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Lancashire Fusilier

WW1 Military Motors - 1916 set x 50 cards

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centurion

Some 35 Minerva armoured cars were built in WW1. The Belgians used them in Russia. Some Beute Minervas were used in Romania by the Germans. The last Minerva's left service in the mid 1930s

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Lancashire Fusilier

This set contains several other versions of Armoured Cars, which you will find equally interesting.

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Lancashire Fusilier

Will's WW1 Military Motors - Card No.21 - British/Australian Motor Repairing Shop.

" Every detail is carefully thought out for these splendidly equipped workshops - skilled mechanics accompany each workshop for repairing any breakdown that might occur to their Motor Transports "

post-63666-0-08630300-1324481991.jpg

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Lancashire Fusilier

Will's WW1 Military Motors - Card No.22 - British/Canadian Motor Machine Gun Battery.

" A number of these batteries were brought to England with the Canadian contingent - the men and their Maxim batteries are well protected from rifle fire by the thick armour plates which cover the cars "

post-63666-0-21313400-1324482378.jpg

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Lancashire Fusilier

Will's WW1 Military Motors - Card No.23 - British/Indian Motor Ambulances.

" The Rulers and Princes of India presented to H.M. King George V., 41 Siddeley-Deasy Ambulances, 5 Motor cars for Officers, and 10 Motor Cycles - a timely and magnificent gift "

post-63666-0-30630900-1324482768.jpg

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centurion

Will's WW1 Military Motors - Card No.21 - British/Australian Motor Repairing Shop.

" Every detail is carefully thought out for these splendidly equipped workshops - skilled mechanics accompany each workshop for repairing any breakdown that might occur to their Motor Transports "

post-9885-0-61612200-1324483058.jpeg

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Lancashire Fusilier

Will's WW1 Military Motors - Card No.24 - British/Indian Motor Transports.

" This picture shows our brave Indian troops being taken in transports from their base to the firing line, somewhere in France "

post-63666-0-03649400-1324483140.jpg

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centurion

Will's WW1 Military Motors - Card No.22 - British/Canadian Motor Machine Gun Battery.

" A number of these batteries were brought to England with the Canadian contingent - the men and their Maxim batteries are well protected from rifle fire by the thick armour plates which cover the cars "

post-9885-0-73313000-1324483203.jpeg

post-9885-0-59070800-1324483163.jpeg

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Lancashire Fusilier

Will's WW1 Military Motors - Card No.25 - British/New Zealand Motor Ambulance.

" Numbers of these splendidly equipped Motor Ambulances accompanied our brave New Zealand forces to the Eastern theatre of the war - The chassis is a 20-h.p. extra strong Colonial Napier. The men were all thoroughly trained, and rendered splendid service during the Gallipoli operations, when our Colonial troops earned undying fame through their almost superhuman bravery "

post-63666-0-50706200-1324483570.jpg

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centurion

Will's WW1 Military Motors - Card No.23 - British/Indian Motor Ambulances.

" The Rulers and Princes of India presented to H.M. King George V., 41 Siddeley-Deasy Ambulances, 5 Motor cars for Officers, and 10 Motor Cycles - a timely and magnificent gift "

The ambulances

post-9885-0-09595400-1324483448.jpeg

Earlier Indian Ambulance volunteer - recognise him?

post-9885-0-07068100-1324483519.jpg

It's Gandhi

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Lancashire Fusilier

Centurion,

Many thanks for the great research and photographs, as when this post started, there was some scepticism regarding the existance of the vehicles shown on the cards, it now seems that not only did they exist, but they actually saw service.

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centurion

Will's WW1 Military Motors - Card No.25 - British/New Zealand Motor Ambulance.

" Numbers of these splendidly equipped Motor Ambulances accompanied our brave New Zealand forces to the Eastern theatre of the war - The chassis is a 20-h.p. extra strong Colonial Napier. The men were all thoroughly trained, and rendered splendid service during the Gallipoli operations, when our Colonial troops earned undying fame through their almost superhuman bravery "

Same type

post-9885-0-06206900-1324484621.jpeg

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GRANVILLE

Great results, but where's the armoured Tricycle?? :unsure:

DU

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centurion

Great results, but where's the armoured Tricycle?? :unsure:

DU

Take a look in War Cars by David Fletcher. There is a photo in that. There has been a thread on it on this forum but I can't find it as yet.

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centurion

The very odd looking armoured car with the grapnel appears based on the PRE WW1 Bianchi used in the Italio- Turkish War in Libya in 1912. The Libyans attempted to impede Italian progress along the roads with barbed wire and this was sometimes towed away but there is a great deal of artists licence in the fag card picture

post-9885-0-33624000-1324490301.jpg

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daggers

Great series. Thanks for all the posts.

D

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GRANVILLE

post-9885-0-61612200-1324483058.jpeg

I came up with this one for the Motor Workshop, and you can see in a little more detail some of the machinery on board.

DU

post-23614-0-63858000-1324492937.jpg

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GRANVILLE

And now for the Armoured Stretcher! Has anyone got a photo of one of these 'in the field'?

DU

post-23614-0-58191100-1324493166.jpg

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centurion

Will's WW1 Military Motors - Card No.24 - British/Indian Motor Transports.

" This picture shows our brave Indian troops being taken in transports from their base to the firing line, somewhere in France "

The closest match I can find is this

post-9885-0-82171800-1324493492.jpeg

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Lancashire Fusilier

That appears to be the exact Transport Lorry in Card No.24, all that is missing is the frame that presumably supports a canvas top.

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Lancashire Fusilier

Lorry mounted AA Gun in action, and note the Rangefinder in front of the lorry.

post-63666-0-30399200-1324496811.jpg

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Rockdoc

I think that's a 13pdr 9cwt gun - a sleeved-down 18pdr that kept the original breech for extra oomph as the muzzle velocity with the 6cwt was quite low. It's. at full recoil but the muzzle is more or less in line with the end of the recuperator. The barrel of the 6cwt gun was about the same length.

6cwt gun on a Mk II high-angle mount.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:13Pdr6cwtAAgunThornycroftLorry1916.jpg

9cwt at Duxford

IMG_2805.jpg

Keith

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centurion

And now for the Armoured Stretcher! Has anyone got a photo of one of these 'in the field'?

DU

No because they never existed. Some one has doctored the original photo of a proposed, but never adopted, device for getting a sniper closer to the enemy lines (later called a 'push tank' ) by putting red crosses on it and sold it to a magazine

post-9885-0-62183900-1324500095.jpeg

post-9885-0-22929400-1324500115.jpeg

You need to ask the questions - how would you get the man iside and what cover would anyone have pushing it - another load of Ed!

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Lancashire Fusilier

Thanks for the info Keith, and a great photograph of Lorry mounted gun.

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GRANVILLE

No because they never existed. Some one has doctored the original photo of a proposed, but never adopted, device for getting a sniper closer to the enemy lines (later called a 'push tank' ) by putting red crosses on it and sold it to a magazine

post-9885-0-62183900-1324500095.jpeg

post-9885-0-22929400-1324500115.jpeg

You need to ask the questions - how would you get the man iside and what cover would anyone have pushing it - another load of Ed!

I can't help but think you are being a bit presumptuous in the assertion that the armoured stretcher is something which never existed and is simply concocted on the back of the proposal for snipers. Both of the illustrations posted are clearly from the same publication, but clearly describe two distinctly different devices. The armoured stretcher illustration I have posted is also from a period publication which quite clearly attributes its invention to a Colonel Cantile RAMC, an asertion I would have thought will have been made with a degree of evidence from the time.

Looking at the concept, I can well imagine some people will have have considered all and any means by which they could get the wounded off the field of battle in greater safty than was afforded by being carried off on an open strecther. Consiquently, the idea of something that could be wheeled forward (empty) to the casualty, and then I imagine dragged or even hauled back on ropes, must surely have been something the authorities may well have considered and experimented with?

Common sense dictates that such a wheeled device will have had all manner of problems in its use, and for this reason I can well imagine it never saw active service, and yet does not mean it will never have been tried etc?

Dave Upton

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