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Remembered Today:

Lancashire Fusilier

WW1 Grenades both British and Enemy.

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auchonvillerssomme

I think that a lot are missed because some collectors don't know what to look for, which as you know, is the groove running down from the centre of the filling hole.

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Skipman

Great thread LF. Interesting website here Click

Mike

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Michael Haselgrove

Here is another example of the "centre cast" No. 5 Mark 1 with an example of the later casting to the right for comparison. As far as the "centre cast" grenade is concerned the striker is not vented, the lever is marked Rg. No. 646009 and the base plug is dated 8/15.

Regards,

Michael H.

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Grovetown

Not collecting ordnance, save a few representative examples; could someone please tell me what - if anything - we may discern from the lever design (my few having a mix of flat and 'grooved' levers)?

Cheers,

GT.

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Lancashire Fusilier

Not collecting ordnance, save a few representative examples; could someone please tell me what - if anything - we may discern from the lever design (my few having a mix of flat and 'grooved' levers)?

Cheers,

GT.

GT.,

The flat striker lever design, as opposed to the grooved striker lever, was first introduced in 1917 on the No.23 Mk.III Mills Bomb, and was purely a cost cutting design change, the flat lever being cheaper to produce.

Regards,

LF

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Lancashire Fusilier
Here is another example of the "centre cast" No. 5 Mark 1 with an example of the later casting to the right for comparison. As far as the "centre cast" grenade is concerned the striker is not vented, the lever is marked Rg. No. 646009 and the base plug is dated 8/15.Regards,Michael H.

Michael,

Two excellent examples, and a very good point regarding the ' vented striker '.

The original Mills Bomb strikers were made from a solid piece of metal, and it was found that this ' solid ' design ( photo attached ) prevented adequate air flow for the burning fuse, so as from production of the early No.5 Mills Bomb, a deep vent slot was cut into the base of the striker ( see my post # 36 ) to permit gases to escape, this design of striker being the ' vented ' striker.

Regards,

LF

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Lancashire Fusilier

Examples of ' flat ' striker levers, as opposed to ' grooved ' striker levers shown in my post # 36.

LF

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Lancashire Fusilier

I think that a lot are missed because some collectors don't know what to look for, which as you know, is the groove running down from the centre of the filling hole.

I really like the cutaway examples, and many thanks for pointing out the " groove running down from the centre of the filling hole ", a great way to spot the ' centre cast ' variation.

Regards,

LF

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Grovetown

Thanks for the clarification re: levers.

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pietro

Is the popular auction site the place to find WW1 versions? Or are there recommended dealers? I'd like to have one.

Peter

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Lancashire Fusilier

Is the popular auction site the place to find WW1 versions? Or are there recommended dealers? I'd like to have one.

Peter

Peter,

I am not sure if sites like Ebay sell inert ordnance, you make wish to check ?

I have sent you a PM with the name of a reputable dealer who currently has a nice WW1 example for sale.

Mills Bombs/Grenades are always very popular, and currently, nice complete examples which can be disassembled sell for between 180/250 pounds.

Regards,

LF

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AndrewBelsey

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Here's a slightly different example. My grandfather found this in the undergrowth after a day of practicing firing rifle grenades in Kent during 1917. It's all there except the explosive and the screw covering the chamber.

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Lancashire Fusilier

Here's a slightly different example. My grandfather found this in the undergrowth after a day of practicing firing rifle grenades in Kent during 1917. It's all there except the explosive and the screw covering the chamber.

How very fortunate you are to have such a great example complete with it's original rod, which was picked up by your grandfather in 1917, are there any markings on the base plug ?

Regards,

LF

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Lancashire Fusilier

Does anyone have a photograph of the WW1 Mills Bomb/Grenade transit/storage box ? I was hoping to see such an original box shown in use, or from someone's collection.

I have searched, and all I could find were reproduction boxes made by a Company which specializes in all sorts of reproduction military equipment etc., on their web site :-

www.tommyspackfillers.com

I assume, they have based their reproductions on original boxes, which show the storage and transit method for the Mills Bombs, the metal tool affixed to the lid is for securing the base plugs, also shown are their resin replica Mills Bombs.

They show 2 boxes, one for the No.5 and one for the No.36.

LF

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RobL

Also photos on the site of a reproduction No 34 Mk III crate which is the same just with more bombs, and therefore more 'pegs' on each side

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Lancashire Fusilier

Also photos on the site of a reproduction No 34 Mk III crate which is the same just with more bombs, and therefore more 'pegs' on each side

Everything looks well made, hope to see some originals also.

Regards,

LF

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YankeeDiv

nice collection!

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Lancashire Fusilier

nice collection!

Pleased you are enjoying the Thread.

Regards,

LF

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Lancashire Fusilier

In the photograph of the Bombing Party shown in post # 3, there appears to be Mills Bomb storage/carrying boxes on the ground in front of the left soldier, and also between the two soldiers.

LF

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Lancashire Fusilier

A well armed trench raiding party, with the two men at the back right carrying Mills Bombs, and the man at the front right has a Mills Bomb at his feet.

LF

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Lancashire Fusilier

A Trench Raiding Party back from a successful raid, God help anyone who ran into this bunch of lads!

LF

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auchonvillerssomme

Not seen mention of one of these yet.....

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Lancashire Fusilier

Not seen mention of one of these yet.....

Personally, I need help here, what is it ? some kind of hand tool ?

Regards,

LF

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auchonvillerssomme

Here we go. Mick

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Lancashire Fusilier

Here we go. Mick

And......... ??

Not seen one before, please explain.

Regards,

LF

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