Jump to content
Great War Forum

Remembered Today:

andigger

What WW1 books are you reading?

Recommended Posts

andigger

t87t... thanks for bringing this thread back up, I'd thought about doing it myself.

At the moment I am re-reading The Donkeys by Alan Clark. I think it will be interesting to compare the 1915 BEF with the 1917 French Army that mutinied. I just finished Dare Call it Treason.

Andy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest AmericanDoughboy

I am in the middle of reading "The Last Days of Innocence" by Meirion & Susie Harries. It is quite a good read, however it is a bit dry in areas. But I must say, I recommend it to anyone who is interested in America's involvement in the First World War.

-Doughboy

post-22-1092004562.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Malcolm

Tommy, by Prof Richard Holmes. So far up to Holmes usual high standard.

Aye

Malcolm

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kiwiwriter

I was just re-reading "Haig's Command," by Denis Winter. He really hates the Field Marshal, and accused him of everything short of bestiality. The cover says, "Haig's Command: A Re-Appraisal."

I showed that to a friend, and he said, "What does the book say, Haig was a genius?"

"No, it says he was an idiot."

"That's a 're-appraisal?'" :blink:

Maybe it's a re-re-appraisal. :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Stephen White

I have at last got round to re-starting Forgotten Voices,which i've had since Christmas.I started it in Febuary and then put it down when i came across my copy of Titanic,the ship that never sank !!.

I was spurred into action by my Dad who had a copy for his birthday and red it in two days.

Stephen :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest AmericanDoughboy

I have now started reading Dr. John R. Schindler's epic account "Isonzo" telling the story of the Italians in the World War. I must say that by only the twelve pages I have read, it is one of the best books I have ever set my eyes upon. The way he explains things are just so realistic, that I can not stop reading until I fall asleep.

-Doughboy

post-22-1093028277.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
harribobs

I'm about a third through 'Tommy' and as malcolm says, up to his usual standard ( very high) and very very readable

good to see 'forgotton voices' getting good reviews, it's an direct insight into the conflict and again very readable

so many books to go.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
HarryBettsMCDCM

Just started "Glory Is No Compensation",from my local Library{before I opt for the parting of Cash version!}The Story of the 1st Regular,& 6th{Service} Battalions of the Border Regiment in Gallipoli 1915,a very well written & researched book with a plethora of pre 1914 Photos,@ £19.95{Post Paid} H/B from the Regimental Museum its beginning to look like a Bargain! :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
HarryBettsMCDCM
What got me started on the First World War was Ernest Raymonds "Tell England" about forty years ago when I was twelve. Anyone else ever heard of it. I was the only person at Hgih School who had ever heard of Gallipoli.

It nestles in my book shelves!!! :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
spike10764

At the moment, it's Forgotten Voices of the Great War by Max Arthur

- must be catching.

after that I've got Fire Over England

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Paul Hederer

"Verdun, die Schlacht und der Mythos," by German Werth. Been great so far, and has added perspective from the German side.

Paul Hederer

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DaveDocDavies

My first book on the Great War was Thomason's Fix Bayonets! ... found in my 4th grade school library in a very worn condition. A fictionalized account of the author's WWI US Marine Corps service with AEF. It was reprinted in a deluxe hardback version with author's charcoal sketches in the 1990's. I must say, it held up well in the 25 years between readings.

I read Mosier's Myth ... and found the overview of the battles and bibliography notes worth the effort (aside from the American slant which would be off-putting). I used the bibliography to draw up a shopping list and key word search list which has been quite successful (I found this Forum's Pals in one search :D

The waiting stack now has: Denis Winter's DEATH'S MEN, Winston Groom's A STORM IN FLANDERS, J. Ellis' EYE DEEP IN HELL, and A. Simpson's HOT BLOOD & COLD STEEL. I'm looking forward to immersing myself in the story of the Other Ranks.

Doc D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
marc leroux

Well, I'm about half way through an Inspector Rebus novel (A Question of Blood), and although it wasn't the intent, it is a good read so I threw it out.

I finished, in quick succession, Desmond Morton's "When your Number's Up", "Silent Battle: Canadian Prisoners of War in Germany, 1914 to 1919", "Marching to Armageddon" by Morton/Granatstein. All are highly recommended, particularily for anyone interested in the CEF.

I have read through the parts of volume 1 of "Canada and the age of conflict" by C.P. Stacey that dealt with the 1910 - 1922 period and found that to be quite interesting.

marc

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Neil Burns

No WWI currently I'm re-reading 'The Northern Crusades' by Eric Christianson regarding the Crusades against the Prussians, Lithuanians, Estonians, Russians etc. Te familiariaze myself again with the subject so I can read Urban's 'Teutonic Knights'.

Man can not live by World War I alone!

Take Care,

Neil

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest tartan87terror

Re my earlier posting, I couldn't get a copy of Salonika and After[/b] by H. C. Owen, from any public library in New Zealand!

So, I've taken out a copy of Return to Salonika by Charles Parker, and I'll get stuck into it tonight.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tim Godden

Hi There,

I'm reading Tolkien and the Great War at the moment. I am finding it a very interesting book and would recommend it to any one who has an interest in one, the other or, indeed, neither.

All the best,

Tim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jim Gordon

Just started to re-read "A Private in the Guards" by Stephen Graham that I acquired for the princely sum of 2 1/2 P (i.e. sixpence in old currency) in a second-hand Ediburgh bookshop during WW2. This is the book that sparked of my enduring interest in all matters re WW1. It is a good read by a man of sensitivity who, although eligible for a commission, elected to serve as a Private. He gives a graphic description of the tough training guardsmen endured and tells of his experiences during the "last 100 Days" when he finally reached the Front just as Cambrai was drawing to a close.

The book was published in 1919 by Macmillan & Co.

Regards

Jim Gordon

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hambo

Just finished "MacRae's Battalion" brilliantly researched I thought. Just started "London Scottish in the Great War"

Hambo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Hangleton

Major & Mrs Holts Battlefield guide to the Somme

I'm going next Spring - hopefully. It seems very detailed and the accompanying map will be very useful I think.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Apache IP

I just finished Liason: 1914 Not bad, but I found it dry. However the historical context of reading a first person account at the staff level really helps with understanding the scope of the problems facing the the BEF and the French staff. You also are made aware of just how detached the staff becomes from the actual fighting.

I have just received Tommy and Redcoat. I am only a short way through Tommy but I already love this book.

Regards,

Bert

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
andigger

Apache IP... Glad to hear you just read Liason: 1914... its on my shelf, but I am a little intimidated by the size. But I do like the first person accounts... guess I won't know until I start it..... Andy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
john w.

I have recently completed Robert Raves.. Goodbye to all that...

A very readable and enjoyable book and one that is easy to follow and understand. I enjoyed the way in which Graves took the reader through his life in many ways quite candidly.

I am now engaged in reading Memoirs of a fox hunting man by Seigfried Sassoon. Equally superb reading, and have a copy of the Infantry Officer awaiting me later, but alas not Sherston's Progress the last in the trilogy, but will sort that out when I get to it.

As I read these books written some time ago I feel that for us to write about historical events, both fact and fiction, is a problem. We cannot hope to capture the pre Great War heady days that Sassoon experienced. In addition for some readers what Sassoon writes is from another planet. We cannot grasp the concepts as we have been brought up in another time with a different set of rules. How can we overcome it?

John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest tartan87terror

Interesting observations by you, John. I agree, we may just have to cope by knowing that it will be very difficult, nigh on impossible for any but the very best of us to recreate the times of just pre-war and then the war and immediately post-war times.

I',trying to write a film screenplay based on what little I know of my grandfather's Salonika experiences, with another WW1 story involving mainly Palestine thrown in, and I'm reading what I can to try to see it more and more through the eyes of the man in the ranks, particularly artillery. I may never finish the project, but I'm learning a lot, and feeling that I can better appreciate what grandad and all of those others went through. But, I know I'll most likely never come close!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
john w.

Historically any work can be correct and satisfy the purists, uniforms and the events. To get further is potentially the holy grail... Spielberg achieved much in the opening events of Private Ryan, and gained the accolades from veterans. For us to understand we need pointers and texts that we can understand and relate to, therein lies the potential downfall.. modern versus contemporary.

John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jdajd

Just finsihed Storm of Steel, which I thought was amazing. I just got two new books from the store Seeking Victory on the Western Front: The British Army and Chemical Warfare in WWI by Haythornwaite and Have you Forgotten Yet?: The First World War Memoirs of C.P. Blacker. I cannot decide which to read first any suggestions?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×