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Remembered Today:

David Seymour

Capt J A C Johnson, The King's (Liverpool Regt.)

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David Seymour   
David Seymour

Please could someone look this chap up in Soldiers Died and/or the Census? I am particularly interested in what his initials stand for, but other information also gratefully received.

Name: JOHNSON

Initials: J A C

Nationality: United Kingdom

Rank: Captain

Regiment/Service: The King's (Liverpool Regiment)

Unit Text: 8th Bn.

Date of Death: 21/08/1918

Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead

Grave/Memorial Reference: A. 57.

Cemetery: RAILWAY CUTTING CEMETERY, COURCELLES-LE-COMTE

Very many thanks for any help you can give.

Best wishes,

David

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Paul Johnson   
Paul Johnson

James Alexander Campbell - 8th(Irish) Battalion - Kings Liverpool Regiment

Regards

Paul J

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Procat   
Procat

Hi David,

Name: James Alexander Campbell Johnson

Regiment: King's (Liverpool regiment)

Battalion: 8th (Irish) Battalion (Territorial)

Rank: Capt

Died Date: 21 Aug 1918

Died How: Killed in action.

(Beaten by Paul)

Doug

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Procat   
Procat

I've just had a look in the 1901 census. Unfortunately the name is too common. Without further information such as approximate year of birth etc I don't think he can be located.

Doug

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David Seymour   
David Seymour

Paul and Doug,

Thank you very much. That is a great help as I think that I have now identified a chap who is known, on the memorial I'm looking at, as Campbell-Johnson.

With best wishes,

David

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David Seymour   
David Seymour

Many thanks to all who have helped with this puzzle so far. I have made a little more progress but still can't pin him down to a census with any certainty. So if anyone with an interest in The King's can assist with something that would enable me to continue my hunt amongst the census records I would be most grateful.

The closest I can get is a 1901 Scottish Census record:

James Alex Johnson Parents: Alexander and Barbara A. Born abt 1894 Shetland, Yell.

I have certainly found him in the Gazette, but only once:

SUPPLEMENT TO THE LONDON GAZETTE, 28 NOVEMBER, 1914. 10115

8th (Irish) Battalion, The King's (Liverpool Regiment).

James Alexander Campbell Johnson to be Captain. Dated 14th November, 1914.

He has a service record at the PRO:

WO 374/37707 JOHNSON, Capt J A C

And an interesting MIC on the NA database, but nothing on Ancestry - where there are only eight Johnsons, which gives him as a Lt Col in the Liverpool Regt Transport:

Medal card of Johnson, James Alex Campbell

Liverpool Regiment Transport Captain

Liverpool Regiment Transport Lieutenant Colonel

Thank you for any help you can give.

With best wishes,

David

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Promenade   
Promenade

David,

I have sent you a transcription of his papers

Promenade

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David Seymour   
David Seymour

Joe,

Very many thanks for a very detailed account of JAC Johnson. My PM reply is on its way.

With best wishes,

David

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David Seymour   
David Seymour

Thanks to Joe's information we can place James in the Boer War in 1901 and in Australia for the 1891 census. Unsurprising that he could not be found!

Now I have been able to trace James' marriage to Gladys in 1912, and the birth of their son Alan in 1913. Alan appears to have been an only child.

With best wishes,

David

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Virginia Campbell-Johnson   
Virginia Campbell-Johnson

I have just happened upon this correspondence!  My name is Virginia Campbell-Johnson granddaughter of James Alexander Campbell Johnson. I have his sword, medals and other memorabilia. I am married and live in Italy. 

My father Alan Campbell-Johnson was press attache to Mountbatten the last Viceroy of India and author of Mission with Mountbatten. 

Virginia Campbell Johnson (Valentini)

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Virginia Campbell-Johnson   
Virginia Campbell-Johnson

Is David Seymour still around and interested in this subject?? Does he have any other info I should know about. The family had always understood that my grandfather had taken a direct hit and so therefore there was no grave. So you can imagine my surprise at learning this news. 

Many thanks

V. Campbell-Johnson

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gareth morris   
gareth morris

Hello Virginia, 

http://www.britishwargraves.co.uk/page14.htm if you follow this link you may be able to obtain a photo of the headstone. 

Also if you go to the "cwgc" website you can enter his details and get copies of the original documents relating to his grave/ burial. 

Good luck, hope this helps. 

Gareth

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Virginia Campbell-Johnson   
Virginia Campbell-Johnson

Many thanks!!!

Virginia

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BillyH   
BillyH
5 hours ago, Virginia Campbell-Johnson said:

Is David Seymour still around and interested in this subject??

 

He last visited the Forum on 22nd August 2017, so he should pick up on the new posts soon.

 

BillyH.

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Stephen Nulty   
Stephen Nulty

Captain Johnson was serving with the 13th Battalion when  he was killed

 

The Battalion War Diary read, 
“20th August 1918
Orders received that the Third Army were to advance on Bapaume. 

21st August 1918
During the early hours of the morning, assisted by a bright moon, the Battalion formed up in rear of our front line. The frontage covered was 600 yards. “C” Coy were on the right, “D” Coy on the left. “B” and “A” Coys were in support on the right and left respectively.
There was slight and intermittent shelling of the Assembly area. The Battalion was in position well before Zero Hour, fixed for 4.55 am, 21st August.
At Zero Hour, the Battalion moved forward in Artillery Formation behind the 2nd Division who were to capture the BLUE LINE before we passed through them to capture the RED LINE. Tanks co-operates with the 2nd Division.
At dawn a tick mist hung on the ground, This was increased to great density by the smoke cloud put out to cover the tanks. Direction was extremely difficult. Troops could not be distinguished at 20 yards. All officers were moving by the compass and this alone enabled a general direction to be kept.
Throughout the whole advance the troops never hesitated in moving forward even though nothing could be seen fo their objective or of troops on their flanks. 
The advance to the BLUE LINE was about 2000 yards. Before reaching the leading Companies came into action rushing Machine Guns and killing and capturing their crews.
From the BLUE LINE to the RED LINE was approximately another 2500 yards. Frech tanks were to have led this advance to the objective but these did not arrive and the men pushed on to the barrage. Several strong points were encountered. Lewis Gun and rifle fire was brought to bear on them and the points eventually outflanked.
On the way to the railway, the fog became so thick and direction so uncertain that progress inevitably slackened. By the time our troops reached the railway the barrage had lifted from it. The arrival at the railway was known to all by the heavy Machine Gun fire which they eventually came under. 
“D” Coy on the left had skirted the Southern side of COURCELLS-LE-COMPTE where many prisoners were taken and aided by one tank from the Left Brigade established themselves on the railway. “C” Coy on the right has no tank assisting them but advancing by short rushes they eventually rushed the Machine Guns on the railway and established themselves on the right of “D” Coy. 
Some of the two Supporting Companies had closed up previous to the railway being attacked and the total casualties were heavy. Three Company Commanders became casualties and many men were caught by the heavy Machine Gun fire. 
Units were considerably mixed up on the railway but re-organisation immediately took place and the East Side of the railway was consolidated.
On out right the troops were not actually on the railway but were dug in about 50 yards to 100 yards on the Western side. This left our right flank very exposed and the enemy took the greatest advantage of harassing our position on the railway.
Towards mid-day the mist lifted slightly but it was not found possible for Cavalry to go through and no Whippet Tanks advanced on our front.
Enemy artillery was active throughout the day. At night, “A” and “B” Coys dug in on a Support Line approximately 200 yards west of the railway and “C” and “D” Coys held the railway line.”

 

 

Snap 2017-09-14 at 08.36.35.png

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Virginia Campbell-Johnson   
Virginia Campbell-Johnson

This is all fascinating. My grandfather had a very interesting (albeit short) and adventurous life. Born into an old and distinguished  Australian family closely related to governor Mcquarie he left Adelaide aged 15 lying about his age to fight in the Boer War in Kitchener's horse. He then settled in London to become a journalist and esteemed theatre critic meeting up and collaborating with Lord Northcliffe founder of the Daily Mail and Daily Mirror.  Somewhere I have a photo of him in the London Illustrated news peering over the top of a trench using some makeshift gadget of his own and also his obituary. 

It just breaks my heart to think of all that waste and also that my father died before learning of his final resting place.  At least he is commemorated on my grandmother's headstone in the lovely churchyard in Weston on the Green. 

I shall now print this all up so that my own daughters and granddaughters can learn about their heritage. 

Many thanks 

Virginia 

 

 

 

 

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David Seymour   
David Seymour

Hi Virginia,

I've just picked up this thread.  Many thanks to BillyH for his PM drawing my attention to it. 

 

My PM to you is en route.

 

David

Edited by David Seymour

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