constantinople line.

Keith

#6 RobL

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Posted 22 December 2011 - 07:32 PM

At the Moseley Railway Trust (not too far from you Rockdoc) is this H class water wagon as used on the 2 foot railways. It was built at Darlington in 1917, and it's known to have been built for Salonika as parts are stamped 'selrail'

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There's no doubt several more images in one or more of the superb 'Narrow Gauge at War' volumes. I also have a copy of an IWM image of Scottish troops on the light railway in Salonika if of interest

#7 Rockdoc

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Posted 22 December 2011 - 10:40 PM

Great post, Rob. I must try and get there next year.

Keith

#8 MartinWills

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Posted 21 May 2012 - 10:13 PM

I might add that the principal source on light railways is WJK Davies volume "Light Railways of World War 1" published in the 1960's. It is not exhaustive, but is the best general single source of info. The big downside is that it is as rare as hens teeth.



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