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SOUTH STAFFORDSHIRE 2ND REGIMENT


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#1 andrew.gillsfc

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Posted 30 April 2012 - 09:49 AM

Hi

I require assistance in locating a relative who served in the South Staffordshire 2nd Battalion, called Private John Arnold Mitchell (regiment No. 32421).

Son of John and Mary Jane Mitchell, of Howarth, husband of Martha Myra Mitchell, of 30, Mytholmes Lane, Haworth, Keighley, Yorks.

The advice I would like to find out is where this battalion were on 12 March 1917 when he died.

Thanks





#2 Colin W Taylor

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Posted 30 April 2012 - 10:10 AM

Andrew

According to the 2nd S Staffs war diary the battalion were in the area of Wolfe Huts on the 12th.

'11 Moved to WOLFE HUTS on the Brigade going into the line. Working party to GREVILLERS LINE.
12 Working party to QUARRY on AQUEDUCT ROAD for purpose of laying track.
13 Warning of short notice to move arrived 8.30 am before the return of the above working party ....'

Presumably your man was struck by a shell and killed; possibly his body as not recoverable as a result and he was commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial to the missing, otherwise he may have been buried but his body was lost in later fighting.

I'm unsure exactly where WOLFE HUTS or the Quarry were. Hopefully someone will know.

Kind regards

Colin

#3 Roger H

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Posted 30 April 2012 - 10:43 AM

The quarry on Aqueduct Road is here (Trench Map from TNA CD from N and M Press)

Roger

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#4 andrew.gillsfc

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Posted 30 April 2012 - 11:32 AM

Thank you very much for your assistance. Strange to think that the amount of time I have been near that location, not knowing what happened there.

What were the Wolfe Huts?

#5 Roger H

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Posted 30 April 2012 - 02:21 PM

Wolfe Huts don't get a mention on my trench map CD. Perhaps a camp? Anyway, here is Grevillers Line:

Roger

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#6 andrew.gillsfc

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Posted 30 April 2012 - 10:45 PM

Thanks


So I assume that the South Staffs were located at this trench in March 1917.

#7 andrew.gillsfc

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Posted 02 May 2012 - 10:18 AM

Having done further research, apparently the Wolfe Huts are to the west of Poizieres on the Albert-Bapaume road. Does this appear on the trench map in this location?

#8 Roger H

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Posted 02 May 2012 - 12:09 PM

Sorry, can't see anything.

Roger

#9 Shawrybob

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Posted 19 November 2012 - 08:17 PM

Can anyone please help I am trying to find more information on a great uncle.
Pte. Ernest Clarence PHILLIPS, No. 9176 2nd Bn S.Staffs.

died 10 Mar 1915, no grave. Memorial in Le Touret Cemetery, Panels 21 and 22.

This might indicate it could have been the Battle of Gevenchy?

A story told many years ago and might be distorted now is that he was either killed on the wire or was blown up.

Bob

#10 Graeme Clarke

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Posted 20 November 2012 - 06:53 AM

Hi

He was killed during the Battle of Neuve Chapelle when his battalion were given the task of taking the German trenches north east of Givenchy. The attack commenced at 8.45am on the day of his death and almost immediately the battalion suffered heavy losses for little or no gain. The enemy had sited two machine guns to cross fire the 80 yards the battalion had to cover to reach their trenches. The German wire remained intact so a second bombardment was ordered in an attempt to provide a passage through.
Following this, at 2.45pm, the battalion again charged the German lines but, again, the enemy wire remained intact. The battalion was cut down by the accurate machine gun fire and suffered the loss of 4 officers and 24 other ranks killed, 2 officers and 74 other ranks wounded and 1 officer and 33 other ranks missing. The attack ground to a halt with no gain being made in the enemy trenches.
The War Diary (in part) records,
“10 March 1915 - At 8.10am “B” Company advanced against the enemy’s trenches in front of Duck’s Bill just east of Givenchy. As soon as the men left the shelter of our parapet they were subjected to a very severe cross fire from machine guns (2) in the German trench which at this point was 80 yards distant from our own. A certain number of men reached the German trench but were unable to remain there…
Eventually the attack ceased and the right column was ordered to reform. About 1pm orders were received that a fresh bombardment would take place at 2.15pm followed by a fresh assault at 2.45pm. “C” Company was told to lead the assault supported by “A” Company. “B” Company, which had suffered very heavily in the morning, being withdrawn.
The bombardment commenced at 2.15pm and at 2.45pm the leading sections advanced only to be mown down by machine gun fire, as soon as they had surmounted our parapet. The German wire not having been cut and their trenches having apparently suffered very slightly from the preliminary bombardment, it was decided not to press the assault further.
About 4pm orders were received to repair the trenches and to collect all wounded and their equipment.”

Regards,

Graeme