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Haig`s Cadetship - A Reassessment


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#1 Phil_B

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Posted 22 January 2005 - 11:03 AM

I have obtained a copy of this article by S.A.Anglim in the British Army Review. Pertinent parts are:-

In the archives of the RMA Sandhurst are kept complete registers of Gentlemen Cadets of the Royal Military College from 1806, before it came to Sandhurst, to its closure in 1939. These registers are open to historians and researchers in the same way as other public records.
From the register we find that Gentleman Cadet Douglas Haig entered the RMC in Feb 1884 and passed out on 21 December. A cadet`s place in the order of merit was based on a series of examinations in Military Administration, Military Law, Tactics, Fortification, Military Topography & Reconnaissance. Haig scored 2557 marks out of a possible 3350. These were the highest marks of his intake, making him first out of 129. Moreover, he was promoted Under Officer, senior cadet in his division and responsible for maintaining discipline among other cadets.

It would appear that Haig did win the Anson sword and fairly. "The Anson Memorial Sword is given to the cadet who passes first out of college at Xmas... At Midsummer a sword is given to the cadet passing out first .. and is known as the General Proficiency Sword." As all cadets at Sandhurst and Woolwich were given the title of gentleman cadet, regardless of background, the sword could be won by anyone.

Haig`s place in the order of merit cannot be refuted by his joining the 7th Hussars. Choice of regiment was made, in most cases, before arrival at Sandhurst and if those passing out top happened to go to the most senior regiments, then it was a lucky coincidence.

On marks alone, Haig`s year could be described as good but not outstanding.

Phil B

#2 GRUMPY

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Posted 22 January 2005 - 11:38 AM

QUOTE (m13pgb @ Sat, 22 Jan 2005 11:03:03 +0000)
As all cadets at Sandhurst and Woolwich were given the title of gentleman cadet, regardless of background, the sword could be won by anyone.

That is a very useful piece of information. I can have access to the publication when I visit Cambridge Uni. Library, which volume etc is it, please?

Gentlemen Cadets had become a complicated bunch by 1912.

They included: King's Cadets, Honorary King's Cadets, King's Indian Cadets, Honorary King's Indian Cadets, Pages of Honour, Army Council Nominated Cadets, and plain ordinary Gentlemen Cadets.

#3 Phil_B

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Posted 22 January 2005 - 11:45 AM

August 1992. Phil B

#4 GRUMPY

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Posted 22 January 2005 - 12:01 PM

Thanks .............. that will be deep down the pile!