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Remembered Today:

Daveleic

Artillery damage: is this normal?

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WhiteStarLine

Hi Ken and welcome to the forum.  If you visit https://www.awm.gov.au/collection/C1344256?image=11 and look at pages 17 and 19 you can see a narrative and map of the operation for that day.  You may already have seen his details at the AIF database at https://www.aif.adfa.edu.au/showPerson?pid=66130.

 

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KennyD
15 hours ago, WhiteStarLine said:

Hi Ken and welcome to the forum.  If you visit https://www.awm.gov.au/collection/C1344256?image=11 and look at pages 17 and 19 you can see a narrative and map of the operation for that day.  You may already have seen his details at the AIF database at https://www.aif.adfa.edu.au/showPerson?pid=66130.

 

Thank you firstly for the welcome - much appreciated...  And thank you, secondly, for the links - HUGELY appreciated!!!

Cheers, Ken.

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Gunner Bailey
On 20/05/2017 at 10:56, MikeMeech said:

The use of Shrapnel for wire-cutting was logical as it was found in experiments in January 1915 when British artillery was fired at replicas of German defensive positions that shrapnel performed better than HE (see page 72 of Marble).  It was far from perfect, artillery observers would go out to see how wire-cutting was progressing. 

Mike

 

The problem with these experiments was that they used British barbed wire for the tests not German or Austrian. Both of which were a much heavier gauge. This resulted in at least 18 months of ineffective wire cutting. As was seen on the Somme in July 1916 a barrage lasting days still resulted in soldiers facing uncut wire.

 

Most shrapnel shells were planned to fire their shrapnel balls when 30 - 50 feet above and in front of the target. There is a interesting piece of film in 'The Great War' DVD set showing this happening.

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squirrel
1 hour ago, Gunner Bailey said:

 

The problem with these experiments was that they used British barbed wire for the tests not German or Austrian. Both of which were a much heavier gauge. This resulted in at least 18 months of ineffective wire cutting. As was seen on the Somme in July 1916 a barrage lasting days still resulted in soldiers facing uncut wire.

 

Most shrapnel shells were planned to fire their shrapnel balls when 30 - 50 feet above and in front of the target. There is a interesting piece of film in 'The Great War' DVD set showing this happening.

Interesting fact and one that is commonly overlooked. Much of the German wire on the Somme was on a reverse slope making accurate registration and observation of fall of shot almost impossible despite the assistance of the RFC. Also there were days when the weather was less than helpful for observation purposes. 

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Robert Dunlop

Here is a quote from one of the artillery officers who reviewed the effectiveness of wire cutting during the Battle of the Somme:

 

Robert

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Gunner Bailey

I've got loads of shrapnel balls which have clearly hit wire and the ball seems to have come off worse, with grooves and wire like dents in them.

 

I've always found the thought of lead cutting steel odd because of the materials.

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