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WW1 Top Gun


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#51 geraint

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Posted 28 March 2012 - 10:09 AM

I thought it an excellent and highly enjoyable programme. Well done to both Peter and Trevor. Those replicas were absolutely staggering, and I would have liked hearing the pilots relating on their actual flying experiences in the planes, and comparisons made by them.

#52 TonyE

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Posted 28 March 2012 - 11:00 AM

It was good, that was the opinion from my wife. Who rarely watches stuff like this so it must have been good. I really enjoyed it as well.


Agreed. The fair Vivienne also said that it was really interesting for someone who knew little about the subject.

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#53 alex revell

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Posted 28 March 2012 - 11:28 AM

Well, I liked it. Just to see those fantastic replica aeroplanes. Think back to the 60s when all we had were tarted up Tiger Moths as SE5s and one Pfalz replica. OK, there were one or two errors and the title was misleading, but all in all I thought it reasonable, especially compared with some recent efforts. Also good to see Peter and Trevor, a couple who know what they are talking about, instead of some uni academic - which is often the case - who wouldn't know a SE5 from a Spitfire.

#54 Lt Colonel Pleb

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Posted 28 March 2012 - 12:02 PM

They interviewed me, ignored everything I said, didn't pay me at all and never let me see the finished script despite promises. I won't be watching and if you've any sense you won't bother either!

The worst form of exploitative crap....

Pete


I seed it last night...and good it was too:those aircraft reconstructions, incredible; and it got the message over, IMO,of the importance of aerial reconnaissance to the overall war effort.

Plus, your own multiple appearances added acertain gravitas, and might well result in a series of your own (for which they'llpay you this time).





#55 Steven Broomfield

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Posted 28 March 2012 - 12:23 PM

I rather enjoyed it. I would love to know more about the cobstruction of the replicas 9and why New Zealand?), but for what it was, I thought it rather fun.

I certainly didn't think I'd been sold a Pup.

#56 TRAJAN

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Posted 28 March 2012 - 01:17 PM

... I certainly didn't think I'd been sold a Pup...


Grrrrrrroooooooaaaaaannnnnn... But a nice one!:thumbsup:

EDIT: PS, how long did you Scout around before you came up with that Doveish remark?

#57 David Filsell

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Posted 28 March 2012 - 02:42 PM

I still like Bristols!

#58 Moonraker

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Posted 28 March 2012 - 02:49 PM

I thought it very good, the input of the "talking heads" was excellent and the archive footage very interesting, though I could have done without seeing yet again the footage of soldiers going over the top, with one sliding back into the trench.(We've discussed this clip before and whether the scene was simulated.)Now I'm off to find out exactly how the interrupter thingy worked to stop bullets hitting the propeller blades and to find out what happened to Fokker after the war. (There should be plenty of info elsewhere on the Internet.)


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#59 George Armstrong Custer

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Posted 28 March 2012 - 03:10 PM

I still like Bristols!


It is indeed hard to beat a pair of gravity defying Bristols, mon ami.

#60 brucehubbard

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Posted 28 March 2012 - 03:18 PM

I still like Bristols!


Are we still talking about aeroplanes here?

:devilgrin:

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#61 Steven Broomfield

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Posted 28 March 2012 - 04:52 PM

Silly Fokkers.

#62 Jack Sheldon

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Posted 28 March 2012 - 05:18 PM

Unless I missed a mention of the word, I gave it a number of points for being able to discuss the issues without use of the word 'Ace'. This must be a televisual first - though I did think PMH's contributions were ace and I am not talking about bleach either ...

Jack

#63 Simon Birch

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Posted 28 March 2012 - 06:45 PM

I really enjoyed this programme, not over glossy and well produced but more importantly, if it adds one iota the publics understanding of the airman's huge contribution, and sacrifice, to the war effort it was worth making and showing.

Simon


#64 SteveMarsdin

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Posted 28 March 2012 - 08:02 PM

Whilst I can understand Pete's annoyance and trepidation, expressed in his earlier posts, given that he wasn't allowed to see the finished article; I do feel he needn't have worried.

When he gets chance to see it I'd be genuinely interested to hear what Pete thinks of the film.

PS. I was speaking to an old man who is a military aviation enthusiast today and he was full of ptaise for the programme too.

#65 Adrian Roberts

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 12:12 AM

I would love to know more about the cobstruction of the replicas 9and why New Zealand?),


New Zealand is the in place to be for Vintage Aviation, because the replicas are funded by Peter Jackson who lives there and who has stonking amounts of money, which come from directing films such as the Lord of the Rings trilogy.

#66 Grantowi

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 12:41 AM

When you're in a programme originally meant to be based on your books and in which you take part, which has already twisted and turned miles away from the original concept; when in addition - contrary to promises - you are not allowed to see the final script; and when finally to your horror you see it advertised on TV as 'Top Gun A***' then you too might become very worried and a perhaps little too defensive in advance of the first showing. I didn't watch it but I understand it was OK - a bit dumbed down - but with nice film of airyplonks and a star turn by our very own Trevor Henshaw! So I will certainly try to watch it on the Channel Five download-thingy.


Sorry I missed credits where it said it was based on your books, you should complain about that

P.S. I entirely understand your desperate need to indulge in cheap point-scoring during one of my rare moments of vulnerability and I apologise unreservedly for having given you a bum steer!


If I recall you were the one calling it "exploitative crap" and telling us all not to watch it !
And this was before you had even seen it, You had made up your mind and if people had followed your advice they would have missed a nice little documentry with some great aircraft in it.
I don't recall Trevor making any such comments.

I have no need to try to indulge in cheap point scoring, that again is all in your little head, but if it makes you feel better about yourself then you can take it as you want and thanks for the apology, maybe you should extend it to all of those who took your original advice

Grant

#67 Grantowi

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 12:45 AM

New Zealand is the in place to be for Vintage Aviation, because the replicas are funded by Peter Jackson who lives there and who has stonking amounts of money,


Do they ever take them overseas ?
They would make one hell of an attraction

Grant

#68 PMHart

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 06:03 AM

Grant thanks me old mucker! You hate-filled venom has a wonderful life-enhancing quality! Today, I awoke with a mild hangover after the London GWF shennanigins in the Pineapple and your posting was so amusingly 'other world' that it entirely cheered me up and I feel fine now. I think you may have healing powers! Thanks old chum - you will always be my bestest pal!

Pete

xxx

#69 George Armstrong Custer

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 08:51 AM

Tolerant Pete, we call him. Some might have dismissed Grantowi's posts as the outpourings of a Vice Admiral of the Narrow Seas, rather than showing some understanding of how difficult life must be for him with all that bile bottled up inside.

Vinegar Carrier George

#70 Trevor Henshaw

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 11:17 AM

I think Pete played an absolute blinder throughout the whole thing. His involvement and content was a banker for the whole endeavour, but his natural modesty possibly made him momentarily doubt this!

And as to those early misgivings they certainly got the program some attention!

It's good to talk. Well done Pete.

Trevor

#71 IanA

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 11:32 AM

I thought it was an excellent programme with sterling contributions from Pete and Trevor.

One little query - the programme correctly emphasised the importance of aerial photography and charted its development but, unless I dozed off at some point, there was no mention of that stalwart trooper 'Arry Tate. Surely, that can't be right?

#72 PMHart

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 11:51 AM

HI Ian,

If it's not mentioned then it is because they were mainly concerned with the development of new aircraft desings and techniques while the RE8 very much just took over from the BE2C in 1917. As such it carried out the same basic role, but I too agree that alongside the BE2 C it was one of the most deadly killing machines of the Great War.

Pete

#73 Steven Broomfield

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 12:19 PM

alongside the BE2 C it was one of the most deadly killing machines of the Great War.

Pete

Deadlier than Haig?

:whistle:

#74 Rockdoc

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 12:49 PM

I rather think he was meaning the killing of enemy soldiers, Broomers! Do keep up!!

Keith

#75 George Armstrong Custer

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Posted 29 March 2012 - 01:10 PM

Deadlier than Haig?

:whistle:


Don't be ridiculous - no fliers were ubiquitously known by the men as 'Butcher'.