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tootrock

Emergency Landing Strips

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tootrock

I have twice been asked by people about Emergency Landing Strips in this area (East Sussex), and on each occasion I have had to confess that I know absolutely nothing.

Does anyone have any information about where such things were located, or indeed any information at all.

 

Thanks in advance,

 

Martin

 

 

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MrSwan

I've done a little work on this for one of my books. Emergency Landing Strips were identified and designated by the Royal Flying Corps to assist pilots in the event of technical or metereological mishap en route from one airfield to another. The ELS was flat, free from obstacles (and livestock) and, where possible, could be approached from any direction. I believe that they were extremely common, with one post-war report suggesting that, in the south east, they were some ten minutes' flying time apart.

 

Facilities were limited - a basic windsock and a shed with fuel and oil supplies. Some had telephones and some were manned, although I'm not sure if this was a twenty four hour service. There were also night landing strips which had much the same purpose, and used various light signals to mark their presence.

 

Rather than scouring the countryside for the downed airman, the local RFC would know the location and could retrieve the aircraft and crew efficiently.

 

I've found that many of these ELSs are mistakenly described as airfields in local memory.

  

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Moonraker

This doesn't answer Martin's question relating to Sussex, but I think
 

an airstrip near Market Lavington in Wiltshire

 

might qualify as an ELS.

 

There was a small airstrip at Manningford Bohune close to the Central Flying School at Upavon, but the only information about it that I've come across  says it was used by pilots to practice take-offs and landings.

 

Moonraker

 

 

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Maureene

 Cross & Cockade International (CCI) Journals contained a series of articles "Gazetteer of Flying Sites in the UK and Ireland 1912–1920", catalogue details.

 

Perhaps  a Forum member would know whether Emergency Landing Strips were included.

 

Cheers

Maureen

 

 

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MikeMeech
9 hours ago, Maureene said:

 Cross & Cockade International (CCI) Journals contained a series of articles "Gazetteer of Flying Sites in the UK and Ireland 1912–1920", catalogue details.

 

Perhaps  a Forum member would know whether Emergency Landing Strips were included.

 

Cheers

Maureen

 

 

Hi

 

Yes, 'Emergency Landing Strips' or rather Day and Night Landing Grounds are included in the CCI Gazetteer.  'Manningford' appears in the 'Additional Sites' in the Autumn 2015 journal, although not much info, just, "DLG 1916 for CFS Upavon, referred to in pilots' flying log books as 'the Manningford landing ground'."  There are many site plans plus the OS maps to give an overview of all air related sites.  The CCI Gazetteer is 'the' source for 'Flying site' information.

 

Mike

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tootrock

Thanks for all that.

 

Does anyone have access to this information? If so I am trying to locate a possible landing strip in the village of Pett, between Hastings and Winchelsea.

Any information gratefully received.

 

Martin

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MikeMeech
2 hours ago, tootrock said:

Thanks for all that.

 

Does anyone have access to this information? If so I am trying to locate a possible landing strip in the village of Pett, between Hastings and Winchelsea.

Any information gratefully received.

 

Martin

Hi

Details of Pett (Hastings)  is split between Autumn and Winter 2013 editions of CCI Journal.  The Autumn edition has the location map while the following edition has  the details.  The OS map reference for the site is noted as TQ 881150, 50 feet amsl.  Details are: Home Defence Night Landing Ground for 50 (HD) Sqn. RFC/RAF 12.1916 - 8.1918 (relinquished, probably due to its small size and limited approach by air).  A note states that a 53rd Wing 1918 survey of landing grounds stated that the LG was 300 yards wide.  The landing ground was under the control of 53rd Wing, HD Group, SE Area, VI Brigade 1918.

I hope that helps.

 

Mike

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