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OwenMartin

How do I date my P14

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OwenMartin

Hi, 

ive had a Winchester P14 for a while now and I really want to know what year it was made and if it was ever used during the war but I can’t find a date on it, can anyone help me? 

Thanks 

Owen

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trenchtrotter

Have you tried a Google search. I think in the past i have found to dates for serial number ranges. The Americans made it easy on their M17s as the date was on the barrel.

 

As you know very few P14s saw any action. A small number used by snipers but rest for training only and mothballed till WW2 when issued to HG.

 

Good lick.

 

TT

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4thGordons

I can give you the date.

The dates are determined from a file in the National Archives (series MUN S/189)  from the British Arms Inspectors in the US Factories. Weekly Totals and monthly running totals of rifles inspectors accepted were recorded.

 

I believe WIN 143619 was accepted in the week ending March 3rd 1917,

Chris

 

As noted above the number of Pattern 14s  actually used in combat was very small.  Winchester rifles will have been massively overrepresented in this small number as the British selected only Winchester rifles for use of Marksman(F)/Sniper(T) rifles.

By the time yours was produced SMLE production had more than caught up and most of the rifles went straight into store (some being used for training in the UK) A large number were also sent to India directly from the factories (by observation most of these seem to have been Remington rifles)

Does yours still have the volley sight peep/dial complete? Most surviving rifles had these removed in the later 1930s/Early 1940s as they were removed from stores and went through the "Weedon Repair Standard" (WRS which included removing the volley sights and overhaul and repair) process to ready them for WWII service where they were mostly issued to Home Guard / LDV units. If the volley sights are missing have a look on the underside of the stock and you may well see a five pointed star with a letter in it stamped there - this indicates which facility the rifle went through for the WRS.

 

 

 

Edited by 4thGordons

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OwenMartin

Thank you for all the information I am quite new to it all but I am passionate about the Great War. I have found the Star and the letter above it is X what does this mean?

 

Thanks 

Owen

Edited by OwenMartin

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4thGordons

The X indicates the WRS work was done by Coggswell and Harrison who did 14,323 conversions

Chris

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OwenMartin

Thank you very much.

Owen

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trenchtrotter

Good stuff.

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