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Great War Stained Glass Memorials to fallen.


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#226 David Underdown

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Posted 08 April 2012 - 06:04 PM

Daniel

My grandfather knew a lot about stained glass, but unfortunately I don't. I'm not sure if individuals signed their work, but the studio responsible will often be known if nothing else

This http://www.exetermem...threegables.php suggests there was a stained glass firm in Exeter run by the Drake family

There are details of some other firms here http://www.nationala....x=0&submit.y=0 I haven't checked if there are any Exeter based ones among them

#227 KateJ

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Posted 08 April 2012 - 07:36 PM

Not strictly in a church, but the following stained glasses are amazing and have to be seen to be believed. My little mobile phone camera does not do them justice. Originally in the Baltic Exchange in the City of London, after the IRA bomb of 1992, the stained glasses were painstakingly pieced back together again. They are now in the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich. http://www.rmg.co.uk...baltic-exchange

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#228 KateJ

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Posted 08 April 2012 - 07:42 PM

Baltic Exchange/National Maritime Museum

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#229 Lancashire Fusilier

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Posted 08 April 2012 - 07:58 PM

Baltic Exchange/National Maritime Museum


Kate,
Many years ago, I used to pass the Baltic Exchange on a regular basis, and had no idea they had such wonderful stained glass windows.
Many thanks for posting them.
Regards,
LF

#230 Lancashire Fusilier

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Posted 08 April 2012 - 08:07 PM

This window is dedicated in loving memory of Sydney Percival GAMON
Captain, 5th Battalion Cheshire Regiment, Pilot of the Royal Flying Corps.


Many thanks for posting those three excellent windows.
I found 2 reports on Captain Sydney Percival Gamon :-

The following appeared in Flight Magazine on April 11th 1918.....

Captain S. P. GAMON, Cheshire Regiment and R.F.C., who was killed accidentally while, flying on March 23rd, was the
eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Gamon, of Leighton Banastre, Parkgate, Cheshire, and was 23 years old. He was educated
at St. Fillan's Heswall, The Leas, Hoylake, and Uppingham School.
An application for entrance into the R.N.A.S. which he made in August, 1914, was refused, as he then held a commission in a Territorial Force as officer commanding the machine-gun section. This section was chiefly manned by men from the Chester Hydraulic Engineering Company, with whom he was completing a course of engineering, and he went to the front with his regiment in February, 1915, remaining with them there till May, 1916, and having during that time gained the permanent rank of captain. He then obtained leave to join the R.F.C., and was acting as observer in France from May to November, 1916, when he returned to England to take his pilot's course. Obtaining his wings early in 1917, he had since been engaged in the aerial defence of London.

Another report :-

" Capt S P Gamon of No 78 Sqn RFC, based at Sutton's Farm aerodrome, was killed in an accident while flying Sopwith Camel C6726 on 23 March 1918. He was practicing aerobatics near Hornchurch when the aeroplane entered a spinning nose dive and crashed. "

Regards,
LF

#231 Lancashire Fusilier

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Posted 08 April 2012 - 08:11 PM

I don't think his stained glass memorial window has been added to the tread.
The window is to the memory of all those who served in the Leinster regiment. Window is located in St. Brendan's Church in Birr and as far as I am aware it is the only War memorial in a Catholic church in Ireland.
Stephen


Stephen,
Many thanks for posting that wonderful window, and that is a very interesting statistic.
Regards,
LF

#232 KateJ

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Posted 08 April 2012 - 08:12 PM

Kate,
Many years ago, I used to pass the Baltic Exchange on a regular basis, and had no idea they had such wonderful stained glass windows.
Many thanks for posting them.
Regards,
LF


LF - they really are truly awe-inspiring and well worth a visit to the National Maritime Museum just to see them. I had no idea they were there and they literally stopped me in my tracks when I 'happened across' the exhibition.

Kate

#233 Lancashire Fusilier

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Posted 08 April 2012 - 08:13 PM

I'm heading up to God's own county for a few days, and have an appointment to photograph the two windows to the fallen at St John the Evangelist church in Greengates. I'll probably not be posting the images until I am back home the following week.

Keith


Look forward to seeing them
Regards,
LF

#234 Lancashire Fusilier

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Posted 09 April 2012 - 01:07 PM

This wonderful and unusual stained glass memorial window in memory of Lt. William Brett St. Leger M.C. of the 2nd Btn. Coldstream Guards, killed in action in France on 27th April, 1918, aged 23 years, was kindly sent to me by Ralph of the South African War Graves Project.
The window is in St. Mark's Cathedral Church, George, South Africa.
What is very unusual is that the window incorporates a painted photograph of Lt. St. Leger, and also, St. George is depicted wearing a WW1 steel helmet, and a WW1 uniform under his St.George's Cross smock.
Lt. William Brett St. Leger M.C., son of Major R.A. St. Leger ( S.A.M.C. ) of George, Cape Provice, South Africa, was a student at Cape Town, and left school to serve in the G.S.W.A. campaign with the Cape Town Highlanders. Afterwards, he went to England and trained with the Inns of Court O.T.C. for a commission and then joined the Coldstream Guards.
LF

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#235 Lancashire Fusilier

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Posted 09 April 2012 - 01:23 PM

I'm not sure if individuals signed their work.


David,
Due to the size of the photographs of many of the windows posted, it is not easy to see any of the Artist's signtures or monograms. However, by coincidence, the window I have just posted for Lt. St. Leger clearly shows the Artist's signature or monogram incorporated into the design in the bottom left hand corner of the painting, along with the date of the painting, 1923.
Regards,
LF

#236 David Underdown

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Posted 09 April 2012 - 02:39 PM

Having trouble making it out on my phone, is it definitely related to an individual, or could it be more of a company logo?

#237 Lancashire Fusilier

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Posted 10 April 2012 - 07:54 PM

Originally in the Baltic Exchange in the City of London, after the IRA bomb of 1992, the stained glasses were painstakingly pieced back together again. They are now in the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich.


Kate,
Following on from your superb post on the Baltic Exchange WW1 memorial stained glass windows, I was able to find some additional information on the windows, and some past and present photographs.
Coincidently, the bombing of the Baltic Exchange was exactly 20 years ago today, April 10th, 1992 !
Kind regards,
LF

" Baltic Exchange Memorial Glass
Shortly after the First World War, the artist John Dudley Forsyth (1874–1926) was commissioned to design a series of stained glass windows for the Baltic Exchange. These windows formed part of a memorial to the 60 members of the Exchange who lost their lives during the war.

Forsyth's stained glass was unveiled in 1922. It consisted of a half-dome and five large windows below, which were installed over a staircase to the lower floor. The subject is heroic and likens the British Empire to the Roman Empire.

The dome and windows were made up of many pieces of carefully selected coloured glass, which were painted and stained by skilled glass painters to represent the human figures, architectural and floral detail of Forsyth's original design. After firing, the glass pieces were assembled into windows and held together by a network of lead strips.

Forsyth was trained by the prolific stained-glass artist, Henry Holiday (1839–1927), one of the leaders in the Victorian revival of this medieval craft. Forsyth's work is much admired for its skilful composition and bold use of colour, which is clearly seen in the glass from the Baltic Exchange.

During the evening of 10 April 1992, a bomb exploded outside the Baltic Exchange. The explosion killed three people and caused severe damage to the building, including Forsyth's stained glass windows.

Of the 240 panels in the dome, only 45 remained completely intact and the windows below were extensively damaged.

As much glass as possible was painstakingly salvaged from the wreckage. It was passed to conservators in the hope that it could be repaired as part of the restoration plan for this important building. Unfortunately, the damage to the Exchange Hall was too extensive and the building was dismantled in 1998. Today, Foster and Partners' distinctive tower, developed by Swiss Re and affectionately known as 'the gherkin', occupies the site.

Over the past 10 years, glass conservators Goddard & Gibbs have worked to restore the stained glass to its former glory. Identifiable pieces of glass were meticulously sorted into the different windows, using photographs taken before and after the explosion.

Missing pieces were skilfully remade and fitted into accurate reproductions of the original leading, using these photographs and other examples of Forsyth's work as reference.

The restoration and display of the Baltic Exchange glass has been generously supported by Swiss Re.

The impressive half-dome, over three metres in height, is a fusion of classical and religious symbolism, which celebrates the heroism and triumph of war.

In the dome is the winged figure of Victory who steps from a boat through the central archway of a Roman temple. Roman centurions and female figures welcome Victory, and the dove of peace can be seen flying above her head.

Displayed within the architecture are the shields and badges of the colonies and dependencies of the British Empire, with the Royal Coat of Arms at the centre. The names of the major battles of the First World War are listed on the two outer panels. "

The photographs show the Dome in 1903 before the stained glass was installed - the Dome 1n 1922 after the stained glass windows were completed - work being done on the original stained glass paintings.

#238 Lancashire Fusilier

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Posted 10 April 2012 - 07:58 PM

The baltic Exchange Dome just before the bombing in 1991.

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#239 Lancashire Fusilier

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Posted 10 April 2012 - 08:08 PM

The Baltic Exchange Dome after the bombing in 1992, and restoration work in progress.

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#240 Lancashire Fusilier

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Posted 10 April 2012 - 08:59 PM

More photographs of the beautifully restored Baltic Exchange WW1 Menorial Windows.

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#241 Lancashire Fusilier

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Posted 10 April 2012 - 09:30 PM

Baltic Exchange WW1 Memorial Window - Victory panel.

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#242 KateJ

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Posted 10 April 2012 - 10:12 PM

LF - thanks for more pics and background info,

I have spent my entire working life in the City of London and used to walk past the Baltic Exchange every day. I remember 20 years ago today well - and also the IRA bomb a year later in 1993. I am also fortunate enough to have watched the Baltic Exchange's replacement, The Gherkin, being painstakingly built and watched as each individual pane of glass was skillfully guided into place - quite a feet of engineering! (I was working on the top floor of Tower 42- the old NatWest tower - at the time)

I am so pleased that the memorial windows have been repaired and re-sited at the National Maritime Museum - they really do have to be seen to be believed!

#243 Lancashire Fusilier

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 05:11 AM

May I ask a somewhat tangential question? Did stained glass artisans sign their work in any way?
-Daniel


Daniel,
The answer is yes, it appears that almost every stained glass window is signed in some way by the artist, and that seems logical given the enormous amount of work that went into painting, in many cases, a very large window.
The artist would clearly have taken great pride in their work, and would have wished to sign it.
Having researched many of the stained glass artists, I have found that many signed their names, others used their monograms, and others used symbols as their signature, as with Ninian Comper who used a strawberry plant, Charles Eamer Kempe who painted a small wheatsheaf, or Herbert Bryans who incorporated a scroll decoration into his paintings, which depicted a running dog, as his signature mark.
The signing of stained glass windows by the artists is a subject matter of its own, and when looking at the stained glass window it will be interesting to find the artists signature, monogram or mark somewhere within the painting.
I am posting a selection of just a few examples, as there were far too many to include them all.
Regards,
LF

#244 Lancashire Fusilier

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 05:17 AM

As his signature, Herbert Bryans incorporated a scroll design into his stained glass paintings which depicts a running dog.

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#245 Lancashire Fusilier

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 05:19 AM

Monogram of Alfred Ernest Child.

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#246 Lancashire Fusilier

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 05:23 AM

Ninian Comper's stained glass painting signature, was a Strawberry plant.

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#247 Lancashire Fusilier

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 05:26 AM

William Wailes used his monogram to sign his stained glass window paintings.

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#248 Lancashire Fusilier

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 05:28 AM

Edna Partridge's stained glass paintings signature.

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#249 Lancashire Fusilier

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 05:31 AM

Charles Eamer Kempe, used the painting of a small wheatsheaf as his stained glass painting signature.

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#250 Lancashire Fusilier

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 05:34 AM

Edward Frampton signed his stained glass window paintings with both his monogram and name.

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