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L/Cpl Harrison Ledgard - 1/6th West Yorkshire Regt


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#1 Mike Frankish

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Posted 18 February 2013 - 09:23 PM

Service number: 1307
Died 5th Feb 1917 aged 22yrs
Native of Manningham, Bradford.

Would any regimental experts be able to provide any further information regarding this soldier's military service and the movement of the Bn in the run up to his date of death? All I have currently is the information provided by the CWGC.

Many thanks

Mike

#2 old owl

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Posted 18 February 2013 - 10:32 PM

Hi Mike,

In the 1/6th History there is a very interesting account of exactly how L/Cpl Ledgard met his death on 4-5/2/17, pages 141/142:

"The 1/6th Battalion patrols were very active during this period and there were several exciting encounters, not so much between patrols in No Man's Land as between our own patrols and fixed enemy posts. The Germans were on the defensive, and the initiative in No Man's Land belonged to us. Our best patrol leader throughout this period was L/Cpl (afterwards Cpl) Silverwood, DCM, MM. At 3-15 a.m. one winter's morning, in charge of a patrol of two other NCO's and three men, he proceeded down the slope of the L'Alouette-Ransart Road till within eighty yards of the enemy wire, where he estabished a listening post. The object of the patrol was the exact location of a strong enemy sentry post which our Brigadier wished the Battalion to raid. Silverwood and another scout, Ledgard, moved forward slowly to within twenty yards of the wire immediately in front of the enemy post. Unfortunately the enemy sentry was on the qui vive, and challenged suddenly, opening fire almost immediately with a machine gun onto our two scouts. L/Cpl Ledgard was severely wounded. Silverwood went back to the remainder of his patrol, ordered them to return to our lines, as their job was finished, and promptly returned himself towards the enemy. He found Ledgard still living. With great coolness Silverwood took of his comrades's equipment, and although only a few yards from the enemy wire, tried to bandage the wounds, and then dragged and carried Ledgard back to our lines. Enemy machine guns on right and left opened fire across No Man's Land during the whole episode, and wounded two of the four men whom Silverwood had ordered back to our line; Ledgard also was hit again two or three times, and died the following day. Silverwood was recommended for a bar to his DCM, but for some reason or other only received an MM, for a deed which all those who knew the conditions realised was quite indifferent to almost certain death, and which was performed under circumstances least likely to rouse excitement. The next night a party went out to try and find Ledgard's equipment, but the enemy had already taken it away, as the equipment had been left practically on their own parapet."

Well, that is a superb account of how he met his death. In many similar instances, I believe that Silverwood could have received a VC for such an act.

Hope you found this as interesting as I did? What is your interest?

Regards, Robert

#3 Chris Noble

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 11:52 AM

A fascinating account Robert.
Alan Silverwood was to unfortunately die of wounds on the 11/11/17. His award of the DCM in 1916 was for a similar act and I too am of the opinion that the he deserved the VC.
Best wishes.
Chris.

#4 Mike Frankish

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 08:52 PM

Many thanks Robert. I never thought I'd get such a comprehensive account of how he met his death. I offered to ask for information on behalf of a friend who is due to visit France this summer with members of L/Cpl Ledgard's family. This information will be forwarded to them.

Would anyone know from the service number his date of enlistment and additionally his date of entry into F&F?

Many thanks again for the responses, much appreciated.

#5 old owl

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 10:15 PM

Many thanks Robert. I never thought I'd get such a comprehensive account of how he met his death. I offered to ask for information on behalf of a friend who is due to visit France this summer with members of L/Cpl Ledgard's family. This information will be forwarded to them.

Would anyone know from the service number his date of enlistment and additionally his date of entry into F&F?

Many thanks again for the responses, much appreciated.


Hi Mike,

He entered France on 16th April, 1915, according to his Medal Index Card, and is entitled to a 1914/15 Star, British War and Victory Medals.

Looking at his number I would say that he was a pre-war territorial, although I cannot be certain about this, and unfortunately his service records to not appear to have survived. It is possible that an obituary may appear in the Bradford newspapers--which of course may spell out such detail.

Unfortunately Bradford Library is closed for several months whilst undergoing major repairs and refitting.

Robert

#6 Alisonledgard

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Posted 30 October 2013 - 05:49 PM

Hello 

 

My maiden name was Alison Ledgard and I am a direct descendant of Harry Ledgard ( My Grandfather - who died in WW2 ) and who was the brother of Harrison Ledgard. I am currently trying to trace my family as we had always believed that Harry was an only child and I have recently discovered that he had 2 Brothers - Harrison and Samuel and a Sister Alice. I would be pleased to know of the family that were visiting Harrison's grave in France as they are definately relatives of myself and my father Donald who would have been Harrison's Nephew . 

All replies appreciated 

Thanks



#7 sotonmate

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Posted 30 October 2013 - 06:04 PM

Alison

Have you any idea if Samuel served too ? I ask because there are two Medal Index Cards on Ancestry UK,thus:
Samuel Ledgard Sergeant 22727 West Yorkshire Regiment served after 31.12.1915,probably in India as he had only one campaign medal,and,
Sam Ledgard Private 11643 West Riding Regiment and later Private 39014 Machine Gun Corps.This soldier first landed at Gallipoli on 7.7.1915.

Later: so there are TWO Samuel's on the 1911 census, one is Harrison's dad's brother,aged 34. Could these two be the above ? Age-wise the younger was 18 in 1918 and may not have managed Sergeant by then but the older one could fit going to war in 1914.

#8 sotonmate

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Posted 30 October 2013 - 10:27 PM

Alison

 

The younger Samuel was from Kilson Hill,Mirfield,Huddersfield,born 1890,so probably of no direct family interest to you.

The older one has a service record on Ancestry UK. He lived at 149 Chassum Street,Manningham,Bradford,with a wife and two children,one,the boy John T,died in 1918 aged 3.

THis soldier served in the Malta Garrison with 1 Garrison Battalion West Yorkshire Regiment from 1.8.1915 to 12.1.1919,hence his entitlement to only the British War Medal as Malta was not a theatre of War.

He attested as a Private on 2.9.1914 and sped up thropugh the ranks to Sergeant by 1.8.1915. He returned home in Jan 1919 to be demobbed and to Class Z Reserve on 25.2.1919.



#9 Alisonledgard

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 04:41 PM

Thanks for the info - On the 1911 Census - Samuel Senior - the uncle of my grandad was 34 yrs old ( he was single and his occupation was chauffeur ) - Samuel junior his brother was 11and at school - so it looks like these fit ? - We are trying very hard to find family as we have information that there was also a Kathryn but we cannot identify where she fits in - it would be so good to find relatives we never knew about and it would appear that we have immediate family if relatives were going to see Harrison's grave as he was definatley my Grandpas Uncle 

 

regards 

 

Alison