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Princess Mary Tin

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#1 maldon

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Posted 11 April 2013 - 06:21 PM

Dear all,

A friend has just purchased a bullet pencil for his Princess Mary Tin. It was a lot of money but he doesn't think it is right. The crown at the top of the bullet is very small and on the bottom it has the word "proof". Also the top isn't silver. Any thoughts please?

Many thanks.
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#2 Sandie

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Posted 11 April 2013 - 07:31 PM

Here's a photo in close up. I don't think they were all the same. This one was sold at auction for £50.00.

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#3 mark holden

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Posted 11 April 2013 - 09:23 PM

Maldon,

It sounds fine to me. The monograms do vary in depth, a shallow striking on the case can make them look small. The bullet can be silver or nickel.I have had a pencil with 'proof' on it which I sold and now wish I had not! post a picture if you can but from what you have described it sounds ok.

Mark

#4 Grovetown

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Posted 12 April 2013 - 01:27 PM

I agree with Mark - seems absolutely fine, and to confirm that the pencil tops came in both nickel and silver.

Cheers,

GT.

#5 NigelS

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Posted 12 April 2013 - 04:45 PM

...and to confirm that the pencil tops came in both nickel and silver.


Nickel plate on brass? the one I have has been polished over the years so that, although the M of the monogram is still clear, the crown can only just be made out; the 'bullet' cap, which may or may not be original, now only shows signs of nickel (? - were any silver plated rather than the sterling silver version shown in Sandie's example above? ) plating where it fits into the cartridge case collar and in a dink which the polisher couldn't get into!

Out of interest, do the 'bullet' cap versions marked as 'sterling silver' also carry Hallmarks?

NigelS

#6 maldon

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Posted 12 April 2013 - 05:27 PM

Thanks everyone - really helpful as usual.
Best wishes.
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#7 Grovetown

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Posted 13 April 2013 - 10:38 AM

Nickel plate on brass? the one I have has been polished over the years so that, although the M of the monogram is still clear, the crown can only just be made out; the 'bullet' cap, which may or may not be original, now only shows signs of nickel (? - were any silver plated rather than the sterling silver version shown in Sandie's example above? ) plating where it fits into the cartridge case collar and in a dink which the polisher couldn't get into!

Out of interest, do the 'bullet' cap versions marked as 'sterling silver' also carry Hallmarks?

NigelS


Not sure whether its plated or solid - but certainly nickel. I have several silver ones, and they carry no more marks than the 'sterling'. The pencils were a replacement item for the lighter, which was discontinued when the Austrian-sourced ceric flints ran out.

If it can be obtained, the definitive article on tins, their manufacture and contents is by Bill Fulton and was published in the WFA Bulletin, No. 80, Feb/ March 2008.

Cheers,

GT.

#8 maldon

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Posted 14 April 2013 - 02:03 PM

Not sure whether its plated or solid - but certainly nickel. I have several silver ones, and they carry no more marks than the 'sterling'. The pencils were a replacement item for the lighter, which was discontinued when the Austrian-sourced ceric flints ran out.

If it can be obtained, the definitive article on tins, their manufacture and contents is by Bill Fulton and was published in the WFA Bulletin, No. 80, Feb/ March 2008.

Cheers,

GT.


Many thanks GT - Bill is an old mate of mine!
Regards.
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#9 TonyE

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Posted 14 April 2013 - 02:48 PM

They used all sorts of reject .303 inch cases to make the pencils. The fact that your one has "PROOF" in the headstamp means it was originally a proof round for testing rifles and machine guns,

Depending on exactly what the headstamp is, it is probably worth nearly as much to a cartridge collector than as a pencil!

Regards
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#10 maldon

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Posted 14 April 2013 - 05:29 PM

They used all sorts of reject .303 inch cases to make the pencils. The fact that your one has "PROOF" in the headstamp means it was originally a proof round for testing rifles and machine guns,

Depending on exactly what the headstamp is, it is probably worth nearly as much to a cartridge collector than as a pencil!

Regards
TonyE


Great stuff Tony.
Many thanks.
SPN.
Maldon