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SMG65

´Unknown` German Trench System - Mastenbos

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SMG65

After two days in Ypres I am now visiting friends near Antwerp.

Today they took me to the Mastenbos which consists of two lines of German trench systems and 56 untouched German pillboxes, most accessible.

Excavated last year it was built in 1917 as part of the German defensive positions of Antwerp, they also reused it in 1944.

I´ll post some pictures when I get home but if you google Mastenbos it should bring it up, albeit in Flemish but with some good pictures.

I also visited a reconstruction of the ´dodenzone`, (deadzone), which was the border between Belgium and Holland with the 5 yards between the border wire being the deadzone.

The reconstruction is built on the actual site of the border, however it is 4 miles from the Dutch border in Belgium, near Kalmthout?

Sean

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AOK4

After two days in Ypres I am now visiting friends near Antwerp.

Today they took me to the Mastenbos which consists of two lines of German trench systems and 56 untouched German pillboxes, most accessible.

Excavated last year it was built in 1917 as part of the German defensive positions of Antwerp, they also reused it in 1944.

I´ll post some pictures when I get home but if you google Mastenbos it should bring it up, albeit in Flemish but with some good pictures.

I also visited a reconstruction of the ´dodenzone`, (deadzone), which was the border between Belgium and Holland with the 5 yards between the border wire being the deadzone.

The reconstruction is built on the actual site of the border, however it is 4 miles from the Dutch border in Belgium, near Kalmthout?

Sean

Hello,

A few years ago, a two volume book was published about these trenches and bunkers: Vergeten Linies.

The "dodendraad" as the electric fence on the Belgian-Dutch border was called, was not built right on the border, it was always built completely on Belgian territory and some parts of Belgium were in no man's land, f.i. the three "humps" in the province of Antwerp...

Jan

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roel22
it was always built completely on Belgian territory and some parts of Belgium were in no man's land

In that case the Dutch probably let the Belgians pay for the entire fence... :whistle:

Roel

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AOK4

In that case the Dutch probably let the Belgians pay for the entire fence... :whistle:

Roel

Huh? The "dodendraad" was built by the Germans to prevent Belgians getting out of the country, the Dutch had nothing to do with it.

Jan

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roel22

:doh:

Unbelievable.

Next time I'll think before I post...

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trajan

In that case the Dutch probably let the Belgians pay for the entire fence... :whistle:

Huh? The "dodendraad" was built by the Germans to prevent Belgians getting out of the country, the Dutch had nothing to do with

:doh:

Unbelievable.

Next time I'll think before I post...

Hah, Roel, I guess you were - ahem - 'Trumped' there... :thumbsup: Actually, if I recall correctly, there is something in Andy Lucas' book on the Saxons about German casualties caused from - I assume - deserters trying to cross the fence...

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SMG65

I think that this is worth a diversion for tour companies en route to/coming back from Arnhem.

Sean

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