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Officers/Soldiers Pay Rates 1914-1918


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#1 Benedictine

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Posted 30 March 2008 - 07:54 PM

Hello

For a little project I'm running I'm going to need a fair degree of help from this forum. To start off with, does anybody have access to pay rates throughout the war?


Many thanks,

JC

#2 ollydot

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Posted 31 March 2008 - 07:50 AM

Can give you a few from my GGRandfathers records.


Rfm 1/4/16 - 1/7/16 1/- a day
Sgt 2/7/16-28/5/17 2/- a day
CSM 29/517 -23/7/17 3/8 a day
Sgt 26/7/17 - 28/9/17 2/- a day
Sgt @ new rate 29/9/17 -22/11/17 @3/4
A ration allowance was paid leave 14-20/12/16 17/6d
Field allowance 29/5/17 -25/7/17 6d a day
Note the increase in the Sgt pay rate.
He was also paid an unspecified gratuity of 4
And another gratuity of 20 in respect of his DCM

I have his original statment of accounts and if you are interested I'll try to scan them and send them to you.




#3 Tony Lund

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Posted 31 March 2008 - 10:02 AM

I think there was some variation between the different branches.

At a recruiting meeting held in May 1915, Lieutenant Gay gave examples of the rates of pay for the lower ranks in the Royal Field Artillery. He said the men, gunners and drivers, would receive 1s. 2d. a day, raising by rank as follows: acting bombardier 1s. 7d., bombardier 2s. 2d., corporal 2s. 6d., sergeant 3s. 2d., and sergeant major 4s. 2d. The allowances were paid as follows: Separation allowance for a wife was 12s. 6d. a week, and for a child an extra 5s., and 2s. 6d. for all other children up to the age of fourteen. During training married men billeted at their own homes would receive 4s. 0d., an unmarred man 3s. 2d., if he was billeted elsewhere he would receive his normal pay and the billeting people would receive 2s. 6d.

The Separation Allowance seems to change rapidly in the early stages, both as regards the amount and the qualifications. A one point men are required to contribute sixpence a day to qualify. Then there is efficiency pay, I saw one report of an old soldier receiving six shillings a day, but this was stopped for some reason.

I believe there was a pay rise for infantry soldiers in December 1917, when the basic pay of an infantry private was increased from 1/- to 1/6 per day.

I would love to see a detailed account of pay and allowances throughout the war. Good luck with it.

Tony.

#4 sandyford

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Posted 31 March 2008 - 11:36 AM


Not quite the overall information that you want, but this is from the bottom of one of the famous Kitchener recruiting posters for the new army.

It bears out the shilling a day information. Unfortunately the amount that was deducted for the allotment is not very clear in this scan.

Kate

Attached File  Kitcheners_Army_pay.jpg   27.21KB   12 downloads

#5 centurion

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Posted 31 March 2008 - 11:43 AM

When in 1924 Navy pay was reduced from war time rates by five and a half percent all the new rates for officers in all branches (inc RMarines) was published in detail in the Gazette and is available online - by doing some sums it ought to be possible to come up with 1918 rates.

#6 Benedictine

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Posted 31 March 2008 - 06:10 PM

Great - thanks for that. It's particularly infantry I am interested in. I need officers' rates now if anyone can help :-)

#7 JamesM

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Posted 01 April 2008 - 07:53 AM

Hi JC
Don't know if this helps, but a great-uncle of mine was a 2nd Lt with the 6/Somerset Light Infantry and was killed on 28 August 1916. He was also wounded on 19 Aug 1916, but stayed at his post. His papers at the Nat Archives give details of his Assets at death - and from these we may be able to deduce some details of pay, as follows:

Army pay due as part of the estate - 65/4/9 (net income of 74/2/10 less expenses - ie the total of the sums detailed below).

Effects credited to will [?relates to pay owing]:
F. All 20-28/8/16 9@2/6 1/2/6
L. F+L 1-28/8/16 28@2/4 3/5/4
Also note: ‘Paid 10July1915-31August1916 186days @ 7/6 per day 69/15/-‘

From this, I read that:
Standard rate of pay for a 2/LT was 7/6 per day.
There was some kind of addtional pay for being at the front - perhaps 2/4 per day.
There was an additional payment for being wounded - perhaps 2/6 per day.

Don't know what the intiials F and L mean? Food and Lodging, perhaps?

Can this be right??

Would be glad for any feedback on my interpretation, anyone?

Cheers
James

#8 Benedictine

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Posted 01 April 2008 - 08:20 PM

Thanks everyone - it's certainly a help. I'm surprised there isn't anyone with access to the pay rates from an Army Pub out there. James looks about right.


#9 boysoldier

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Posted 01 April 2008 - 09:01 PM

The tunnellers were well paid, that is against the ordinary OR, the "clay-kickers " received 6 shillings a day, their mates received 2 shillings & two pence.

Cheers.

Colin

#10 Bootnecks

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Posted 02 April 2008 - 03:36 AM

JC...

The rates of pay for officers and other ranks varied emensly according to the time served, rank and regiment.

If you could specify a particular regiment and officer rank, I will be more than happy to oblige by searching 'Royal Warrent: 1913.

Seph

#11 Benedictine

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Posted 02 April 2008 - 09:07 PM

QUOTE (Bootnecks @ Apr 2 2008, 04:36 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
JC...

The rates of pay for officers and other ranks varied emensly according to the time served, rank and regiment.

If you could specify a particular regiment and officer rank, I will be more than happy to oblige by searching 'Royal Warrent: 1913.

Seph


Lieutenant West Riding Regiment 1918

smile.gif

#12 Bootnecks

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Posted 02 April 2008 - 09:51 PM

QUOTE (Benedictine @ Apr 2 2008, 02:07 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Lieutenant West Riding Regiment 1918

smile.gif


From: Royal Warrent for the Pay, Appointment, Promotion, and None-Effective pay of the Army, 1913 (HMSO)
Page: 50 [Rates of Pay: Infantry Officers]
Article: 227 (continued)...
...Lieutenant = 6s.6d (per day)... after 7.yrs service = 7s.6d (per day)
2nd Lieutenant = 5s.3d (per day)

The above is the basic pay scale. A Lieutenant, if in the position of Battalion Adjutant, could nearly double his daily rate of pay.

Also, if in the position of Assistant Adjutant for Musketry either at the regimental depot, or within the parent battalion, the Lieutenant would only receive an additional 1s.8d per day.

The above rates of pay are only for 1913, as I do not pocess any other updated issues of this publication. The rates of pay may well have risen or altered in some way during the course of the war. There may be a chum within the forum who could expand upon what I have given above!

The Imperial monetary system at the time of WW.1.... indeed up until 1972, was a three tear system = Pounds, Shillings, Pennies ='d' not as today = 'p'

One Pound = '20' Shillings or '240' Pennies
One Shilling = '12' Pennies

Did that help?

Seph huh.gif

#13 laughton

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Posted 03 April 2008 - 02:34 AM

There is a copy of my grandfather's PAY BOOK with the rates of pay at this page on his web site:

http://www.censol.ca...eatwar/hero.htm

The pay book rate card is here:

http://www.censol.ca...ook/gvlpay3.jpg


#14 Benedictine

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Posted 03 April 2008 - 09:29 AM

QUOTE (laughton @ Apr 3 2008, 03:34 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
There is a copy of my grandfather's PAY BOOK with the rates of pay at this page on his web site:

http://www.censol.ca...eatwar/hero.htm

The pay book rate card is here:

http://www.censol.ca...ook/gvlpay3.jpg



Thanks for that - any idea what date that is? Dollars to modern s is hard enough. I wouldn't care to try 1917 Canadian $ to S d


#15 laughton

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Posted 05 April 2008 - 02:58 AM

To the best of my knowledge it is 1917 as this was in my grandfather's field book. It appears he kept his CEF book even when he was then serving in the Northumberland Fusiliers in the spring of 1917. That could mean the book was circa 1916.

There are a number of currency conversion sites on the web if you search Google.

#16 Terry_Reeves

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Posted 05 April 2008 - 10:51 PM

The 1914 pay Warrant authorised the following rates of pay for Officers of Infantry of the Line. The rates were extant in 1917:

Lt Col - 23/-

Major - 16/- (18/- after 24 years service)

Captain - 12s 6d

Lt - 8s 6d - (serving as a Lt on 24/11/1914, after 6 years service, if certified by his commanding officer as practically efficient in command of men - 9/-)

2Lt - 7s 6d

Commissioned from the ranks:

Captain - 14/-

Captain, after 3 years service in the rank provided he has at least 12 years service, of which 3 years may have been in the ranks - 14s 6d

Lt or 2 Lt - 10/-

Lt or 2 Lt after 6 years service, of which 3 years may have been in the ranks - 11/-

TR




#17 Benedictine

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Posted 06 April 2008 - 07:18 PM

Thanks Terry - I think will settle for 10 shillings a day. I'm surprised that men from the ranks got more - how forward thinking of them!

Jason

#18 Chris_Baker

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 09:46 AM

This is an old thread now, but for anyone wishing to see some details on the matter of pay I have just added this page to the LLT: http://www.1914-1918.net/pay_1914.html

#19 Ron Clifton

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 04:09 PM

F. All 20-28/8/16 9@2/6 £1/2/6
L. F+L 1-28/8/16 28@2/4 £3/5/4

From this, I read that:
Standard rate of pay for a 2/LT was 7/6 per day.
There was some kind of addtional pay for being at the front - perhaps 2/4 per day.
There was an additional payment for being wounded - perhaps 2/6 per day.

Hello James

F All = Field allowance, given to officers and WOs. I think the rate for subalterns was 2s 6d a day.
L F+L is probably Lodging, Fuel & Light.

Ron

#20 Ron Clifton

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 04:15 PM

I'm surprised there isn't anyone with access to the pay rates from an Army Pub out there.

Hello Benedictine

There is! Give me time. There was a publication containing all the changes to the Pay Warrant from the outbreak of war until Augut 1918 (I doubt that there were any significant ones after that date) but it runs to about 150 pages, and it doesn't cover allowances.

Ron

#21 Ron Clifton

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 10:05 AM

Hello all


The only general increase in officers' rates of pay seems to have been by a Royal Warrant of 25 Jan 1918, and these appear to have been backdated to 1 Oct 1917.


The minimum daily rates of pay for captains, lieutenants and second-lieutenants, whether commissioned from the ranks or not, were increased to 13s 6d, 11s 6d and 10s 6d respectively.

Captains commissioned from the ranks received 14s 0d a day.

A captain on the highr rate of pay (usually after six years' service) received 14s 6d a day.

A captain who was a brevet major received an extra 2s 9d a day (it was 2s 0d in 1914).

A major received 18s 0d a day.

There was no increase in pay for officers above that rank.


These rates applied specifically to infantry of the line: there were variations for other arms, but the minimum rates quuoted applied to captains and below in all arms.


Ron



#22 khaki

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 10:18 AM

Reading the posts it occured to me to ask, if the rate was say, a shilling a day, what is a day? is it 8 hours 10 hours,or 'stand to' to 'stand down' and was the soldier paid for every day he was in the army or was it a five day pay/work week?? Just how was it calculated compared to civilian workers

confused

khaki

#23 Ron Clifton

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 11:27 AM

Hello Khaki

You cannot view it in civilian terms. Soldiers were paid seven days a week, the day being 24 hours from midnight to midnight. There was no "overtime" as you might find in industry. However, soldiers employed on certain duties (mostly labouring, before the creation of the Labour Corps) they could be paid additional "working pay", basically in rates per two-hour stretch.

Ron

#24 bill24chev

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Posted 17 November 2012 - 08:28 AM

Hello Khaki

You cannot view it in civilian terms. Soldiers were paid seven days a week, the day being 24 hours from midnight to midnight. There was no "overtime" as you might find in industry.
Ron


And it remains the same today.

A WW1 (RSM) in that place to the north of the old North West Frontier gets less than the minimum wage on a 24/7 basis.

If lived in Tunbridge Wells I would write to the Times about it.
Bill

#25 Ron Clifton

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Posted 17 November 2012 - 09:32 AM

Bill

Probably not, if you re-calculate the National Minimum Wage on a 24/7 basis, which means dividing it by about five!

Ron