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What WW1 books are you reading?


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#1176 misterkipper

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Posted 23 February 2012 - 08:22 PM

Hello Fran; Thanks for your reply; as I said, I've tried just about everywhere here..(including ABE books) with no luck at all; I was certain with all the big university Libraries here, (California) I'd find a copy.
I'll keep looking. Do you, or anyone else know anything about this book with the same title by a Betty Miller? That one is available. I sure appreciate all the postings people have put up about their favorite WW1 books...lots of new titles for me. I truly enjoy this website...(Just joined a couple months ago)

#1177 OpsMajor

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Posted 24 February 2012 - 09:14 AM

Thanks Hazel - I already have that one but thanks anyway
Mike

#1178 kenf48

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Posted 26 February 2012 - 12:00 AM

The lost Battalion



Online pamphlet by an American GWP



http://www.gwpda.org...t/LostBatTC.htm


Ken

#1179 jdoyle

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Posted 26 February 2012 - 08:57 AM

just started Forward the Rifles by David Campbell.

#1180 hazel clark

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Posted 26 February 2012 - 04:51 PM

I thought the" Lost Battalion" was at Gallipoli. i had an idea it was the queen's staff from Sandringham! Am I wrong is thinking there was another lost battalion?
Hazel C

Online pamphlet by an American GWP



http://www.gwpda.org...t/LostBatTC.htm


Ken



#1181 louvain

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Posted 26 February 2012 - 05:05 PM

"Liverpool Pals" by Graham Maddocks - picked up this afternoon in a lovely bookshop at Buxton.

#1182 SWorrall

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Posted 27 February 2012 - 02:22 PM

I thought the" Lost Battalion" was at Gallipoli. i had an idea it was the queen's staff from Sandringham! Am I wrong is thinking there was another lost battalion?
Hazel C


Hazel,
to an American the 'Lost battalion' would refer to the 1st battalion, 308th infantry Rgt, 77th (Statue of Liberty) infantry division, US Army.
Attacking Ridge 198 in the Meuse-Argonne offensive of 1918 they were cut off by an enemy counter-attack.
They lasted 5 days, from Oct 2 - 7th, behind German lines before finally being relieved.

Simon.

#1183 kenf48

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Posted 27 February 2012 - 08:55 PM

The book 'The Lost Battalion' Johnson and Pratt was first published in 1938.
This edition on Amazon is a 2000 reprint
http://www.amazon.co...n/dp/0803276133

Made into a film of the same name in 2001 http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0287535/

A more recent account and generally better reviewed is by Robert Laplander
http://www.amazon.co...79&sr=1-3-fkmr0
The cover picture shows the marker to 'Lost Battalion Ravine' which is on the Verdun Battlefield.
With no author given difficult to know which book was being referred to!

An interesting account of the 'Sandringham Pals' is on this Gallipoli website http://user.online.b...elders/sand.htm


Ken

#1184 hazel clark

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Posted 27 February 2012 - 09:15 PM

Thanks for that, Ken and Simon. The movie that I watched here in Canada was obviously about the 'Sandringham Pals" as it was about the Batt. largely raised from the Royal estate. I had not heard of the American "Lost Battalion".
Hazel C.

The book 'The Lost Battalion' Johnson and Pratt was first published in 1938.
This edition on Amazon is a 2000 reprint
http://www.amazon.co...n/dp/0803276133

Made into a film of the same name in 2001 http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0287535/

A more recent account and generally better reviewed is by Robert Laplander
http://www.amazon.co...79&sr=1-3-fkmr0
The cover picture shows the marker to 'Lost Battalion Ravine' which is on the Verdun Battlefield.
With no author given difficult to know which book was being referred to!

An interesting account of the 'Sandringham Pals' is on this Gallipoli website http://user.online.b...elders/sand.htm


Ken



#1185 Leigh Mc

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Posted 28 February 2012 - 12:51 AM

Battle Scarred: The 47th Battalion in the First World War. By Craig Dayton.

Digger Smith: And Australia's Great War. By Peter Stanley.

Bad Characters: Sex, Crime, Mutiny, Murder and The Australian Imperial Force. By Peter Stanley.

Fighting Nineteenth: History of the 19th Battalion AIF 1915 - 1918. By Wayne Mathews and David Wilson.

#1186 clarke

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Posted 28 February 2012 - 12:58 AM

Soldier Boy, By Anthony Hill. I needed something light to read & this has worked well.

#1187 MartinBennitt

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Posted 08 March 2012 - 09:09 AM

I'm now reading 'Eden to Armageddon: World War I in the Middle East' by Roger Ford. It should really have been called something like 'World War I on the Turkish Front' as it includes Gallipoli, which is not in the Middle East, but it still seems pretty good so far.

cheers Martin B

#1188 truthergw

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Posted 08 March 2012 - 10:35 AM

I have just taken delivery of a book which caught my eye online. " Military Adaptation in War - with fear of change". Williamson Murray. Not exclusively WW1, it does have a chapter headed , ' Complex adaptation, The Western Front 1914-1918.' I am looking forward to seeing what a modern American author has to say on this subject. Dr Murray is an academic with close ties to the defence. Although I have been disappointed in American authors before, I look forward to fresh approaches to what was one of the big problems in the Great War.

#1189 hazel clark

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Posted 10 March 2012 - 09:06 PM

Have just started "King Kaiser Tsar" which is a history of the main European Monarchies in the prelude to the first war. It looks as though the author Catrine Clay is making the case that the backgrounds and interpersonal relationships among the european dynasties, and the cousins in particular, had a huge effect on the shaping of the war itself, and ultimately on the whole of the western world

The author was given access by the Queen to various letters and diaries so seems to be fairly factual. It is well written, amusing in places. and a great "lighter" read if you need a break from the straight histories of the war itself. I myself am reading it between "Myriad Faces of War" and Stevenson's history.

Hazel Clark

What are you reading (WWI related) and would you recommend it?



#1190 b3rn

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Posted 11 March 2012 - 09:01 AM

Just finished David Stevenson, With Our Backs To The Wall: Victory and Defeat in 1918 (Allen Lane, 2011). Incredible detail. But I preferred 1918: A Very British Victory by Peter Hart (even if he glosses over the fact the Aussies won the war).

#1191 Glyno

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Posted 11 March 2012 - 11:08 AM

Pete Bartons Unseen Panoramas, The Somme. Excellent book :)

#1192 hazel clark

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Posted 11 March 2012 - 04:26 PM

I agree with you - I was glad when I had got to the end of the Stevenson book although I am shortly going to read his war history which is highly recommended.
H.C.

Just finished David Stevenson, With Our Backs To The Wall: Victory and Defeat in 1918 (Allen Lane, 2011). Incredible detail. But I preferred 1918: A Very British Victory by Peter Hart (even if he glosses over the fact the Aussies won the war).



#1193 b3rn

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Posted 11 March 2012 - 10:16 PM

I agree with you - I was glad when I had got to the end of the Stevenson book although I am shortly going to read his war history which is highly recommended.
H.C.


Just knocked over Robin Prior and Trevor Wilson's The Somme. Again, I preferred Peter Hart's book (The Darkest Hour). The personal accounts make it incredibly immediate - and not at the expense of the bigger picture.

#1194 PMHart

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Posted 12 March 2012 - 07:35 AM

Just knocked over Robin Prior and Trevor Wilson's The Somme. Again, I preferred Peter Hart's book (The Darkest Hour). The personal accounts make it incredibly immediate - and not at the expense of the bigger picture.


I'm beginning to really like this b3rn chap or chappess! Clearly someone of great taste and no little discretion.....

Pete

#1195 SteveMarsdin

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Posted 12 March 2012 - 11:56 AM

I'm beginning to really like this b3rn chap or chappess! Clearly someone of great taste and no little discretion.....

Pete



Weren't some of your relatives sent to Australia a few years back, Pete :thumbsup: :thumbsup:

#1196 Marilyne

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Posted 13 March 2012 - 05:12 PM

Looking for a place to put this ... found the right topic.

I'm just finishing "Testament of Youth". Superbe ... And so realistically romantic ... don't ask me to explain this term, It's just what comes to my mind. Romance but not l'eau de rose.
What a strong woman!!


Pity: I have to return it to the library tomorrow and have not finished the last 2 chapters ... scrongneugneu!!!!!!!!!!!!!:angry2:

Marilyne

#1197 hazel clark

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Posted 13 March 2012 - 06:20 PM

Read it some time ago and I agree with you!
H.C.

Looking for a place to put this ... found the right topic.

I'm just finishing "Testament of Youth". Superbe ... And so realistically romantic ... don't ask me to explain this term, It's just what comes to my mind. Romance but not l'eau de rose.
What a strong woman!!


Pity: I have to return it to the library tomorrow and have not finished the last 2 chapters ... scrongneugneu!!!!!!!!!!!!!:angry2:

Marilyne



#1198 Jonathan_nw

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Posted 14 March 2012 - 11:11 PM

I've become very much absorbed by the quite excellent "The War the Infantry Knew' by Captain J.C Dunn. For the uninitiated It's the story of 2/Royal Welch Fusiliers service through the Great War.

#1199 hazel clark

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Posted 15 March 2012 - 05:42 AM

It is in my pile to read - was recommendded by people on the Forum.
h.C.

I've become very much absorbed by the quite excellent "The War the Infantry Knew' by Captain J.C Dunn. For the uninitiated It's the story of 2/Royal Welch Fusiliers service through the Great War.



#1200 charles222

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Posted 15 March 2012 - 06:25 AM

Hi ,I am reading. Massacre at Passchendale . The N Z story,by Glyn Harper. A real good book.explains how a lot of our casualtys were caused by our own artillery .hurredly put into positions where the guns when fired sank in the mud and shells fell short into our N Z troops..
regards Charles.