Remembered Today:

Kitchener's Bugle

Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwyll-llantysiliogogogoch

45 posts in this topic

Yes perhaps its the longest name location for any War Memorial :D

 

Located of course on the Island of Anglesey, North Wales.

 

As always please take what images you need.

a1.jpg

The Plaques:-

a3.jpg

a5.jpg

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a2.jpg

a6.jpg

a7.jpg

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As ever, Mr Bugle, thanks.

 

Can anyone translate the Welsh inscription, please? Also interesting to see the Second World War is in English: changing demographics?

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Ah.

Happy memories.

I used to pass this memorial every day on the way to school.

My grandfather lived in the terrace virtually opposite when he attested in 1915.

The red house in the background is Ty Coch (Red House), home of the famour Welsh scholar, Sir John Morris Jones, whose niece taught me in school.

 

The bad news.....You have spelled it wrong! One too many 'Y's. See if you can find it.

3 minutes ago, Steven Broomfield said:

As ever, Mr Bugle, thanks.

 

Can anyone translate the Welsh inscription, please?

 

"The Great War"

 

An emblem of affection and admiration for our brave ones who gave their lives for country and King on land and sea".

 

 

7 minutes ago, Steven Broomfield said:

Also interesting to see the Second World War is in English: changing demographics?

 

Not much change really until very much later.

Still a predominantly Welsh speaking village and area.

More to do with the assertion of Britishness over Welshness that 2 World Wars, and a Great Depression had entailed.

 

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Thanks, Dai Bach.

 

I didn't realise you could have too many Y's in Welsh.

I must ask: L/Cpl Parry lived at "Hen Shop". Please tell me that's not a shop selling hens.

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ID: 6   Posted (edited)

 

Sad to see two Stewards from the village, both lost on the 'Laurentic'.

Somewhere I have a very long platform ticket from the station.

 

Mike.

 

Edited by MikeyH

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Nice memorial, Interesting to see the name J F Lewis of the 51st Cheshire's.  John Lewis died on the 5th June 1918 from wounds received on 31st May 1918 whilst serving with the 9th Cheshire's. 

 

More interesting that none of them died in Belgium 

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Thanks for the pics KB

I'm assuming that the numbers are their ages? I've never seen casualty ages recorded on a war memorial before.

I think 'Hen Shop' may translate as 'Old Shop' but doesn't mean they didn't sell hens amongst other items

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1 minute ago, thetrenchrat22 said:

 

 

More interesting that none of them died in Belgium 

 

Or possibly the people responsible for the memorial didn't differentiate

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ID: 10   Posted (edited)

The CWGC records the age of John Lewis as 19, so the numbers must be there ages.  

 

Why no date of death

Edited by thetrenchrat22

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Just checked on the CWGC and W J Evans, 17 RWF, is buried at Mendinghem Cemetery, so it does look like 'France' and 'Belgium' are interchangeable.

 

I have to add that searching 'W J Evans' and 'Royal Welsh Fusiliers' is a long old job!

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ID: 12   Posted (edited)

William Weed. L/Cpl.

Occupation...... Gardener.

Really. He was a gardener, I think at Plas Newydd. Edit: No. It was Plas Llanfair.

The village has 3 memorials. None of them correspond exactly.

One at the church. This one (the clock). And one at the memorial hall.

There was  a split in the village between those that wanted a memorial hall ( basically at the instigation of the Marquess of Anglesey, with the support of his tenants and hierarchy in society) and some of the ex servicemen who wanted a more visible memorial in the village, to remember their fallen comrades.

The village was split, in many cases for the lifetimes of the protagonists.

One well known citizen (a land agent for the Marquess and a memorial hall man), would never look at the clock.

Whenever he had business to pass the clock, like going to the adjacent station, he would cross to the other side of the road, avert his gaze, or shield his eyes with his hand!

The story is told more fully in this book:

'Y Rhwyg' (The Schism).

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Rhwyg-Hanes-Rhyfel-Llanfair-Pwllgwyngyll/dp/1845274601/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1502638731&sr=8-1&keywords=Y+Rhwyg

 

In Welsh only.

By my brother, but some of the photos in it are mine.

Temporarily out of stock up the Amazon, but available from all good Welsh language bookshops, and some rubbish ones too.

 

Edited by Dai Bach y Sowldiwr

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I do hope no-one takes offence, but that reminds me of the Welshman who was rescued after 25 years stranded on a desert island. He had spent his time building not one, but two chapels. When asked why, he replied "That's the chapel I go to, and that's the chapel I don't go to."

 

Inter alia, I might recommend readers to Arm to Save Your Native Land, Army recruiting in North-West Wales 1914-1916, by Forum member Clive Hughes, which I had the pleasure to review for Stand To! recently.Excellent.

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2 hours ago, Steven Broomfield said:

As ever, Mr Bugle, thanks.

 

Can anyone translate the Welsh inscription, please? Also interesting to see the Second World War is in English: changing demographics?

The name means: Parish [church] of [St.] Mary (Llanfair) [in] Hollow (pwll) of the White Hazel [township] (gwyn gyll) near (go ger) the rapid whirlpool (y chwyrn drobwll) [and] the parish [church] of [St.] Tysilio (Llantysilio) with a red cave ([a]g ogo[f] goch).

 

See Wikipedia for further info.

 

Philip  

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Hope this isn't  too much of a digression, but it amazes me how Welsh language, a Celtic tongue, is so completely different from Scottish and Irish Gaelic which are very similar... Why?

 

Dave

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It's because Irish and Scottish Gaelic are Q-Celtic languages and Welsh and  Cornish are P-Celtic languages. 

 

So Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwyll-llantysiliogogooglegoch says.

 

Mike

 

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Thanks for clarifying that one, Mike. I feel a whole lot better-informed now.

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3 hours ago, Dai Bach y Sowldiwr said:

Ah.

Happy memories.

I used to pass this memorial every day on the way to school.

My grandfather lived in the terrace virtually opposite when he attested in 1915.

The red house in the background is Ty Coch (Red House), home of the famour Welsh scholar, Sir John Morris Jones, whose niece taught me in school.

 

The bad news.....You have spelled it wrong! One too many 'Y's. See if you can find it.

 

"The Great War"

 

An emblem of affection and admiration for our brave ones who gave their lives for country and King on land and sea".

 

 

 

Not much change really until very much later.

Still a predominantly Welsh speaking village and area.

More to do with the assertion of Britishness over Welshness that 2 World Wars, and a Great Depression had entailed.

 

 

Would it happen to be this fine old Terrace that I happened to snap?

Anglesey Terrace.jpg

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ID: 19   Posted (edited)

29 minutes ago, Kitchener's Bugle said:

 

Would it happen to be this fine old Terrace that I happened to snap?

 

That's correct, Britannia Terrace.

Attested from No 2.

In 1911, he lived at No3.

Either he moved next door, or perhaps the enumerator started counting from the other end!

Poignantly, JF Lewis (mentioned in post #7 above) was also from this terrace.

Fate eh?

This is the church memorial:

( The top inscription 'Ffyddlawn hyd Angau' = 'Faithful until Death'

Below: "Llais un gorthrymydd byth mwy ddaw i'w deffro i wylo mwy" = "Not one oppressor's voice will ever come to wake them to cry again".

tn_Eglwys, Cofeb.jpg

Edited by Dai Bach y Sowldiwr

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By sheer coincidence I was given a Platform Ticket for the very station only two weeks ago as below.

 

I was also given an envelope containing a piece of a German Zeppelin reportedly from the one that came down at Cuffley in Herts in 1916. It certainly is similar to the part of the girder shown in the Wikipedia entry. Likely it was one of the bits sold off.

 

5990923b75bba_PlatformTicket.jpg.da4065bf431b6b97e8841364b904b698.jpg

 

regards

 

Indefatigable

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ID: 21   Posted (edited)

Indefatigable?

Any link to the training school in the village?

Edited by Dai Bach y Sowldiwr

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4 hours ago, Steven Broomfield said:

 

I must ask: L/Cpl Parry lived at "Hen Shop". Please tell me that's not a shop selling hens.

Maybe a typo? Hen Siop (ponounced Shop) might mean Old Shop in Welsh (although I would have expected Siop Hen).

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1 hour ago, Steven Broomfield said:

Thanks for clarifying that one, Mike. I feel a whole lot better-informed now.

 

You're welcome. You might win Mastermind next time.

 

Haven't studied Welsh Regiments but can't remember ever seeing a Welsh named trench?

 

mike

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9 minutes ago, Skipman said:

 

You're welcome. You might win Mastermind next time.

 

Haven't studied Welsh Regiments but can't remember ever seeing a Welsh named trench?

 

mike

 

There was a Swansea Trench, somewhere near High Wood I think.

 

Mike

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41 minutes ago, seaJane said:

Maybe a typo? Hen Siop (ponounced Shop) might mean Old Shop in Welsh (although I would have expected Siop Hen).

No, not a typo I don't think.

Hen is one of the Welsh adjectives that almost always precedes the noun, whereas 'Newydd' (New) follows.

Colours (Bif-'Colors')  follow the noun.

Most adjectives follow the noun.

Although 'Siop' is the accepted form, 'Shop' is also used, and there is no difference in pronunciation in any case.

 

3 hours ago, Steven Broomfield said:

I do hope no-one takes offence, but that reminds me of the Welshman who was rescued after 25 years stranded on a desert island. He had spent his time building not one, but two chapels. When asked why, he replied "That's the chapel I go to, and that's the chapel I don't go to."

 

Oh please stop...my sides are splitting!

That joke seems to get funnier every time you tell it.:lol:

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