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Guest Gil

Field punishment number 2

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Guest Gil

Hello,

Could anyone enlighten me as to what Field Punishment number to stood for in the British Great War Army?

Thanks,

Gil

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fellop

Gil,

Have a look on the main site under;

"Tommy`s Life" sub section "In Trouble"

Chris has covered it very well and in a clear format even I can understand. :D

Regards

Peter.

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Guest Gil

Thanks mates. Have a nice Sylvester party and a happy and hopefuly peaceful new year.

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Alan Lines

I have listed below a few examples of FP No.2 "awarded" to members of the Canadian Expeditionary Force during 1917 "in the field".........

Sentenced to 28 days FP No.2 for When on Active service Masquerading as a Company Sergeant Major.

Sentenced to 10 days FP No.2 for When on active service

1. Absent from 7 a.m parade.

2. Absent without leave for 4 days 14 hours.

Also forfeits 5 days pay.

Sentenced to 10 days FP No. 2 for being absent without leave for 48.25 hours. Also forfeits 3 days pay.

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gunner

Thanks for those pointers on FP no2

My GF had 14 days for stealing potatoes.

I guess they were hungary in the RGA 110 battery

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Broznitsky

Just to expand on Chris' description on the main site:

Field Punishment No. 2 involved a soldier being shackled in irons, billeted in the guard room or tent when out of the line, loss of pay, heavy fatigues, and being inspected and compelled to drill for hours in full kit while being harassed and abused by NCOs.

I haven't been able to determine if being in or close to the front lines meant that shackles were not employed. I can't imagine somebody in the trenches being shackled!! Does anybody have any examples of shackling close to the action?? :unsure:

Peter in Vancouver

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mordac

Attachment from (page 223):

Field Service Pocket Book 1914 (Reprinted With Amendments 1916)

General Staff, War Office

Printed Under The Authority Of His Majesty's Stationary Office

By Harrison And Sons, 45-47 St. Martin's Lane, W.C.

Garth

post-3-1060702904.jpg

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Broznitsky

So I interpret this to mean that for both FP1 and FP2, the man is kept in irons (shackles) at all times, whether at the front or away, whether on the move or not, UNLESS the CO says otherwise. I would hope that in the trenches my pal next to me wouldn't be shackled, just because he stole some potatoes. How hard is it to fire a SMLE with chains dangling from your arms?? :blink: It doesn't seem very safe . . .

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mordac

Hi Broz:

Field punishment was at the discretion of Commanding Officers and was awarded for 'minor' breaches of discipline. As you can see from the attachment (page 216 of the same book) a CO had a broad range of powers. I would assume a CO could apply, suspend, and reapply field punishment as he saw fit.

There are six pages of major charges in the book with sentences that include cashiering, maximum 14 years penal servitude, transportation for life, or death. These sentences required a courts-martial under the Army Act. :(

Garth

post-3-1060710479.jpg

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Guest stevebec

There were no shackles or such in the AIF.

FP 2 was given and the soldier would be forced to do all the dirty work within the company during this time.

He would work his normal hours but on their off time he would do all the odd jobs.

In my days it was called CB (confinded to barracks).

If FP1 or HL (hard labor) was given the soldier would be sent to the British disiplanry unit for punishment.

S.B

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