Jump to content
Great War Forum

Remembered Today:

  • Announcements

    • GWF TEAM

      Minor changes to the Forum   12/12/17

      We have altered the structure of the Home Fronts and Uniforms, Arms, Insignia, Equipment & Medals boards. We have removed the sub-category headings and now each board is more visible and easier to find. We have also renamed "About this website" and "Using theTechnology" to make it clearer where to post questions about the GWF website. We have also put a link ot the forum Rules on the main menu at the top to make them easier to find - particularly the section regarding requesting look ups on subscription sites such as Ancestry. Finally, for those who visit Skindles, there is a pinned post there detailing some changes to it.   Regards The GWF Admin Team
Gareth Davies

Kut Surrender

Recommended Posts

seaJane

!!!

Did anyone see the Yearsley (450 miles to Freedom) material at Ightham Mote on Antiques Roadshow?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MikeyH

Yes I did, seems that the lady actually threw away some of the items found in the attic!

 

Mike.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
seaJane

I know, aaarghh!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
healdav
3 hours ago, seaJane said:

I know, aaarghh!

I went to a small archive in a communtiy centre here a few years ago.

They were busy throwing out all the records of the slave labourers who had worked in the steel works down the road during the last war, so as to make space for TV magazines and a couple of ther really important things.

I managed to save a few clip files, but the vast majority had already gone.

"What does anyone want with all that old paper" was the reply when I remonstrated.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
charlie962
Posted (edited)

Just a reminder that 450 miles is available on Archive.org here

 

Charlie (thanks to prev posting by forumite Maureene  )

Edited by charlie962

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
charlie962
On 29/07/2016 at 17:59, seaJane said:

Russell Braddon's The Siege includes quotations from both officers and other ranks via diaries and notebooks which were lent to him for the duration of his research. I'd be very interested to know where those diaries may now be,

 

The diaries were almost certainly returned. It was the questionnaires he sent to all those survivors still living in 1960s, plus the subsequent  records of selective interviews he carried out that I was keen to unearth.  He does reference his quotes to the original corresponder and I have checked and identified most of the names listed in the Acknowledgements and the Notes.

 

I found where probably his only surviving papers are held and I also came across a recent biography of Braddon by Dr Nigel Starck of Australia. I contacted him to see what he knew and he kindly replied by return:

                                         ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

"Russ Braddon destroyed his papers before leaving London in 1993. In the biography, I refer to this obsession with privacy – and to the measure of salvation supplied by Jim Whitehand, his companion and business manager:

 

Intent still upon camouflage, he wrote to Pat, the ‘gorgeous sister’, proclaiming his relief at having destroyed ‘six large plastic bagsful’ of letters and other memorabilia: ‘I feel better now they’re gone … all the yellowing paperwork of the curious career I enjoyed between 1949 and 1992.’

 

 Unknown to him, however, and for reasons of class and a natural ‘magpie’ inclination, James (Jim) Whitehand – his first long-term companion in shared domesticity and his business manager for forty years – had saved other material. Today, it forms the bulk of the Braddon collection in Canberra, offering a vivid impression of literary life in London and Australia from 1949 to 1995:

 

I was a working-class boy, and I couldn’t bear to see all those letters and photographs thrown out. I even found something that Prince Philip had written for one of his books. Russ had just chucked it in the wastepaper

 

My specific reflections on how this practice affected records of The Siege are contained in the attachment to this email (an extract* from Chapter 15 of the biography). I waded through the National Library holdings and found only an Iraqi press pass and a note from the Turkish ambassador to Britain.

 

My book would have lacked much of its authority without Jim’s intervention. It took some sustained detective work to find him (living in a Lincolnshire village) – when I did track him down, he proclaimed his determination to see the work published. It was not to be, though; Jim died a few months after our meeting.

 

 I sense that Braddon relished his encounters with the siege survivors, finding much in common with them. He shared in particular their dislike of certain officers’ privileges.

(Dr) Nigel Starck"

                                        ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

So now we know.  *The interesting 6pp pdf extract from the biography I can copy to anyone interested.

 

This is the wiki page on Braddon and gives the detail of Dr Starck's book.

 

5a2997dbcb834_BraddonRussellwiki.JPG.965f4ba551abc6cae57f6dd4a38a9d58.JPG

 

 

I am still on the lookout for Lady Neave's papers!

Charlie

 

Charlie

 

 

Edited by charlie962

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
charlie962
On 06/08/2016 at 21:17, David Filsell said:

I have had experience of trying to find source  material for two dead writers whose subject was the Great War. In these cases no one knew. Probably simply junked as the author moved I suspect

You are far too clever!

Charlie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
seaJane
4 hours ago, charlie962 said:

The interesting 6pp pdf extract from the biography I can copy to anyone interested.

If you can pm it to me I'd be delighted - alternatively let me know if you'd prefer to send it by email.

 

sJ

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Eastindia
On 17/06/2016 at 17:08, SJ CLARK said:

I was given a handwritten account of the surrender and the treatment the soldiers received. The soldier who wrote this account was a radio operator at the time of the surrender.

 

SJC

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Eastindia

Fantastic Charlie. I had not encountered Archive. Org before but in following up on your quote, lo and behold there are four books by prisoners taken at the Kut surrender available to read on line free of charge, though a donation is requested. That is my weekend accounted for 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×