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johnnie

HMT Iceland and U-Boat actions December 1917

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johnnie

Dear All,

 

I was wondering if there was any way I could find out more about an action between HMT Iceland and a U-Boat on the 8th December 1917 which resulted in a chap named Robert Brightman Young, who I think was the skipper, being awarded the DSC.

 

I think Iceland was supposed to be in Area X (do members know where this is) and the citation states:

'For gallantry during an engagement with an enemy submarine of superior armament on 8/12/17.'

 

Any help at all would be great.

 

Johnnie

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seaJane

I can only find this, in July, but the citation might not have reached the London Gazette until December:

http://uboat.net/wwi/ships_hit/2953.html

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horatio2

Auxiliary Patrol Area X was (Great) Yarmouth. The ICELAND on seaJane's link is not the hired (Icelandic) trawler ICELAND (Admiralty No.3308).

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johnnie

Many thanks for confirming the Area X issue. 

 

There is an interesting post about a former crewman from HMT Iceland on this website:

 

http://facesmemorial.blogspot.co.uk/2007/07/upper-shader-siadar-iarach.html?m=1

 

Seaman MALCOLM MATHESON 
Last known address in Lewis: 10 Upper Shader
Son of Malcolm Matheson
Service unit: Royal Naval Reserve, HMT Iceland
Service number: 11907/DA
Date of death: 1 January 1919
Drowned in sinking of HMY Iolaire
Interred: Barvas (St Mary) Old Cemetery
Village memorial: North Lewis, Borve
Lewis War Memorial: Parish of Barvas, South division, panel 4
Had destroyed two Zeppelins in the North Sea while Gunner on HMT Iceland. Had gone to France with Seaforths in 1914, where he was mentioned in despatches, and subsequently served in Mesopotamia where he was so severely wounded that he was discharged.

 

 

Were many zeppelins shot down by trawlers?  

 

Johnnie

Edited by johnnie

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horatio2

I am inclined to take the zeppelin story with a pinch of salt. I can find no mention of an award to Matheson which I find unusual for a man who personally shot down two zeppelins. Perhaps someone else knows better.

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wightspirit

You are likely original reports at the National Archives. The main references are ADM137/528 (Auxiliary Patrol Weekly Reports, Area X, July to December 1917) and ADM137/1284 (North Sea; German submarines, various subjects, 1917).

 

Dave W

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johnnie
57 minutes ago, wightspirit said:

You are likely original reports at the National Archives. The main references are ADM137/528 (Auxiliary Patrol Weekly Reports, Area X, July to December 1917) and ADM137/1284 (North Sea; German submarines, various subjects, 1917).

 

Dave W

That's excellent. Many thanks. I'll have to try and dig them out when I'm next at Kew (whenever that might be).

 

 

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Nom Anor

Trawlers occasionally fired at zeppelins, but I don't think the loss of any German Navy zeppelin can be credited to trawler gunfire. I don't know about the German Army zeppelins, though.

Edited by Nom Anor

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Gilbert Salinas

I have been trying to find the name of the ship that my grandfather was aboard which was sunk by a German submarine while crossing the  English Chanel. My grandfather was in the U S Army and I have found the troop passenger list of the ship taking him to Europe (France) and the name of the ship returning him to Port of Boston, USA . The only story where my grandfathers name is mentioned was a short story written about a widow in South Texas and a neighbor that had a liking to the elderly widow. The short story goes on to mention that shortly after the end of the war a man by the name of Agapito Salinas had come to her home and told her of the pack her husband and he had made while at war in France. She goes on to say that (according to Agapito Salinas) the ship had more soldiers then they did life rafts (aboard this unknown ship). As the soldiers boarded they were given a number to the life raft which they should report to in the event that the ship sank. The pack was kept by my grandfather who reported to the widow what her husbands last words were ,”If I don’t make it please tell my wife that I fought with honor and that I wasn’t afraid to face death”. I have assume the ship was returning to England’s stageing Port before being returning to America. I would Appreciate anyone’s help in this matter, Thanks.

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johnboy

any idea of a date

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AlanCurragh
On 03/10/2017 at 01:39, Gilbert Salinas said:

I have been trying to find the name of the ship that my grandfather was aboard which was sunk by a German submarine while crossing the  English Chanel. My grandfather was in the U S Army and I have found the troop passenger list of the ship taking him to Europe (France) and the name of the ship returning him to Port of Boston, USA . The only story where my grandfathers name is mentioned was a short story written about a widow in South Texas and a neighbor that had a liking to the elderly widow. The short story goes on to mention that shortly after the end of the war a man by the name of Agapito Salinas had come to her home and told her of the pack her husband and he had made while at war in France. She goes on to say that (according to Agapito Salinas) the ship had more soldiers then they did life rafts (aboard this unknown ship). As the soldiers boarded they were given a number to the life raft which they should report to in the event that the ship sank. The pack was kept by my grandfather who reported to the widow what her husbands last words were ,”If I don’t make it please tell my wife that I fought with honor and that I wasn’t afraid to face death”. I have assume the ship was returning to England’s stageing Port before being returning to America. I would Appreciate anyone’s help in this matter, Thanks.

 

Gilbert - it might be easier for you to start a new topic with your request

 

Alan

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