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Michelle Young

We Are All Flourishing

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Michelle Young

Edited by Jan Chojecki and Michael Lo Cicero, this is the letters and diary of Captain Walter Coats MC. I thought this was an excellent book, published by Helion, it is the letters and diary of Walter Coats taking the reader from Mobilisation in August 1914 to his eventual demobilisation in May 1919. 

Printed on excellent quality paper, with footnotes  instead of the annoying end of chapters notes, and well illustrated, I thoroughly recommend this book.

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simond9x

Just bought this and started it last night. Beautifully produced book (as you'd expect from Helion), I'll report back when I've finished reading it.

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Muerrisch

Footnotes!

 

Always my favourite way of presenting supplementary information. The only potential problem is where they threaten to overwhelm the actual diary or account.  They must never ever be allowed to spill on to the next double page, so need careful editing and discipline. The reader might just be less interested in "what the general had for breakfast" than the editor/ author.

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Steven Broomfield

End Notes or Foot Notes?, that is the question.

 

I prefer foot notes for the supplementary stuff, but end notes for source notes and references.

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trajan

I'm a footnote person myself, endnotes at a pinch. What I do abhor, though, is that so-called Harvard system, of author's name and page no. in parentheses... In fact, I dislike it so much so that I no longer submit any of my articles to a certain journal which uses that style...

 

Oh, and while on footnotes, one source I came across while doing my Ph.D., and needed to use, was: A History of Northumberland, in Three Parts, Part II, vol IIi, (1840), which - according to my jottings - has a footnote on Roman frontiers and the like in Britannia, which starts on p. 257 and ends on p. 324, with footnotes within the footnote, if you see what I mean... As I recall it, for the first 20 or so pages there are about two lines of regular text at the head of the page, after which the footnote takes over the pages proper...

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ss002d6252
36 minutes ago, trajan said:

I'm a footnote person myself, endnotes at a pinch. What I do abhor, though, is that so-called Harvard system, of author's name and page no. in parentheses... In fact, I dislike it so much so that I no longer submit any of my articles to a certain journal which uses that style...

 

Oh, and while on footnotes, one source I came across while doing my Ph.D., and needed to use, was: A History of Northumberland, in Three Parts, Part II, vol IIi, (1840), which - according to my jottings - has a footnote on Roman frontiers and the like in Britannia, which starts on p. 257 and ends on p. 324, with footnotes within the footnote, if you see what I mean... As I recall it, for the first 20 or so pages there are about two lines of regular text at the head of the page, after which the footnote takes over the pages proper...

I hate in-line Harvard referencing - the books I have being writing use a number and an associated foot note and how I reference within the footnote is my own choice.

Craig

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Muerrisch

Unanimity on footnotes so far ............ I tell myself it cannot last.

 

Unless the main text is a personal diary or is autobiographical, the very act of adding a footnote requires a substantial decision from the editor/author; " does the reader need/ want this footnote?". 

 

On the other hand, endnotes can apparently be ladled on, with no constraint other than the publisher's demands. 

 

I confess that endnotes get scant attention unless an aspect screams for further reading .............. and then I lose the text page from which I departed.

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trajan
1 hour ago, Muerrisch said:

... I confess that endnotes get scant attention unless an aspect screams for further reading .............. and then I lose the text page from which I departed.

 

Well, if the footnote is there then the need to know what's in it is quickly satisfied without having to tear away from the page in question and go to the endnotes and risk loosing the thread, as it were. With endnotes, my solution is to use two bookmarks, by the way, but I often find that the endnote I want to check is a page or so ahead of the bookmark place from when I last needed to check one...:( Now, let's not get onto things like op cit in a foot/endnote when there is no page reference to where the original citation is to be found...:angry:

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Ron Clifton
On 6/18/2017 at 14:29, Steven Broomfield said:

End Notes or Foot Notes?, that is the question.

 

I prefer foot notes for the supplementary stuff, but end notes for source notes and references.

I totally agree.

 

Ron

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squirrel
On 15/06/2017 at 07:36, Michelle Young said:

Edited by Jan Chojecki and Michael Lo Cicero, this is the letters and diary of Captain Walter Coats MC. I thought this was an excellent book, published by Helion, it is the letters and diary of Walter Coats taking the reader from Mobilisation in August 1914 to his eventual demobilisation in May 1919. 

Printed on excellent quality paper, with footnotes  instead of the annoying end of chapters notes, and well illustrated, I thoroughly recommend this book.

Couldn't agree more - a superb read and a IMHO an important addition to the library of anyone with an interest in WW1.

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Black Maria

As the supply of the books on my wants list has dried up together with my money:) I have decided to buy some of the newer books on the

market . With the centenary there are so many new memoirs , letters/ diaries around that it is difficult to sort the good from the not so good.

I made the mistake of buying a memoir a while back that seemed like 80% of it was background info by the editor .

 

I now am a bit more discerning and try to check as many reviews as I can before buying . I have been lucky in that the two books I have recently

acquired ( Eton to Ypres and Veteran Volunteer ) have been very good . I received my copy of  'We are flourishing' today and it does look a

quality publication , although I do note that it has ( hands over ears DJC ) laminated boards instead of a jacket !

 

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Black Maria

Finished reading my copy and agree it's very good. As with a lot of these types of books you really get a good impression of how much of an

awful ordeal the battle of the Somme was to those who were involved in it.

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