Jump to content
Great War Forum

Remembered Today:

  • Announcements

    • GWF TEAM

      Minor changes to the Forum   12/12/17

      We have altered the structure of the Home Fronts and Uniforms, Arms, Insignia, Equipment & Medals boards. We have removed the sub-category headings and now each board is more visible and easier to find. We have also renamed "About this website" and "Using theTechnology" to make it clearer where to post questions about the GWF website. We have also put a link ot the forum Rules on the main menu at the top to make them easier to find - particularly the section regarding requesting look ups on subscription sites such as Ancestry. Finally, for those who visit Skindles, there is a pinned post there detailing some changes to it.   Regards The GWF Admin Team
Stoppage Drill

Who is This ? ? ?

Recommended Posts

neverforget

I assume that given my last clue you have picked up on the fact that we are talking Gurkhas?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Knotty

Hi nf

I have Gurkhas, 39th Garhwal Rifles and a couple of other Indian regiments using kukris

But I have now another clue.....Gurkhas:thumbsup:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
neverforget

His regimental obituary said that they had lost an officer impossible to replace, and certainly one of the very best. 

The Gurkhas who served under him said that there was nobody to compare to him.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
helpjpl
On 6 December 2017 at 10:01, neverforget said:

Another remarkable chap with connections to an Indian regiment:

20171206_100340.jpg.6439ec8d8b0117933b1fcd56c47ed037.jpg

 

 

Walter Greville Bagot-Chester MC,  3rd Queen Alexandra's Own Gurkha Rifles.

 

https://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/651859/bagot-chester,-walter-greville/

 

http://ww1.nam.ac.uk/stories/captain-walter-bagot-chester/#.WikuHkvfZEI

 

JP

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
neverforget

You have put John out of his misery JP.

Well done. Walter Bagot-Chester it is. 

http://ww1.nam.ac.uk/stories/captain-walter-bagot-chester/#.WikzQp-nzqA

As previously discussed here on the forum:

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Knotty

Thanks JP

I have been chasing my tail on this one, Queen Alexandra’s was a long way down the list alphabetically, so I now have a free afternoon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Knotty

Inspired by NF, and searching here’s another MC winner, nothing major notable  but an interesting pedigree and career, this is for starters :-

A member of the aristocracy he was born in France and pre-war served in the Austro-Hungarian Army for several years.

065E8A23-3890-43BD-95B4-B289DCF75017.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
neverforget
48 minutes ago, Knotty said:

Inspired by NF, and searching here’s another MC winner, nothing major notable  but an interesting pedigree and career, this is for starters :-

A member of the aristocracy he was born in France and pre-war served in the Austro-Hungarian Army for several years.

065E8A23-3890-43BD-95B4-B289DCF75017.jpeg

His c.v. rings a bell for sure, but my memory completely fails me.

The search begins 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
QGE
1 hour ago, Knotty said:

Inspired by NF, and searching here’s another MC winner, nothing major notable  but an interesting pedigree and career, this is for starters :-

A member of the aristocracy he was born in France and pre-war served in the Austro-Hungarian Army for several years.

065E8A23-3890-43BD-95B4-B289DCF75017.jpeg

 

William  Orpen was the artist...so a narrow clientele. His portrait of Sir Adrian carton de Wiart* is possibly the definitive image of WWI Officers.  I shan't spoil it...

 

* His water colours owe a lot to William Russell Flint. A brilliant and bad artist at the same time. Did some interesting RNAS sketches. A wasted talent in the Great War. I digress.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Knotty
40 minutes ago, QGE said:

I shan't spoil it.

 

Thanks MG:thumbsup:

A portrait not often seen.

Edited by Knotty

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Fattyowls

I know John's mystery officer and Carton de Wiart VC are only a sample of two but both of them look less than cheery. I suppose if you'd been wounded as many times as C de W you'd look grumpy. Still haven't got a clue who the first man is but it's been v. educational.

 

Pete.

 

P.S. I've just looked up Flint and found a picture of Watergate St in Chester which surprised me for some reason. I'd not come across him before and the websites I found look showed a very varied set of paintings. Some reminded me of Alma-Tadema, some I couldn't begin to describe.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
neverforget
2 hours ago, QGE said:

 

William  Orpen was the artist...so a narrow clientele. His portrait of Sir Adrian carton de Wiart* is possibly the definitive image of WWI Officers.  I shan't spoil it...

 

* His water colours owe a lot to William Russell Flint. A brilliant and bad artist at the same time. Did some interesting RNAS sketches. A wasted talent in the Great War. I digress.

Orpen's portraits are instantly recognisable for sure. I think your tongue was firmly in cheek when you said that this narrowed it down, he being so incredibly prolific.

I absolutely recognise this chap, both by the picture, and the profile that Nohn has given him, but cannot for the life of me bring him to mind.

Once I had disclosed that Bagot-Chester was a Gurkha officer, I fully expected you to come in and nail him.

His account of the action at the mosque reminded me of the Alamo.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Knotty

My contender for WIT was precluded from enlisting and fighting for his country of birth on political grounds.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
neverforget
12 hours ago, Knotty said:

My contender for WIT was precluded from enlisting and fighting for his country of birth on political grounds.

I think I have him John, though he wasn't the person my faulty memory was trying to recollect.

Prince Antoine d'Orleans et Braganza?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Knotty

Well done NF that’s the fellow

As I said what a strange pedigree, it gets better to find out he was with the CEF, then into the RFC, finishing up as a-d-c for “Warhorse” Seely’s staff,before going to the War Office. Tragically killed in an air accident a fortnight after the Armistice.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prince_Antônio_Gastão_of_Orléans-Braganza

The link probably doesn’t do him and his career justice, so I personally would like to find ut some more.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
neverforget

I see that his full name was quite a mouthful, Antônio Gastão Luiz Filipe Francisco de Assis Maria Miguel Rafael Gabriel Gonzaga. No wonder his family preferred to call him Toto.

As you say quite a colourful background.

Extensive library information about him does seem to be rather sparse though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
neverforget

Allo allo, what have we here then.

This chap's contribution to the war may have been slightly overstated, but credit where credit's due, he probably did save about half a million lives, and brought the end of the war forward by a considerable amount.

pc.jpg.b16977aadb14518ffabdb38065b58e41.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Knotty

Evening all

Ok NF I’ll make a start and say that with your opening, it looks like he was definitely a member of the Constabulary, but god knows which one!

Half a million lives saved initially suggest he was either a politician or military strategist, I'm probably barking up the wrong tree.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
neverforget

He was a Welsh copper, but no military strategist or politician.

His claim to fame stems from a discovery he inadvertently made whilst serving as a soldier.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
EDWARD1

Lt Ernest Rollings discovered the Defence Plans of the Hindenberg Line

Eddie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
voltaire60
2 minutes ago, EDWARD1 said:

Lt Ernest Rollings discovered the Defence Plans of the Hindenberg Line

Eddie

 

  And got shot in the head-  in army service rather than a particularly nasty Saturday night somewhere in the Principality. A great story about finding the plans- but it begs the question I have raised elsewhere on Forum- Where is all this captured German documents stuff from the Great War????   Destroyed, still locked away?  Best offer so far is that it was chucked out en masse  with the culling of the Quatermaster-General's library in the early 1960s. Not so sure about that- so any references to captured German docs.post-war would be welcome from Forum pals

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
neverforget

Rollings it is. Already featured on the forum but until now not on W.I.T.

"Never let the facts get in the way of a good story", and this is indeed a good story.

http://www.walesonline.co.uk/news/wales-news/welshman-whose-extraordinary-discovery-ended-14005343

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Knotty

Moving away from UK personnel, this chap was both a winner and loser of battles, and he later became a national turncoat but was removed, he even had a penchant  to rewrite his history.

C0D4E46B-30C3-45EB-8ABF-698E7636BB3A.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Fattyowls
5 hours ago, neverforget said:

Rollings it is. Already featured on the forum but until now not on W.I.T.

"Never let the facts get in the way of a good story", and this is indeed a good story.

http://www.walesonline.co.uk/news/wales-news/welshman-whose-extraordinary-discovery-ended-14005343

 

A Welsh scrum half told me of a rugby tour which degenerated into a very drunken sing song in a boozer. The constabulary were called and the wise old sergeant said to the team: "Lads, there's nothing like a good sing song, and this is nothing like a good sing song". Everybody dissolved into laughter and the singers got down off the tables, pulled up their trousers and not another off key note was sung.

 

There's nothing like a good WW1 story and this is nothing like a good WW1 story. It's so inaccurate it's hard to know where to start......

 

Good post though when you peel back the tissue of lies and the farrago of half truths.

 

Pete.

Edited by Fattyowls
Original grammar of a language other than English

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
voltaire60
32 minutes ago, Fattyowls said:

There's nothing like a good WW1 story and this is nothing like a good WW1 story. It's so inaccurate it's hard to know where to start......

 

Good post though when you peel back the tissue of lies and the farrago of half truths.

 

 

     Try the story  of Colonel A.P.Scotland (London Cage) and the tale in "Blackwoods" about him serving as Schottland in German South West.  It was "bo****s  that would  adorn an African elephant.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×