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Fattyowls

Sorry NF I was too busy chuckling about the 4th arm gag. Not Gourard, this is closer to home. The man it was attached to was the highest ranking officer to comment on a series of semi-mythical events.

 

Pete.

 

 

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neverforget
12 minutes ago, Fattyowls said:

Sorry NF I was too busy chuckling about the 4th arm gag. Not Gourard, this is closer to home. The man it was attached to was the highest ranking officer to comment on a series of semi-mythical events.

 

Pete.

 

 

So, closer to home would rule out Alphonse Juin as well then? 

Had more than a hand in breaking the Gustav Line.....O.k I'll get my coat.

P.S. Loved your idea about the Great War Forum on tour. Belting idea!

Edited by neverforget

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Fattyowls
10 minutes ago, neverforget said:

So, closer to home would rule out Alphonse Juin as well then? 

Had more than a hand in breaking the Gustav Line.....O.k I'll get my coat.

P.S. Loved your idea about the Great War Forum on tour. Belting idea!

 

Not Juin. The owner lost something other than his arm sadly.

 

Pete.

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Knotty

Hi Pete

Would it be the left hand prosthetic of Lieutenant-General Sir Walter Congreve VC of The Rifle Brigade, who was the only corps commander wounded in WW1. He also lost his son Billy also a VC winner at the Somme. Despite his bravery and losing his hand at Vimy in 1917 he was dismissed in 1918 during the German Offensive and was shunned by his old roommate, namely Haig.

 

John

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Fattyowls

That would be absolutely correct John, with a bit of information that I didn't know too. Walter Congreve was also the highest ranking officer to mention football being played during the Christmas truce of 1914. He heard rumours of a game being played further up the line, and considered going out into no man's land himself but thought better of it.

 

Pete.

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Knotty

Nf

Assuming two things, firstly he is German, and secondly, that your officer is above the rank of Generalmajor, then I need to go through 52 Generalleutant,19 General Der Infanteier, 3 Generaloberst and a couple of Generalfeldmarschall, together with pictures if possible.

In the words of a well known actor......I’ll be back

PS what’s the GWF on tour about?

 

John

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neverforget
5 minutes ago, Knotty said:

Nf

Assuming two things, firstly he is German, and secondly, that your officer is above the rank of Generalmajor, then I need to go through 52 Generalleutant,19 General Der Infanteier, 3 Generaloberst and a couple of Generalfeldmarschall, together with pictures if possible.

In the words of a well known actor......I’ll be back

PS what’s the GWF on tour about?

 

John

Hi John. All your assumptions are correct. I'll spare you the 52 lesser mortals that you mention. 

My GWF on tour comment was in response to our good friend Pete's remark here:

Could this be the start of something magical?????

 

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Fattyowls
4 minutes ago, Knotty said:

PS what’s the GWF on tour about?

 

NF has just rendered this post superlflo, obsol, meaningle pointl out of date. I was being mostly tongue in cheek (as usual) but I think we all know each other well enough in cyberspace to risk meeting up and wandering the vasty fields of France, especially with someone like Jim as the guide.

 

Pete.

 

P.s

6 minutes ago, neverforget said:

Could this be the start of something magical????

 

I wouldn't got that far.

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Ron Clifton

Post 7475 - Generalfeldmarshall Karl von Bulow, commander of the German Second Army in 1914?

 

Ron

Edited by Ron Clifton

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neverforget
12 minutes ago, Ron Clifton said:

Post 7475 - Generalfeldmarshall Karl von Bulow, commander of the German Second Army in 1914?

 

Ron

Close Ron, but not close enough I'm afraid 

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neverforget
55 minutes ago, Fattyowls said:

 

NF has just rendered this post superlflo, obsol, meaningle pointl out of date. I was being mostly tongue in cheek (as usual) but I think we all know each other well enough in cyberspace to risk meeting up and wandering the vasty fields of France, especially with someone like Jim as the guide.

 

Pete.

 

P.s

 

I wouldn't got that far.

Actually mate, judging by your posts and photos and wonderful anecdotes, I reckon you'd make a mighty fine guide yourself. 

Just saying.......

1 hour ago, Ron Clifton said:

Post 7475 - Generalfeldmarshall Karl von Bulow, commander of the German Second Army in 1914?

 

Ron

My man was actually murdered/assassinated.

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Fattyowls
22 minutes ago, neverforget said:

Actually mate, judging by your posts and photos and wonderful anecdotes, I reckon you'd make a mighty fine guide yourself. 

Just saying.......

My man was actually murdered/assassinated.

 

NF, would we be talking about an assassination that took place in part of the Ottoman Empire?

 

As for tour guiding it's much much harder than it appears. I once took some mates to the battlefields and there was a lot of unintentional comedy, Mill Road up to Thiepval was a particular low point. It's about knowing your facts and just the bare minimum of information to paint the scene. I can look over say Mash valley from Oviliers Millitary cemetery and can't stop myself talking about the permafrost origins of dry valleys in chalk country and then telling the story of how one of the occupants of the cemetery inspired the Kop at St Andrews' favourite song.

 

And that is before describing the Tyneside Irish battalions coming over the hill into the teeth of the German machine guns firing from a mile away to die before even reaching their own front line on 1st July.

 

You need a proper guide like Jim, or Chris Baker who I know gets it absolutely right.

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neverforget
15 minutes ago, Fattyowls said:

 

NF, would we be talking about an assassination that took place in part of the Ottoman Empire?

 

 

Sorry for the delay, I had to check, but yes you're firmly on his trail.

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neverforget
20 minutes ago, Fattyowls said:

 

It's about knowing your facts and just the bare minimum of information to paint the scene. I can look over say Mash valley from Oviliers Millitary cemetery and can't stop myself talking about the permafrost origins of dry valleys in chalk country and then telling the story of how one of the occupants of the cemetery inspired the Kop at St Andrews' favourite song.

 

And that is before describing the Tyneside Irish battalions coming over the hill into the teeth of the German machine guns firing from a mile away to die before even reaching their own front line on 1st July.

 

 

See what I mean? Your words just took me on a guided tour. 

Brilliant mate. 👍

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Fattyowls

A good guide would just state the bare minimum and let the picture tell the story.

59fe1f40eefec_MashValleyfromnearOvilliers.thumb.JPG.c30fbbb0f1c82f040fe99b99bc649bc9.JPG

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neverforget
14 minutes ago, Fattyowls said:

A good guide would just state the bare minimum and let the picture tell the story.

59fe1f40eefec_MashValleyfromnearOvilliers.thumb.JPG.c30fbbb0f1c82f040fe99b99bc649bc9.JPG

Great picture Pete. I take it that this is Lauder jnr's eternal view then? 

The gentle lies of the land really bring one's imagination into play. Their gentleness belying the horrors that occurred within. 

A picture paints a thousand words, but can also hide as many truths.

 

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Knotty

NF & Pete

Goodness me what a run around needed to find a photo that matched the drawing, only to find I could have ignored the majority. (Still being careful with logging on, missed post#7842 and others.)

Anyway with Pete’s help (again) with ref to the Ottoman connection I conclude that it’s Generalfeldmarschall Hermann Emil Gottfried von Eichhorn who was assassinated in Kiev 30/7/1918.

https://en.m.wikisource.org/wiki/1922_Encyclopædia_Britannica/Eichhorn,_Hermann_von.

 

Talk about coincidences happening on the GWF, yesterday I was going through old photos I have taken, and in a folder on its own was a pic of Capt. John Lauder’s headstone, why it was on its own I can’t remember. (Apologies for size,I have my reasons!)

6AB3C972-A2C9-4781-BA26-F4E4EE3E8D68.jpeg

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neverforget
9 hours ago, Knotty said:

NF & Pete

Goodness me what a run around needed to find a photo that matched the drawing, only to find I could have ignored the majority. (Still being careful with logging on, missed post#7842 and others.)

Anyway with Pete’s help (again) with ref to the Ottoman connection I conclude that it’s Generalfeldmarschall Hermann Emil Gottfried von Eichhorn who was assassinated in Kiev 30/7/1918.

https://en.m.wikisource.org/wiki/1922_Encyclopædia_Britannica/Eichhorn,_Hermann_von.

 

Talk about coincidences happening on the GWF, yesterday I was going through old photos I have taken, and in a folder on its own was a pic of Capt. John Lauder’s headstone, why it was on its own I can’t remember. (Apologies for size,I have my reasons!)

6AB3C972-A2C9-4781-BA26-F4E4EE3E8D68.jpeg

Generalfeldmarschall Hermann Emil Gottfried von Eichhorn it is John, well played, though Pete clearly knew him but for some reason omitted to provide us with his name.

http://www.historyofwar.org/articles/people_eichhorn_hermann.html

The highest ranking German to be killed in WW1, though as you and Ron spotted there were actually two listed of the same rank, but von Bulow died in 1921.

He is buried next to von Schlieffen, and was murdered by Boris Mikhailovich Donskoy, a Russian terrorist-revolutionary. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boris_Donskoy

Seen here taking a moment to reflect upon his actions:

526885238.jpg.056f018b99fb5fd0af45f00631e7060f.jpg

Thanks for the picture of John Lauder's grave. I have recently read several very moving accounts from his father, (who writes beautifully) on the struggles he bore coping with his son's death and visits to his grave etc.

The name of the book escapes me at the moment, and as I am still incapacitated I can't look at my books, but Harry's words actually brought tears to my eyes.

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Uncle George

Harry Lauder's book:

 

http://www.gutenberg.org/cache/epub/11211/pg11211-images.html

 

"My whole perspective was changed by my visit to the front. Never again shall I know those moments of black despair that used to come to me. In my thoughts I shall never be far away from the little cemetery hard by the Bapaume road. And life would not be worth the living for me did I not believe that each day brings me nearer to seeing him again."

 

 

Speaking of David, I see we are on page 300. 

 

 

 

 

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neverforget
18 minutes ago, Uncle George said:

Harry Lauder's book:

 

http://www.gutenberg.org/cache/epub/11211/pg11211-images.html

 

"My whole perspective was changed by my visit to the front. Never again shall I know those moments of black despair that used to come to me. In my thoughts I shall never be far away from the little cemetery hard by the Bapaume road. And life would not be worth the living for me did I not believe that each day brings me nearer to seeing him again."

 

 

Speaking of David, I see we are on page 300. 

 

 

 

 

Thanks for that link. The accounts I read were in someone else's book, which infuriatingly still escapes me. I wasn't aware of Lauder's book before you brought it to my attention, but when my wife comes to visit me later I will ask her to put it on my letter to Father Christmas 👍

I've just noticed that page 300 has coincided with my passing 3,000 posts.

Edited by neverforget

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Knotty

Can we identify this chap and his place in history?

BCCCE456-0651-4AE3-9221-407B483C662E.jpeg

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voltaire60

   Harry Fusao  O'Hara- born Tokyo 1891, fighter pilot RFC/RAF in the Great War.  His claim to fame?  Narrowed it down to one of 2

 

1)  The only Japanese fighter pilot  on the Western Front

 

2)  The first man to have dentures fitted in Sidcup in 1923.

 

      Tough call.

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neverforget
30 minutes ago, voltaire60 said:

   Harry Fusao  O'Hara- born Tokyo 1891, fighter pilot RFC/RAF in the Great War.  His claim to fame?  Narrowed it down to one of 2

 

1)  The only Japanese fighter pilot  on the Western Front

 

2)  The first man to have dentures fitted in Sidcup in 1923.

 

      Tough call.

It is indeed the bizarrely named O'Hara, and he may well have been the first man to have dentures fitted in Sidcup, but I don't think he was the only "nip in the air" (forgive me) on the Western Front.

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voltaire60
1 hour ago, neverforget said:

It is indeed the bizarrely named O'Hara, and he may well have been the first man to have dentures fitted in Sidcup, but I don't think he was the only "nip in the air" (forgive me) on the Western Front.

 

      Then the pioneer of dentures in Sidcup in 1923 it must be-by a process of elimination

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Knotty

Well done gents, it is indeed Harry Fusao O’Hara, “allegedly” the only RFC/RAF Japanese pilot on the Western Front.

Born in 1891 he was also a soldier of the Indian Army, in 1914, serving with the 34th Sikh Pioneers in Mesopotamia until December 1915 whereupon he transferred to the Middlesex Regiment serving in France and during this time he was awarded his MM, in March 1917 he transferred to RFC and passed his flying certificate in July 1917. Rules did not allow him to be an officer but as a sargeant he was allowed to fly and as such joined No.1 Squadron Flying SE 5a, he was wounded in June 1918 and at this point the Sidcup connection comes in with his facial injury.

He married Muriel McDonald in 1917 and lived in London after the war,  declared an alien at the outbreak of WW2 he was not interned, and he died in 1951.

 

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