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jainvince

US Base Hospital No 5 London

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jainvince

The picture below has recently been donated to the Littleborough History Centre www.littleboroughshistory.org and on the rear is an address

Pte A Simpson

US Base Hospital Unit 5

c/o Sir Alfred Keough

War Dept

London

Other than the picture we know the lady within whose family collection it resided and they had a WW1 casualty but this name isn't known to us. It may be of interest to some members on the forum

Bernard

post-23884-0-73293400-1419355581_thumb.j

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4thGordons

Is it possible to make out what is on the sleeve badges of the two top left Americans. As far as I can see, apart from two sets of collar discs this is the only potentially identifiable insignia.

post-14525-0-56379500-1419357531_thumb.j

Chris

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4thGordons

From the OFFICE OF MEDICAL HISTORY

BASE HOSPITAL NO. 5f

Base Hospital No.5 was organized in February, 1916, at the Harvard University, and was mobilized in May, 1917. The unit left New York May 11, 1917, on the Saxonia and arrived at Falmouth, England, May 22, 1917, and at Boulogne, France on May 30, 1917. It was assigned to the British Expeditionary Force in France and was ordered to take over British General Hospital No. 11. This hospital was situated between the towns of Dannes and Camiers, Department Pas de Calais. It functioned there until November 1, 1917, when it was transferred to Boulogne sur Mer, where it took over and operated British General Hospital No. 13.

While at Dannes-Camiers, Base Hospital No. 5 frequently was attacked by enemy aircraft, and on the night of September 4, 1917, suffered several casualties. Lieut. William T. Fitzsimons, M. C., was killed, Lieuts. Rae W. Whidden, Thaddeus D. Smith, and Clarence A. McGuire, M. C., were wounded. Lieutenants Whidden and Smith subsequently died. Three enlisted men were killed and five severely wounded; one nurse and twenty-two patients were wounded. These deaths were the first among the American Expeditionary Forces due to enemy activity.

The hospital occupied a large municipal building, the bed capacity of which was 650. During its activity, June 1, 1917, to January 20, 1919, this

f
The statements of fact appearing herein are based on the "History, Base Hospital No. 5, A. E. F.," by Maj. Henry Lyman, M. C., while on duty as a member of the staff of that hospital. The history is on file in the Historical Division, S. G. O., Washington, D. C.-
Ed
.

633

hospital cared for 45,837 patients, both surgical and medical. Of this number 41,015 were British and 4,822 Americans. The greatest number of patients admitted in one day was 964.

The unit was relieved from duty with the British on January 20, 1919, and sailed from Brest, France, April 7, 1919, on the Graf Waldersee, arriving at New York April 20, 1919. The unit was demobilized May 2, 1919, at Camp Devens, Mass.

PERSONNEL

COMMANDING OFFICER

Col. Robert U. Patterson, M. C., May 5, 1917, to February 27, 1918.
Lieut. Col. Roger I. Lee, M. C., February 28, 1918, to September 6, 1918.
Maj. Henry Lyman, M. C., September 7, 1918, to demobilization.

CHIEF OF MEDICAL SERVICE

Lieut. Col. Roger I. Lee, M. C.
Maj. Reginald Fitz, M. C.

CHIEF OF SURGICAL SERVICE

Lieut. Col. Horace Binney, M. C.

THERE IS ALSO A HISTORY OF BASE HOSPITAL No5 HERE

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4thGordons

Looking at the picture in conjunction with the history above -- Is it possible that this was taken outside a boarding house in Blackpool? It appears to show two entrances: one to Number 70 Ivy House, Proprietor Mrs Parfitt and Number 72?, Hollin(???) House.

Perhaps a look over business registers or such might reveal something?

None of the men shown appear to be officers although it is hard to be sure.

Chris

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