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Kil class gunboats


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#1 Phil Wood

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Posted 23 January 2012 - 09:31 PM

I am looking at the career of a stoker who served out of HMS Idaho (Milford Haven) and then HMS Eaglet (Liverpool) on what appears to have been a Kil class gunboat called Kildorrey. Can anyone confirm that the Kil class included a Kildorrey?

#2 Grantowi

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Posted 23 January 2012 - 09:42 PM

Smith's Dock


Kil-class patrol gunboats Kildary, Kildorough, Kilfenora, Kilgobnet, Kilclare, Kilchrenan, Kildavin, Kildorrey, Kilfullert, Kilkeel, Kilcock, Kildimo, Kildysart, Kilgarvan, Kilchreest, Kilham, Killena, Killerig, Killiney, Killour, Killowen, Killybegs, Killygordon, Kilmacolm, Kilmacrennan, Kilmaine, Kilmallock, Kilmanahan, Kilmarnock, Kilmartin, Kilmead, Kilmelford, Kilmersdon, Kilmington, Kilmore, Kilmuckridge, Kilmun


Z-type patrol craft Arctic Whale, Balena, Beluga, Blackwhale, Bowhead, Bullwhale, Cachalot, Cowwhale, Finwhale, Humpback, Icewhale, Pilotwhale, Rightwhale, Rorqual, Zedwhale (all launched 1915)


117S. Smith's Dock Co. Ltd, South Bank, Middlesbrough, Yorkshire - mercantile, plus all trawlers building at outbreak of war, 15 submarine chasers to a yard design, 40 minesweepers, 36 Kil class patrol boats (plus 4,000 ships repaired)

Borrowed from - http://www.naval-his...Shipbuild02.htm

Grant


#3 Phil Wood

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Posted 23 January 2012 - 10:04 PM

Thanks for the rapid response - and the link.

#4 Lancashire Fusilier

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Posted 23 January 2012 - 10:08 PM

Phil,
Attached are 2 excellent photographs of WW1 Kil Class Gunboats as was the Kildorrey.
Great examples of naval camo.
The Kildorrey appears to have been constructed on 14/2/18 and is recorded as having been sold out of service on 14/2/20
Hope this helps.

Attached Files



#5 Lancashire Fusilier

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Posted 23 January 2012 - 10:31 PM

Phil,
There is a record of a Stoker First Class, a James H. Allen K29689, who died while serving on the Kildorrey on Friday, December 6, 1918 of the influenza.

#6 Lancashire Fusilier

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Posted 23 January 2012 - 10:59 PM

Phil,
Here as another WW1 Kil Class Gunboat without the naval camo.

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#7 Lancashire Fusilier

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Posted 25 January 2012 - 02:41 AM

Phil,
The 2 Kil Class Gunboats pictured in my post No.4 are apparently painted in what is known as " Dazzle-painting ".
From the beginning of WW1 schemes had been submitted to the Admiralty for camouflaging ships so that that they would appear invisible to their enemies at sea. From the bridge or lookout of another ship the camouflage seemed effective. But the U-Boat commander, scanning the sea for a victim, was not deceived. Through his periscope a ship stood out clearly, silhouetted against the sky. In any case the hydrophone nullified any attempt by the surface vessel to remain unseen and undetected. It was an artist, Norman Wilkinson, who turned the idea on its head by proposing that ships should be made conspicuous to the point of confusion. Wilkinson suggested that ships could be painted in such a way as to produce an optical illusion and mislead an ememy submarine as to the course, speed and size of its quarry and as to the correct position to take up for the attack. The new system of ship camouflage became known as dazzle-painting.
In the bottom of the two photographs above of Kil Class Gunboats, the lower, HMS Kildangan, both ends of the a single-funneled gunboat are made to look alike and a dummy bridge was constructed aft, making a plot of its course most difficult for an attacking U-Boat. Dazzle-painting added to the confusion.
LF

#8 centurion

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Posted 25 January 2012 - 11:12 AM

Phil,
The 2 Kil Class Gunboats pictured in my post No.4 are apparently painted in what is known as " Dazzle-painting ".
From the beginning of WW1 schemes had been submitted to the Admiralty for camouflaging ships so that that they would appear invisible to their enemies at sea. From the bridge or lookout of another ship the camouflage seemed effective. But the U-Boat commander, scanning the sea for a victim, was not deceived. Through his periscope a ship stood out clearly, silhouetted against the sky. In any case the hydrophone nullified any attempt by the surface vessel to remain unseen and undetected. It was an artist, Norman Wilkinson, who turned the idea on its head by proposing that ships should be made conspicuous to the point of confusion. Wilkinson suggested that ships could be painted in such a way as to produce an optical illusion and mislead an ememy submarine as to the course, speed and size of its quarry and as to the correct position to take up for the attack. The new system of ship camouflage became known as dazzle-painting.
In the bottom of the two photographs above of Kil Class Gunboats, the lower, HMS Kildangan, both ends of the a single-funneled gunboat are made to look alike and a dummy bridge was constructed aft, making a plot of its course most difficult for an attacking U-Boat. Dazzle-painting added to the confusion.
LF


Dazzle painting was also applied to the hulls of some flying boats


Attached File  f2.jpg   84.59KB   1 downloads




#9 MikeMeech

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Posted 26 January 2012 - 09:58 AM

Hi Centurion

Strictly speaking the 'dazzle-painting' on the Felixstowe F.2A boats (based at Great Yarmouth and Felixstowe) was not for the same purpose as on naval ships. The flying -boats used the paint schemes to identify particular a/c. Brad King in his book 'Royal Naval Air Service 1912-1918' has this same photo on page 114 (N4545 from Felixstowe had a red and white striped hull), he states that:

"The dazzle paint scheme originated as a means of passing the time, but was adopted in various forms by other Great Yarmouth and Felixstowe 'boats. The schemes aided identification in the air during combat and on the water in the event of a forced landing."

Although one F.2A 'N4283' from Felixstowe (IWM photo Q 82243) had a black and white scheme that appeared more like the ship style dazzle-scheme than the other a/c.

Mike

#10 Phil Wood

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Posted 26 January 2012 - 01:09 PM

Thanks for all the responses.

I had found the pictures of the Kildangan and Kilour in their dazzle paint - showed one in a talk the other night raising a laugh from the audience - so its nice to learn the theory behind its use. Presumably these gunboats were primarily used in an anti-submarine roll?

There is a record of a Stoker First Class, a James H. Allen K29689, who died while serving on the Kildorrey on Friday, December 6, 1918 of the influenza.


This is the chap - he is commemorated on a war memorial at Midgham and roll of honour in Thatcham (both West Berks) and is buried in Thatcham cemetery http://westberkshire....php?gpic=94292. It was his service record that pointed me towards the Kildorrey. He also served in a couple of destroyers (Ouse and Mosquito). The cause of death according to this record was pneumonia (presumably a result of the flu).

Phil

#11 DannyManta

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Posted 26 January 2012 - 06:39 PM

great pics must take you ages to find them

#12 Lancashire Fusilier

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Posted 26 January 2012 - 07:55 PM

great pics must take you ages to find them


I am pleased you liked all the photos posted by members.
For my part, I have a good book resource which includes Purnell's History of World War One, published in the 1970's in 8 volumes, with a total of 128 sections, with several sub-sections in each section, so literally close to 1000 articles to refer to. These covering pretty much every aspect of World War One, and a mass of photographs also on every subject and topic.
And yes, the added fun is the research which can take several hours sometimes, so you have to enjoy doing it, which I do. Also, there is the internet!
LF.