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Ian C

SS Kenmare

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Ian C

Ther is a lone British Sailor buried in Skerries, about 25 miles North of Dublin on the Irish East coast. I speculated on here a few years ago about whether it would be possible to try and put a name to him, the response, probably quite rightly, was not encouraging and so I went no further. I discovered today that someone from Skerries has had the same idea, he speculates that the body may have come from the SS Kenmare which was sunk by a U Boat on 02.03.18, the body in Skerries was washed up on 18.03.18, two other bodies were washed up in the area (although not in Skerries) and one of those was identified as a J. MaCauley from the Kenmare.

The Kenmare was an armed Merchantship and so far I have been unable to find a list of all 29 casualties, I did however, find a site that it says lists British Navel losses and for the Kenmare it has only two names (one of which is MaCauley). Does this indicate that the other names are unknown or that these two were the only 2 men in the Royal Navy as opposed to the Merchant Navy on board. The sailors headstone says Royal Navy, presumably they could tell this by his dress, would the Royal Navy on board an armed MS be dressed differently to the Merchant Navy crew?

Any ideas gratefully received.

Regards

IanC

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Terence Munson

Ian

While most sites indicate 29 casualties, I can only find 24 commemorated by the CWGC using

Geoff's search engine. 22 are Mercantile Marines the other two are A.E. Aston RNR and MacAulay, John RNVR

who is buried at BALROTHERY (ST. PETER) CHURCH OF IRELAND CHURCHYARD. CWGC Link

Can provide the 24 names if you require them.

Cheers, Terry

p.s. See this account Link

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Ian C

Thanks for that Terry, I still think this will be a lost cause but the list of names might be useful.

Regards

IanC

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Terence Munson

Ian,

List of 24 casualties as promised:

AHERN M CWGC Link

ASTON A.E. CWGC Link

BLACKLOCK P. CWGC Link

BOWEN S. CWGC Link

COLEMAN M. CWGC Link

CORCORAN P.J. CWGC Link

DELEA M. CWGC Link

FENNESAY P. CWGC Link

FITZGERALD J. CWGC Link

GOOD J.J. CWGC Link

GRANT G.J. CWGC Link

JOHNSTONE R. CWGC Link

KEENAN J. CWGC Link

KEMP O. CWGC Link

LYONS W. CWGC Link

MacAULAY J. CWGC Link

McCARTIE P. H. CWGC Link

McLAUGHLIN R. CWGC Link

MOORE W. CWGC Link

MURPHY T. CWGC Link

O’DRISCOLL M.J. CWGC Link

O’KEEFFE J. CWGC Link

OGLE T. H. CWGC Link

SHAW A.C. CWGC Link

Cheers, Terry

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Wrecktec

Hi Terry

I have a database based on the Cross of Sacrifice books and those are the only names I can find for the Kenmare too

Cheers Ron

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Terence Munson

Ron,

Thanks, I think the other five casualties must be seamen from non-commonwealth countries if twenty-nine is correct.

Cheers, Terry

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Ian C

Cheers Terry

Regards

IanC

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gaelgoir

I speculate that your two naval casualties were wearing identification tags when their bodies were found. If you Google Kenmare torpedoed you will find several items which might assist your researches. One of the items gives details in a survivor's account

Kenmare,”1985; 565 tons; built at Newcastle by Messrs. Wigham Richardson & Co., for the city of Cork Steam Packet company, Ltd., Length 264.5 feet, breath 35.6 feet, depth 16.9 feet.She was Torpedoed in the Irish Channel on Saturday, 2nd March 1918, between Holyhead and Rockabill Light, on a voyage to Cork, under the command of Captain P. Blackrock, and a crew numbering 33 all told.

The torpedo struck her amidships without warning, the force of the explosion being terrific, and she at once commenced to got down by the stern. Captain Black rock gave orders to launch the boats, and succeeded, with portion of the crew, in getting into one of them, but within two minutes the “Kenmare” went down carrying with her the boat and its occupants, who subsequently came to the surface, struggling for life amidst the wreckage which floated about. Mr. Evans, the chief officer, and timothy O’Brien succeeded in getting into another, and as the “Kenmare” went down they floated off, and seeing the donkey man, James Barry (he was 22 years in the ship) they pulled him on board, and a little later on came upon another capsized Lifeboat, from which they rescued the steward, James Wright. He was found with his head sticking out from the upturned boat, they had great difficulty in extracting him from his perilous position, as he could not assist himself owing to one of his arms being fractured. They also subsequently rescued the gunner, J. Brougham, and the carpenter, A. Philips, who were floating amongst the floating wreckage. At this time the cries of the drowning men t were piteous, but owing to the darkness, it was impossible to locate them, and after the cries had gradually died away, they had reluctantly to abandon the search.

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David G James

Hello Ianc etal.

That man fromSkerries who is trying to identify the 1918 burial of the Royal Navy sailor c’estmoi. To date I have not achieved ID but have established from contemporarynewspaper reports that 3 bodies were found on Sat 16th March 1918 washed up on3 different beaches Balbriggan, Skerries and Gormanston. All these beaches arein the same vicinity and indeed are within sight of one another. Only 1 body was identified as that of LDHJohn Macaulay RNR, one of 3 gunners (2 lostand 1 survived) on board the SS Kenmare that was sunk 60kms north of east fromSkerries on Sat 2nd March and he was buried with full military honours on Tues19th March in the cemetery adjoining StPeter's Church Balrothery Co. Dublin. His grave is marked with a CWGC headstoneand is recorded in the CWGC database. The reports go on to give an account ofthe 2 other burials, also with full military honours, on Mon 18th March, one atSkerries and one at Gormanston. The grave at Skerries is also marked with aCWGC headstone and is also recorded in the CWGC database. However there is norecord in the CWGC database of the burial in Gormanston. The only burial groundfitting the description in the newspaper reports is located at Irishtown, whichis close to Gormanston. I have visited this burial ground, which is veryancient and on private land. There are no cemetery records or authority and whilethere are local hearsay accounts of the burial there of a WW1 sailor there isnothing there evident of that. I havebeen in email correspondence re this third burial with the OPW, CWGC and IFTCProject but to no avail to date as the level of evidence I have is of littlevalue.

Apart fromthe unidentified and lost burials there are a number of other mysteries here.Presuming all 3 bodies came from the same wreck, i.e. SS Kenmare, how did theyfetch up 60kms away to the west in 14 days? The newspaper reports describe thebodies as ‘in good condition and not long in the water’. To my knowledge adrowned body in sea water for 2 weeks could not be so described. Did thesethree perhaps survive the sinking (there were 5 survivors) and get into or ontosomething that floated, drifted westwards towards Ireland and finally succumbto exposure or dehydration? Unlikely but not impossible.

Having allbut given up on my original quest to identify the burial in Skerries, if Icould gather sufficient evidence to convince the CWGC re the lost burial thenmy efforts will not have come to naught.

ADB

David G.

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Lee Aston

Albert Edward Aston, was my Great Grandfathers brother

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David G James

Hello Lee, My research into the identity of the 'Known Unto God' 1918 burial of a Royal Navy sailor in Skerries indicates this burial to be that of your Great Grand Uncle Albert Edward Aston. Please check your email, keeping in mind that emails might deliver to your Spam or Junk folders.

Regards,

David G James,

Skerries

Known Unto God.jpg

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RaySearching
On 15/03/2011 at 20:08, Terence Munson said:

Ron,

Thanks, I think the other five casualties must be seamen from non-commonwealth countries if twenty-nine is correct.

Cheers, Terry

 

 

The Kenmare was carrying three passengers when she was sunk

 

W Hartnett

D V Sullivan

E Mchamara

Listed as cattlemen from Cork  (source Deaths at sea)

 

which takes the total casualty's  now  known to have perished on the Kenmare as 24 + 3 = 27

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David G James
On 30/10/2016 at 15:58, Lee Aston said:

Albert Edward Aston, was my Great Grandfathers brother

Hello again Lee. Having not heard further from you I ask have you received my emails?  

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Ian davies

I have recently moved to Shelley, west Yorkshire. A nearby graveyard in Kirkburton contains a grave marker for Allen Charlesworth Shaw, 3Rd engineer on SS kenmare, what are the chances of his body being in this grave, does anybody have any info about repatriated remains

 

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Old Cove

Ian,

According to the CWGC database Allen Shaw is recorded on the Tower Hill Memorial which commemorates men and women of the Merchant Navy and Fisheries Fleet who have no known grave so it seems unlikely that he is buried there.  It is not unusual for someone who was killed in the Great War and buried overseas - or had no known grave - to be commemorated on a family headstone at home.  There are several examples in my local churchyard.

Regards

Roger

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David G James
On 19/02/2017 at 12:37, Ian davies said:

I have recently moved to Shelley, west Yorkshire. A nearby graveyard in Kirkburton contains a grave marker for Allen Charlesworth Shaw, 3Rd engineer on SS kenmare, what are the chances of his body being in this grave, does anybody have any info about repatriated remains

 

Hello Ian D. To my knowledge there is only one identified burial from the 2nd March 1918 sinking of the SS Kenmare and it is that of LDH John Macaulay, one of three RN gunners on board.  Please read more here; http://macaulay-kenmare.blogspot.ie/  A. C. Shaw is listed amongst the casualties and again to my knowledge his body was never recovered.

One of the RN gunners survived while I have good but circumstantial evidence to indicae the third gunner AB Albert Edward Aston is buried unidentified here in Skerries as Known Unto God..  

SS Kenmare casualties.pdf

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