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Chris_Baker

Hospitals in the United Kingdom

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OPPO

Greetings from Canada!

 

I'm new to the site, so please excuse me if the information I'm looking for has been posted elsewhere.  This post was prompted by the wealth of information I've seen here, specifically by Don in respect of Ireland.

 

I have a badly damaged photograph of my paternal Grandfather, Louis Philip Mann, when he was recovering in a Dubing hospital after being wounded.  He was a regular who served with the 1st Bn The Queen's RWS Regiment from the start of the war until he was wounded, sometime between November 1914 and January 1915.

 

There's also a postcard sent to him at the hospital he was recouperating in, situated at 88 Harcourt Stree, Dublin, Ireland, which I believe was the National Children's Hospital.  I've searched obvious sites on-line but have been unable to find any reference to that location as a military hospital, or casualty lists.  Does anyone have information about this location or indeed, the wehereabouts of casualty lists that I can check?

 

I should add that his record was destroyed during the WW2 bombing, so appart from his Medal Roll and pre-war records we've discovered, I've been trying to piece more of his WW1 service together.  I'm not sure if he survived Gheluvelt unscathed and was wounded later.  The War Diaries for the Battalion have little information.

 

Thanks in advance for any assistance or pointers.

 

Phil

Edited by OPPO
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Don
1 hour ago, Don said:

Hi Phil,

I will do a bit of digging re Harcourt Street Hospital.

I am also compiling the 1915 lists for Dublin Hospitals and I will check to see if he appears on any of the lists.

Back soon

Gerry  

Hi Phil,

 

I found Pte Louis Mann  5929  1st Queens West Surrey wounded in the Children's Hospital on the 7th November 1914.

He arrived on the Hospital Ship Oxfordshire a few days before.

His injuries were:Bullet Wound Right Hip and Shrapnel wound in the left Buttock.

I hope to have more info re Harcourt Street Hospital later.

 

Regards

Gerry  

 

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Scotsmac
On 02/03/2017 at 11:39, suesalter1 said:

One of my great-uncles was in the 4th Scottish Hospital in Glasgow (he wasn't Scottish, by the way). He was there 7 months with a shattered right shoulder blade and only discharged after the Armistice. Does any photos exist, I wonder?

 

Sue.

 

Have a look here  for some info. And in the Wikipedia article here. And you'll find photos here. As an aside I was born in Stobhill Hospital a long time ago.

Best Wishes

Keith

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suesalter1

Thanks for the info, Keith. Does the hospital still exist? Now looking for any WW1 records of patients at Stobhill.

 

Sue.

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seaJane
20 minutes ago, suesalter1 said:

Thanks for the info, Keith. Does the hospital still exist? Now looking for any WW1 records of patients at Stobhill.

 

Sue.

Sue

The place to look would be the Hospital Records Database, http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/hospitalrecords/, but don't get your hopes up too much.

seaJane

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Scotsmac
32 minutes ago, suesalter1 said:

Thanks for the info, Keith. Does the hospital still exist? Now looking for any WW1 records of patients at Stobhill.

 

Sue.

Most of the hospital exists, but I'm not sure from how far back, it would have been added to over the years with the most recent addition in 2007 I think.  Have a look on Google maps in satellite view to see what is there now.

With respect for records, as seaJane says above you might be lucky but you could try the Mitchell Library Archives in Glasgow which have some hospital records, and also the University of Glasgow which hold the NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde Archives

Good Luck

Keith

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OPPO
19 hours ago, Don said:

Hi Phil,

 

I found Pte Louis Mann  5929  1st Queens West Surrey wounded in the Children's Hospital on the 7th November 1914.

He arrived on the Hospital Ship Oxfordshire a few days before.

His injuries were:Bullet Wound Right Hip and Shrapnel wound in the left Buttock.

I hope to have more info re Harcourt Street Hospital later.

 

Regards

Gerry  

 

Hi Gerry,

 

Very many thanks for the fast response and excellent information.  That's my paternal Grandfather, (No., Rank, Name).  I had thought that he was wounded at Gheluvelt 31 Oct-01Nov, when the Battalion was reduced to 32, (as I recall), but looking at the timelines of his arrival in Dublin, perhaps a little earlier?

 

Do you know if there's a website with any photographs of wounded in the hospital, (the one I have is badly damaged, specifically where my Granddad was sitting). I know its a forlorn hope with the number of wounded flowing through, but you never know.

 

If you do happen to come across more information, or know somewhere I can look further, I would be extremely grateful.

 

Best wishes from Canada!

Phil

 

Edited by OPPO
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Don

 

 

 

Hi Phil,

I enclose a news paper cutting of your relative for your research. Please see below

I have searched for photos of wounded in Hospitals and there are none for Dublin Hospitals that I can retrieve.

Having no service record for him as you say is unfortunate. Perhaps if you search numbers close to his or wounded soldiers from his regiment who were hospitalised you might come across some new info re his service.

There were three chaps from his regiment hospitalised in the Curragh Military Hospital at the same time Pte W Cox 5875,Pte A Banks 6749,

Pte H Davis 8930

It's only a hunch but I have had some success with this type of research.

If I come across any more info I will contact you.

 Best regards

Gerry

    

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pte Mann.pdf

Edited by Don

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OPPO
5 hours ago, Don said:

 

 

 

Hi Phil,

I enclose a news paper cutting of your relative for your research. Please see below

I have searched for photos of wounded in Hospitals and there are none for Dublin Hospitals that I can retrieve.

Having no service record for him as you say is unfortunate. Perhaps if you search numbers close to his or wounded soldiers from his regiment who were hospitalised you might come across some new info re his service.

There were three chaps from his regiment hospitalised in the Curragh Military Hospital at the same time Pte W Cox 5875,Pte A Banks 6749,

Pte H Davis 8930

It's only a hunch but I have had some success with this type of research.

If I come across any more info I will contact you.

 Best regards

Gerry

    

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pte Mann.pdf

 

Hi Gerry,

 

Yet again, very many thanks!  I'm having a little trouble decyphering the top line of the newspaper article and if its on hand, can you advise the newspaper and date please.

 

Excellent idea re others from 1 Queen's admitted at the same time in Curragh M.H.  Oddly enough, Louis was born in The Curragh in 1878, and had originally joined The Leinster's at Aldershot, in 1891, lying about his age and discharged... He was later with 3 VB The Queen's, then a regular with the 2n Bn, Scots Guards in the Boer War. He finally went back to The Queen's, this time as a regular, serving with the 1st Battalion.

 

Its the records from his service with 1 Queen;s that were sadly destroyed, so trying to piece things together. Your assistance and suggestions have been great.

 

Thanks again

 

Phil

 

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Don

Hi Phil,

I will try and get a better copy for you.

You could email through private message

Gerry

Edited by Don

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ASA1

Hi Phil, the 1914 star medal roll confirms he disembarked on 19th September 1914 along with 78 others from the battalion. It is likely he was part of a reinforcement of 49 men who joined the battalion on 8th October. 

 

I have a particular interest in the battalion and have written about the attack at Gheluvelt here - https://ww1geek.com/2012/10/31/1st-queens-at-gheluvelt/

 

Regards,

Andy

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Don

Hope the Mods don't mind me posting these records,it's 4 years of work

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Andy Wade

They're terrific Don! Thanks for posting them!

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bargingalong

I'm just completing research into the staff who worked at No.3 Woodlands Hospital in Standish, near Wigan. It was housed in The Beeches, a large house built by local brewers, Almonds. As its title alludes, there were two other Woodlands Hospitals. They were sited about three miles away on the road from Standish to Wigan, opposite the Royal Albert Edward Infirmary. They were housed in The Woodlands, offered by Lord Crawford of Haigh Hall (used briefly as a convalescent home) - that was Woodlands No. 1. Woodlands No. 2 was in The Mariebonne, almost next door, and owned by Mrs ffarington, of Worden, Leyland. 

Thankfully, a Report was produced after the war giving a very full account of the activities of these hospitals, including extensive lists of all the staff, and the numbers of patients each received. Also listed are the three men who died in the hospitals: Woodlands No. 1: Pte. John France, 1958 5th Manchesters. Bayonet wound to chest. Admitted 9/11/15, died 17/1/16; Pte Henry Langelaan 2617, DCLI. Gunshot wound right forearm. Admitted 7/8/16, died 16/8/16 due to tetanus; Woodlands No. 3: Pte Richard Kelly, 13888, 3rd SWB. Frostbite. Admitted 8/1/15, died 17/1/15, tetanus.

There are plaques in local churches commemorating the laying-up of the flags of the hospitals in 1919 - Nos. 1 & 2 in All Saints, Wigan Parish Church, and No. 3 in St Wilfrid's Church, Standish.

Most of the VAD nurses seem to have been the sisters or wives or girlfriends of officers, and the most were with the local TA force, the 1st/5th Manchesters.

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GWF1967

Hi,

 Does anyone recognize the Eye and Ear Hospital in this photograph?

Scan_20160221 (2).png

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Patrick H

Does anyone have information on Keighley Military Hospital. My man John Groves Pte 28887 1st Essex died of wounds on the 10th August 1917

 

Patrick

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Moonraker

Have you explored the dozen or more websites suggested by Googling? No doubt some of  them rely on copy & paste, but there seems to be a lot of information (rather mote than I've seen for comparable hospitals elsewhere). And there are some interesting photographs, courtesy of Google Images.

 

And searching this forum will lead to quite recent posts about the hospital's patients'  war register being transcribed.

 

Moonraker

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seaJane
17 hours ago, GWF1967 said:

Hi,

 Does anyone recognize the Eye and Ear Hospital in this photograph?

 

 

Is it the Royal Victoria E & E H in Dublin?

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GWF1967
8 minutes ago, seaJane said:

 

Is it the Royal Victoria E & E H in Dublin?

Thanks for looking seaJane, 

 I can't find a picture of the outpatient department of the Dublin E&E to compare, but from the pictures of the front of the building I've seen I don't think it is. 

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GrahamC

There were 5 in Buxton, Derbyshire - mostly dealing with Canadian casualties especially after the Granville Canadian Special Hospital was moved from Ramsgate in 1915.

 

Read about them at http://www.buxtonwarmemorials.co.uk/hospitals.html

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Acknown

I've had a search, and I think I've got the Eye and Ear answer. The car in the photo has the registration 'BK' which from 1903 was issued for cars registered in Portsmouth (see this website: http://www.cvpg.co.uk/REG.pdf). Also, in those days there was a EE hospital in Pembroke Road, Portsmouth (see this website: http://www.ataleofonecity.portsmouth.gov.uk/place/portsmouth-and-southern-counties-eye-and-ear-hospital/). If you take a virtual walk down Pembroke Road on Google Maps, you will see the same gate pillars (stand-alone with ball on top) that appear on the photo in two places on the north side of the road: outside a building named Pembroke House on the junction with Pembroke Close, and further along the road just before the junction with Victoria Avenue outside a gate invitingly labelled PRIVATE RESIDENTS ONLY. If either place was the old Portsmouth EE hospital, that's the answer.

Acknown

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seaJane

Shaking my head at my own idiocy - I have been down that road rather a lot of times! 

 

It's probably worth contacting Portsmouth City Library and enquiring if their local history department has anything.

Edited by seaJane

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GWF1967
5 hours ago, Acknown said:

I've had a search, and I think I've got the Eye and Ear answer. The car in the photo has the registration 'BK' which from 1903 was issued for cars registered in Portsmouth (see this website: http://www.cvpg.co.uk/REG.pdf). Also, in those days there was a EE hospital in Pembroke Road, Portsmouth (see this website: http://www.ataleofonecity.portsmouth.gov.uk/place/portsmouth-and-southern-counties-eye-and-ear-hospital/). If you take a virtual walk down Pembroke Road on Google Maps, you will see the same gate pillars (stand-alone with ball on top) that appear on the photo in two places on the north side of the road: outside a building named Pembroke House on the junction with Pembroke Close, and further along the road just before the junction with Victoria Avenue outside a gate invitingly labelled PRIVATE RESIDENTS ONLY. If either place was the old Portsmouth EE hospital, that's the answer.

Acknown

Fantastic, many thanks  Acknown.

The arrangement and relative sizes of windows, arches etc. say's you are spot on. The gate posts, railings and lamp brackets put it way beyond doubt.

 The original 8" x 12" framed photo is very underexposed. When sat at my desk it stands right in my eye-line and has bugged me;  I was slowly google-ing my way through Victorian E&E H's in the major conurbations of the UK.

  Guy.

Edited by GWF1967

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charlie962

Very clever sleuthing by Acknown

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